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Today's Features

  •  BROOKS - The Brooks Elementary community is mourning the passing of one of its long-time teachers.

    Gina Rodgers Eisenback, who retired as the school’s reading interventionist, passed away Thursday. She was 50.

    Brooks principal Melissa Boyle said Eisenback was one of the staff members who moved from the old Brooks school building to the new location on Brooks Hill Road.

    Boyle said the staff was gathered together after school Thursday for the announcement, along with a prayer for Eisenback and her family.

  •  HILLVIEW — Knowing where to go in a drug abuse situation could be the matter of life or death.

    Unfortunately, little information is available to the public on where to go. That’s why the Partners of the Bullitt County 2020 Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) Substance Abuse Workgroup, in correlation with the Bullitt County Partners in Prevention substance abuse prevention coalition and the Access to Care Workgroup, have coordinated a public forum to invite community members and law enforcement to learn the jargon and the resources available.

  •  Daylight Savings Time will officially begin on Sunday, March 12, at 2 a.m.

    At that time, clocks will officially move ahead one hour to 3 a.m.

    Don't forget to set all of your clocks forward one hour this weekend. Also, Daylight Savings is also a good time to check batteries in smoke alarms.

    The Red Cross encourages the smoke alarm battery check practice, as well as practicing home evacuation plans, safety procedures, and preparing emergency kits during all Daylight Savings changes.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - Hey kids! It’s time for Bullitt County’s funnest, happiest, most enjoyable free event!

    The annual KidsFest, sponsored by KentuckyOne Health, will take place Saturday, March 11, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Paroquet Springs Conference Centre.

    Over 50 local businesses and organizations will host booths and tables featuring fun activities, information and a chance to win door prizes valued at $50 or more.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON — With a new president in office, talk of presidents past is high.

    For fifth graders at Old Mill and Mount Washington Elementary, the chance to talk to one of the most well-known presidents became real as Abraham Lincoln visited the schools.

    Sort of.

    Funded by the Family Resource Center, Kentucky Chautauqua performers presented the 16th president’s life and lessons to the students.

  •  It was another record year for the American Red Cross and its annual Valentine Gala.

    There was plenty of fun had by all as the dance floor was crowded all night in this major fund-raiser for the American Red Cross.

    See more photos by Thomas Barr by clicking here.

  •  Students at Lebanon Junction Elementary recently had fun while learning about overcoming obstacles and making good decisions.

    George Halitzka brought the GRIT game show from Drama by George to the school.

    Students were given opportunities to select occupations that they may want to pursue as a career.

    For more information on the program, go to www.dramabygeorge.com.

    See more photos from the event here.

  •  At the Kentucky Farm Bureau’s 97th annual meeting the first of December 2016, George Henderman was honored as the winner of the Distinguished Service to Farm Bureau. 

    He has dedicated his life to his family, church, and farm while also serving on the Bullitt County Farm Bureau Board of Directors for over 20 years.  George has also served in many other capacities in the county.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE -- With 54 years of public service in his blood, Larry Coy isn’t ready to retire to the recliner and remote.

    Coy has filed paperwork to begin his latest mission — to become the next Bullitt County sheriff.

    “It’s time we need to make a change,” said Coy. “You get that public service in your blood and it’s hard to get out.”

    Over his career, Coy started by serving 18 years in the U.S. Air Force. That led to a career with the Jefferson County Police, where he retired.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - An obituary can be as important to a person’s history as any other document.

    The Bullitt County History Museum believes that, collecting as many obituaries as possible for their records.

    Now, thanks to volunteer Brenda Rittman, that information is available on the museum’s computer database.

    For over three years Rittman has single-handedly gone through more than 13,000 obituaries for the database, dating back to the 1940s.