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Today's Features

  •     SHEPHERDSVILLE – While Bullitt County awaits finalization of current road improvements, Fiscal Court members caught a glimpse of long-term future projects.

        Brian Aldridge, Kentucky Transportation Cabinet (KTC) planning manager, presented plans created in conjunction with Kentucky Regional Planning and Development Agency (KIPDA) research.

        Suggestions from two public input meetings and three steering committee meetings were factored into the plans, Aldridge said.

  • The largest crowd to attend the National Day of Prayer observance gathered Thursday at Shepherdsville City Park.

    A variety of local ministers talked to a crowd of over 350 people and led prayers for various groups.

    Ashley Bowman read her children’s prayer. Pastor Jim Bob Outland of Bullitt Lick Baptist blessed the Bible. Jeanette Allen got the day started with her ram’s horn.

    The National Day of Prayer takes place each year on May 6.

  •     SHEPHERDSVILLE - Matthew Hatfield found a positive from the recent flooding along the Salt River.

        A 68-pound positive.

        Hatfield caught a large catfish while fishing at the Shepherdsville City Park Monday evening. The fish was officially weighed at Fischer’s Sporting Goods.

        “I never would’ve dreamed something that big would come out of the Salt River,” Hatfield said.

  •     HILLVIEW - Corbin Huff loved Tae Kwon Do.  He started taking lessons as a child.  In 1993 he began teaching Tae Kwon Do to blind students at the University of Louisville and in May of 1993 Master Corbin and his students at U of L were featured in the magazine, Karate Profile.

  •     HILLVIEW - Mary Raidt’s homeroom was transfigured into the House of Wax.

        The Overdale Elementary teacher had her students become historical and popular figurines in a class project called “The Wax Museum.”

        Each student selected a character to portray in the museum.

        “It was the students’ choice,” said Raidt. “Either historical figures or current celebrities. I just let them choose someone they were interested in.”

  •      Five Bullitt county programs that provide services for children and youths have been selected by the Bullitt County Advisory Board to receive funding from the Metro United Way.

        These one-time grants, totaling $41,905, have been made available from funds raised by the 2008-09 Metro United Way Campaign in Bullitt County.   

  •     WASHINGTON - The American Red Cross has opened more than two dozen shelters in response to a powerful weather system that generated tornadoes and caused severe flooding across the South.

  •     SHEPHERDSVILLE - The Kentucky Baptist Convention has been improving communities all over the state for nearly 17 years with a program that’s shown participants the value and reward of hard work and helping others.

        Kentucky Changers assembles people from four states and sends them to areas across the commonwealth to make exterior repairs to the homes of low-income families.

  •     It was the kind of beautiful day a hero deserved. Family and friends gathered at Cedar Grove Cemetery to commemorate the anniversary of the day SSG Gary Lee Woods, Jr., was killed in Iraq.

        The Bullitt County native was serving with the Delta Company of the 1st Battalion, 67th Armor Regiment, deployed to Mosul as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom on Apr. 10, 2009.

  • Betty Marshall, the family resource coordinator for Overdale and Maryville Elementary schools, was recently honored for winning the Harry J. Cowherd Award.

    The award is given to the top FRC facilities in Kentucky. Michael Denny, state director of family resource centers, and Tammy Gay, regional program manager, were among the dignitaries who attended a special celebration at Overdale Elementary.

    Others at the special ceremony included Bullitt County Judge Melanie Roberts and Terry Price, director of elementary education for Bullitt County.