.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

People

  • Vincent adds engineering knowledge to KDE

     Project Lead The Way Engineering Master Teacher Darrell Vincent has been selected to continue to serve on the task force working on Engineering curriculum, standards, and certifications with KDE.

    According to Mark Harrell, Engineering Consultant & Director of KYTSA, Career Pathways Branch, Division of College and Career Readiness, Office of Career and Technical Education, Vincent will work specifically with the Engineering Technology Education Curriculum Team.

  • Steinmetz selected state’s JEA director

     Bullitt East High School’s English Dept. Chair Larry Steinmetz has been named the State Journalism Director for the Journalism Education Association (JEA).

    Steinmetz has also been named to the executive board of the Southern Interscholastic Press Association (SIPA), a regional group which encompasses the southeastern United States.

  • Concern over pension changes leads Mann to retire as commonwealth attorney

     SHEPHERDSVILLE — It wasn’t something Mike Mann was looking to do.

    His original plan was to finish out his term as commonwealth attorney next December and not run for another term.

    However, as the talk on pension reforms continued in Frankfort and as he already had enough time to retire, Mann’s decision to retire last month made more sense.

    Having started as a volunteer in the commonwealth attorney’s office in 1987 and being elected to that position in 1992, Mann decided it was time to leave.

  • Book deals with homesickness for Kentucky

    CLERMONT— How do you describe homesickness?

    Is it possible to be homesick for a place you know little about?

    Why are Kentuckians so infatuated with their home state?

    These questions are what prompted Lexington native Jesse Donaldson to write 120 passages attempting to answer the age-old question: can we ever really go back home?

    Inspired by the 120 counties of Kentucky, “On Homesickness” features 120 passages dedicated to the various history, events, or make-up of each county.

  • Mom, pop ready to retire at Country Cabin

    HEBRON ESTATES-- For 14 years, a local shop has brought country charm to the edge of northern Bullitt County.

    Located in the Hebron Building on West Hebron Lane, Country Cabin Treasures began as a small space for Joann and Bill Doyle to sell country-themed items.

    Three years prior to opening, Joann ran a similar shop with her niece in Lincoln County. Once the hour and a half drive started to wear on her, the couple looked into a spot closer to home.

  • Roby continues to play football despite some early obstacles

    MOUNT WASHINGTON—When Luke Roby was four years old, his dad signed amputation papers for his son’s foot. Now, 11 years later, Roby continues to defy the odds as he finished his second year playing football for Bullitt East.

    In May 2006, Roby was playing in the backyard at his grandparent’s house with his older siblings. His grandfather had recently been in a car accident and was still in the hospital. Roby’s dad, Skee, had brought the kids along while he mowed the yard.

  • Young Athlete Dies Doing What He Loved

     BELMONT - A Bullitt County native who lived his life to the fullest died last week doing what he loved doing most.

    Nathan Hall, 21, passed away from injuries sustained in an accident during a Motocross training session at a track in Louisiana.

    Family, friends and those in the motocross community are all mourning the loss and hundreds would converge in his hometown to express their sympathies.

    Nate was a Belmont resident, the son of Paul and Tonya Hall, and attended Bullitt Central High School, Bernheim Middle and Lebanon Junction Elementary.

  • Amy’s Army to hold fund-raiser to assist with major medical expenses

    MOUNT WASHINGTON—It never hurts to get a second opinion. In fact, sometimes a second opinion can save a life.

    Amy Baker, 34, learned that the hard way.

    Three years ago, Baker had an MRI done from her tailbone to her brain to check on rods in her spine. During the scan, something  was found. A biopsy in 2015 proved the spots to be benign so her doctor just had her return every six months for ultrasounds to ensure everything was okay.

    By listening to her gut, she discovered it wasn’t.

  • Human trafficking is real

     SHEPHERDSVILLE—At 38, Summer Dickerson has worked as a call girl, had guns to her head, been buried alive, seen friends killed in front of her, been purchased by a pimp and been exploited. Most importantly Summer Dickerson has survived.

    Dickerson is a product of human trafficking and a new coalition in Bullitt County has made it their goal to ensure no one else has to experience the life Dickerson has lived.

    Dickerson shared her story with the coalition in hopes of helping bring awareness to the reality of human trafficking.

  • Keith attends state clerks’ college

      Bullitt County Circuit Court Clerk Paulitta Keith joined fellow circuit clerks in celebrating the 25th anniversary of their Trust For Life program as part of the 2017 Circuit Court Clerks Fall College that took place Sept. 17-20 in Covington.

    The Kentucky Association of Circuit Court Clerks created the Kentucky Circuit Court Clerks’ Trust For Life to educate Kentuckians about the life-saving mission of organ donation.