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Today's Features

  •  For the past 13 years, a North Bullitt senior is awarded the Megan Reader Scholarship.

    It is in memory of Megan, who passed away at the age of 19 in a 2004 auto accident.

    Hannah Robinson was awarded this year’s $1,000 scholarship. She will attend Bellarmine University and major in nursing.

    Sam Reader, Megan’s brother, and Brittany Wimsatt presented the check to Hannah.

    Over $21,500 has been presented through the scholarship fund since its inception.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - To serve God and my country, to help people at all times, and to live by the Girl Scout law… also, take what you need, and give what you can.

    Bethany Greenwell, representing Girl Scout Troop 152 in Shepherdsville, is completing her Gold Award project by helping to place three Shepherds Pantry boxes throughout the community.

    The boxes were first created by the Shepherdsville First Church of the Nazarene, allowing residents of many areas a place where they could donate food or collect food depending on their need.

  • MOUNT WASHINGTON— Going to middle school means experiencing new adventures and new pressures.

    One group of fifth grade friends from Mount Washington Elementary decided to encourage their classmates to defeat those pressures by utilizing their school-wide talent show.

    Kyla Combs, 10; Kami Ford, 11; Ashley Love, 11; and Raegan Soeder, 10, performed a dance to the Colbie Caillat song “Try”, which reminds girls that they ‘don’t have to try so hard’ nor do they have to ‘change a single thing’ to like themselves.

  •  The teaching profession is one where educators make a difference in the lives of students.

    For over a dozen teachers, the 2016-2017 school year was their swan song as they transition into retirement.

    Each retiree in attendance at the annual ceremony sponsored by the Bullitt County Retired Teachers Association and Bullitt County Public Schools was recognized for their contributions to education.

  •   SHEPHERDSVILLE -- “I would be dead.”

    Richard Jesse is sure that if his life continued on the path it was taking, he would have been dead by now.

    The Jefferson County native had been in and out of jail since the age of 17. Alcohol and drugs had consumed his life.

    It wasn’t as if Jesse hadn’t tried to seek help. He’d been to various treatment facilities.

    “I knew I needed help,” said Jesse.

  •  CLERMONT – The summer has finally arrived and Bernheim’s June calendar is full of exciting events and activities, including the Visitor Center Grand Re-opening on Saturday, June 3, from 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

    Celebrate the Visitor Center’s recent renovations with great food, music and children’s activities. 

    As Kentucky’s first LEED® platinum certified building, the event will honor the past decade of the Visitor Center’s nature-inspired build that has helped teach thousands of visitors about sustainable design.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON—Once upon a time, a girl sat next to a boy in the gym of the old Mount Washington High School. Today, that same girl and boy are celebrating 75 years of marriage.

    To get away from a fellow chasing her around the gym during the 1938 basketball season, 14-year-old farm girl Dorothy Swearingen sat in an empty seat next to 17-year-old farm boy Melvin Porter.

    “I just went up and sat down,” she said. “I knew who his family was but I didn’t know a thing about him.”

  • HEBRON ESTATES - The Relay for Life has had to adapt in recent years with a number of changes to the annual community event.

    This included a move from the new North Bullitt High School track, which could not be implemented. A makeshift track did the trick in the back of the North Bullitt parking lot, with some folks actually enjoying the condensed version.

    Like the event itself, cancer survivors and their caregivers are always adapting lives to various insinuating circumstances. Despite life’s changes, they continue to adapt and survive.

  •  CEDAR GROVE - Kindergarten used to be the educational level that prepared students for their future learning experiences. Then pre-school was established to prepare students for Kindergarten.

    A pilot program allowed students that were unable to attend pre-school an opportunity to prepare for their future education, along with their parents and guardians.

    The Little Academy helps children familiarize with school expectations while also assisting adults in preparing for their experience.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON—How do you have kids gets a firsthand understanding of what a life of substance abuse can do without giving them the actual substance?

    You give them the cliff notes version.

    Close to 400 eighth graders from Mount Washington and Eastside middle schools were given the chance to “live through” sibling’s deaths, friends’ addictions and their own “go-to-jail” scenarios by attending “Truth and Consequences: The Choice is Yours.”