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Today's Features

  •  Having spent his entire professional career (26 years) at Mt. Washington Middle School, Shawn Pickett is now the top General following the retirement of longtime administrator Dr. Denise Allen.

    “I am extremely honored to be the principal,” he said. “It’s been a lifelong goal to lead such a wonderful school.”

    On Aug. 9, Pickett greeted returning students in his new role. Despite feeling comfortable in his hometown setting, it was a different opening day.

  •  FRANKFORT -- Forty-two students from Bullitt County have been named Senator Jeff Green Scholars by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA). 

    To earn this honor, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average each year of high school and at least a 28 composite on the ACT.

    These students have also earned $2,500 a year in Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES) awards. 

  •  The new Director of College and Career Programs/Innovative Programs is former Bullitt Lick Middle School Principal Lee Barger.

  •  The Bullitt County Chamber of Commerce will change up its annual Progressive Dinner this year.

    On Friday, Aug. 25, the Bourbon and Bites will be held.

    Participants will still travel to several locations but there won’t be the emphasis on a dinner.

    The night begins with a visit to the Jim Beam American Stillhouse from 5-6:30 p.m.

    The next stop will be at Four Roses distillery from 6:45-8 p.m.

    The final destination will be at Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest from 8:15-9:30 p.m.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE — It may look like a summer picnic.

    It may sound like a summer picnic.

    And it may smell like a summer picnic.

    But, it’s not.

    It’s a “social.”

    Opting to not hold its annual summer picnic, St. Aloysius will host its first social event on Saturday, Aug. 26, from 4-10 p.m.

    All the normal things you might expect at a summer picnic will be present. 

    However, one difference is that the event will be held inside the air-conditioned gym.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - Whether or not it turned out to be the event everyone was expecting, it was still a major event.

    Throughout Bullitt County, many went outside with specialty glasses in anticipation of glancing at the first total solar eclipse over the continental United States since 1979.

    The sun grew dimmer around 2:30 p.m., but total darkness was not achieved in the county. Regardless, everyone had fun and even learned a few things.

  •  LEBANON JUNCTION — Four hundred local students were prepared for with new backpacks, supplies, and haircuts thanks to the generosity of local churches working together.

    According to Church of God of Prophecy pastor Tina Lourd, the Driven Church contacted the Lebanon Junction Ministerial Association about hosting the back-to-school bash.

    The Elizabethtown-based church has hosted it previously in their area but, once other churches started hosting similar events, they decided to branch out.

  •  MEMPHIS, Tenn. - The golden tones of Major League Baseball have played an intregal role in the sport’s rich history.

    Most fans know the names that lend their voice to the unique branch of Americana: Vin Scully, Marty Brenneman, Mel Allen… and Curt Hart.

    Maybe you haven’t heard of Curt Hart, or at least not in a baseball sense, but the former Bullitt County resident currently plays an integral part in maintaining baseball’s rich history.

  •  HILLVIEW — There’s no re-dos in real life. When faced in a dangerous situation, there is often only one opportunity to get free. That’s where knowing what moves to rely on comes in handy.

    To Louisville Metro Police Officer Allan Manganello, Gracie Jiu-Jitsu offers the best options.

    “As an officer, I wanted to know techniques that were sure-fire ways to help me and my partner,” he said.

    Having studied martial arts growing up, Manganello began studying Gracie Jiu-Jitsu 25 years ago.

  •  Interest in the biggest coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in the U.S. has been growing leading up to the big event on Monday, August 21st!

    Fourteen states -- from Oregon to South Carolina -- lie in the “totality zone”, a 70-mile-wide, 3,000-mile-long arc where the moon will appear to completely blot the sun.  With all the buzz surrounding this celestial event, AAA East Central cautions those seeking an ideal location to view the eclipse to be mindful of traffic congestion and distracted driving.