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Today's Features

  •  A generous man made a special donation to the Mount Washington Police Department and Shepherdsville Fire Department recently. 

    Mount Washington resident Brad Williams donated to of his teddy bears to the chiefs so they can be given to children who need it most. 

    The departments keep bears and other stuffed animals on hand with them to give to children who might be at fires or domestic disputes to help keep their minds off of the situation.

    “It would be good if everyone could give a bear,” Brad said.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE -- A Bullitt County resident is getting some big recognition for her time and talent. 

    Tammy Ott, owner of Today’s Kids Childcare & Learning Facility in Shepherdsville, was one of six recently nominated for the EPIC Award given by the National Association of Women Business Owners of Louisville.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - There are many community members who have wanted to help the homelessness crisis in Bullitt County over the years.

    There is no emergency homeless shelter facility in the county. There is The Shepherd’s Shelter, Inc. that tries to assist in a long-term way to obtain self-sustainability.

    There is no crisis food emergency cafeteria, although groups such as Martie’s Kitchen and Two Fish Ministries offer weekly meals.

  •  BOWLING GREEN -- Thirty-two students from Western Kentucky University and the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky will present their research at the 2015 Posters-at-the-Capitol event Feb. 19 in Frankfort.

    Richard Arnold, a senior from Cleaton, and Caitlyn Clark, a senior from Roundhill, will present Building Envelope Integrity Assessments. Faculty mentor: Robert Choate

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - The Bullitt Advanced Math and Science Academy (BAMS) continues to achieve excellence in preparing some of the area's finest students for their college and career paths.

    BAMS recently hosted a science fair for its students, with projects specifically dedicated to research at Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest.

    The program is designed as an accelerated educational course for students, who complete their high school equivalency in two years, followed by a college associate's degree over the next two years.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Work continues on restoring the Bowman Valley Schoolhouse.

    The last African-American schoolhouse in the county was recently moved to its new home next to the Bullitt County Board of Education.

    According to project volunteer Gwinn Hahn, several activities are currently underway.

    With the assistance of students from Bellarmine University, an oral history is being collected from former students of the school.

  •   SHEPHERDSVILLE - Since the day Jessica Dishon disappeared on Sept. 10, 1999, the worlds of two families changed forever.

    One would spend the next 15-plus years wondering who would brutally assault and then murder the Bullitt Central High School student.

    Another would feel the stares of those believing that David “Bucky” Brooks was the person responsible.

    On Thursday, the parents of Jessica Dishon would sit in a Nelson County Courthouse as Stanley Dishon would enter an Alford plea for his role in the death of his niece.

  •  When February rolls around, people usually always have love on the brain. But some often forget to consider the health of their heart first.

    February is also American Heart Month and continuing with the tradition the Bullitt County Health Department will sponsor the Healthy Hearts Wear Red luncheon Thursday, Feb. 26.

    “Heart disease is one of the silent killers,” said Liz McGuire, Bullitt County Health Department health education coordinator.  “A lot of people don’t know they have issues until something happens.”

  •  It was time Monday to say the final goodbyes to Les Bandy, deputy director of Bullitt County Emergency Management Agency. He died on Thursday evening in a single vehicle accident off Highway 44 West.

    Thousands of emergency responders from Bullitt County and throughout the state of Kentucky came to express gratitude for Bandy’s 35-plus years of service to the community.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - There have been moments where the community appears to be divided.

    Whether it’s during election time, or if it’s involving business such as the Southeast Bullitt Fire Department and Board of Trustees, or whether it’s just disagreements at city council meetings.

    Randy Pace has noticed it. As pastor of the Family Worship Center, as a Christian, and as a Bullitt Countian, it’s a heavy burden.