Today's Features

  •  Before the beginning of the school year, Zoneton Middle staff spent an afternoon to build community relations in the form of a scavenger hunt.

    Stops included Pioneer Village City Hall and Hillview City Hall.

  •  Tom Chamberlain, owner of Lights Out Bar and Grill, offered the Bullitt County Foundation for Educational Excellence a percentage of the proceeds from his music festival in exchange for workers.

    The foundation gives grants to classroom teachers to purchase items that they cannot afford.

    Accepting the check are board members Lisa Lewis, LouAnn Moore and Linda Belcher (Dolores Ashby could not attend).

  •  If you are having trouble repaying your Federal Stafford Loans, you may be able to take advantage of a deferment, according to the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA).

    A deferment lets you postpone paying your loans if you meet certain criteria. You can get a deferment if you are:

    *Still in college at least half time.

    *In a rehabilitation training program.


    *Having economic hardship.

    * In the military.

  •  CLERMONT - Bernheim Forest will be abuzz with programs and events throughout September, including the annual BugFest and Fall Plant Sale on Saturday, Sept. 17.

    BugFest, Bernheim’s celebration of insects and their relatives, welcomes families to meet multi-legged creatures, go on insect safaris and taste chocolate-covered crickets. Children are encouraged to dress as their favorite bugs for the Bug Parade and dance the buggy boogie.

    Fall Plant Sale

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Dan Johnson knows first-hand how traumatic the 9-11-01 events were in New York.

    He was there. He was really, really close. He was there to help those who were injured.

    For the first 13 years after the terrorist attack, Johnson was a regular at observances, either in New York or in Washington, D.C.

    Last year, Johnson was part of the 9-11 observance in Jefferson County.

    This year, Johnson is coordinating the Bullitt County 9-11 observance.

  •  CLERMONT - The Bourbon and Wine Trail will lead to some of the commonwealth’s finest wines, gathered together again for its annual festival.

    The 5th annual Wine Fest, presented by the Kentucky Wineries Association, will take place at the Bullitt County Fairgrounds.

    The two-day event has changed dated over the years, settling in for 2016 on Sept. 9-10.

    The Wine Fest is being presented in association with Ina Marcella Events and Think Tank Louisville.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - As the month of September began, the Kentucky Department for Public Health issued an advisory pertaining to a rash of overdoses involving heroin laced with another drug, fentanyl.

    As the month of August ended, two local organizations continued their struggle to educate the community on the dangers of heroin and other abused substances.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Each year, the Bullitt County Scottish Rite organization looks to honor individuals.

    The individuals honored are those who happen to be citizens who make the community a better place.

    The organization also honors one of its own.

    Recently, three individuals were honored.

    Starting his Masonic career in southern Indiana, Herman Schlageter crossed the river and settled in Kentucky.

    Eight years ago, he married the former Joan French.

  •     The 2016-2017 school year began with special honors for one elementary school music teacher.
        Stacey Stults was named District V Music Teacher of the Year by the Kentucky Music Educators Association (KMEA). She has taught music for 16 year investing time at Lebanon Junction and Nichols Elementary Schools before joining the Shepherdsville Elementary School staff when the doors opened in 2005.

  •     MOUNT WASHINGTON— Injured squirrels, rabbits, raccoons, opossums and bats have a new home in Mount Washington.
        Started in 2009, Second Chances Wildlife Center is a 501c3 clinic whose mission is to conserve wildlife through rehabilitation and education.
        “More and more, as animals are losing their habitats, they’re forced to come in closer and closer to humans,” founder Brigette Williams said, adding that 90 percent of what the organization gets in is due to human encroachment.