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Today's Features

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - Friday was a day for the nation to remember military personnel who have not yet returned home.

    Some may be prisoners of war or some may be missing in action.

    But there are over 88,000 Americans who have not returned home.

    On Thursday evening, the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5710 and its Ladies Auxiliary hosted a special service to observe national POW/MIA day.

    As part of the ceremony was the raising of the POW/MIA flag donated by the American Legion Post 157 in Shepherdsville.

  • The Bullitt County Chamber of Commerce hosted its annual Health Fair on Thursday at Paroquet Springs Conference Centre.

    Shepherdsville resident Tina Zamora wasn’t a happy camper and it had nothing to do with the recent UL-UK football game. She was getting her finger pricked by Chris Cope, a registered nurse with Jewish Hospital. It was part of a free cholesterol screening.

    Semi Phelps has her blood pressure checked by Jewish Hospital's Ashley Riley.

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - It’s not an easy walk becoming an Eagle Scout, but one local Scout hopes to achieve it by making walking easier.

    Jamie Stottman is working toward becoming the first Eagle Scout recognized by Troop 685 since the group rechartered two years ago.

    An Eagle Scout must complete at least 100 hours of a service project that benefits the community. Stottman helped to plan and create a sidewalk between Shepherdsville Elementary and Bullitt Lick Middle School, where Troop 685 meets.

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - The first two years of classes at the Bullitt County campus of Jefferson Community and Technical College have been successful.

    Enrollment at the classes have grown by 73 percent over the that time and is 30 percent more than school officials anticipated.

    There were seven high school students who participated this past year in a dual credit program.

    But Dr. Dan Ash and Donna Miller are not satisfied. They believe the college has much more potential.

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - As a Physical Education instructor, Amanda Yarbrough understands team concept and a ‘we-can’ attitude.

    In Yarbrough’s classes at Bullitt Lick Middle School, that sometimes also refers to a ‘Wii-can’ approach.

    Yarbrough implemented the Nintendo Wii gaming system in PE classes. Over the next year she enhanced her teaching program for use by all students, including those with special needs.

  • HEBRON ESTATES - Sometimes a new job just feels like a perfect fit.

    Marcella Minogue feels that way about her new role as Freedom Elementary principal.

    The former Freedom instructor took over this week as the school’s first female principal.

    “Having taught here I saw the wonderful part of Freedom,” she said. “I knew what it had to offer.”

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - When he sees a military person in uniform at a restaurant, there's a good chance he will pay for their meal.

    Although he never served in the military, he believes the men and women who serve this country should be honored and remembered.

    His latest way to honor the veterans was to purchase a monument and plaque.

    During a special ceremony Thursday, the monument was dedicated in Shepherdsville City Park.

    The city employee doesn't want his identity to be known, although his friends know who "he" is.

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - The Bullitt County Sheriffs are adding a little more horse sense to the department.

    Sheriff Donnie Tinnell appointed special deputy Rick Miller to head a new equine investigation unit established to focus on potential cases of horse neglect or abuse.

    “We get calls and we wanted someone qualified to check them,” said Tinnell. “(Miller) knows a lot about horses and he’s been around here a long time.”

  • Kentucky wineries pocketed 72 medals, including four gold medals, at the Kentucky State Fair wine competition Aug. 15 in Louisville.

  • CLERMONT -- If you were a student, what would you do with a teacher standing on your front porch?

    Bernheim Middle School teachers were knocking on doors, only to let students know there was nothing to fear.

    Taking an idea from a successful program in Mason County, Bernheim implemented a home visitation program prior to the first day of classes.

    Administrators, teachers and counselors traveled in pairs to the homes of every registered Bernheim student.