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Today's Features

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON—Students at Crossroads Elementary got to experience a special kind of snow day…an Al Snow day.

    The former WWE wrestler might have left Head at home, but he brought words of help to the students experiencing bullying.

    Snow reminded the students that sticks and stones may break bones but words can hurt the heart. He shared that he himself had been bullied and, if someone had been a bully, they still had a chance to turn things around.

  •  MOUNT WASHIINGTON -- Thomas Becke’s wife was a little concerned when he arrived home from work on Monday, Jan. 29.

    He seemed to be a little happier than normal.

    Becke, a Mount Washington resident, had reason to be happy. 

    On Monday, Jan. 29, he went into Pearl’s Food Mart on Highway 44 East. While there, he purchased a Folding Money Doubler scratch off ticket for the Kentucky Lottery. In playing that ticket, Becke would win $50,000.

  •  Mount Washington Mayor Barry Armstrong saw his shadow and more on a private tour of the Second Chances Wildlife Center on Groundhog’s Day.

    The center rehabs wildlife throughout the year but keeps a handful who can’t be released back into the wild as educational animals.

    Founder and Executive Director Brigette Brouillard woke one of the educational animals, a groundhog named Major, to celebrate his day.

  •  As snow accumulated, students picked up cameras and captured its scenic beauty in the third annual Snowmageddon Photo Contest sponsored by the Shepherdsville/Nichols Elementary School Family Resource Centers.

    Students had three days (Jan. 16-18) to take pictures in the themed Winter Wonderland contest.

    Coordinator Traci Gould said this was her third year facilitating the contest.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE — As he winds down a 39-year career at Beam Suntory, Jerry Summers has a new mission to use his talents.

    One of Summers’ main tasks has been to serve as director of community relations for the world’s biggest producer of bourbon.

    In that role, he’s seen the communities which have grown over the years. And a key component has been that those with a united front will prosper more.

    He wants to help Bullitt County to prosper.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE — Her last campaign was very stressful.

    Besides the many personal attacks on social media, Linda Belcher lost in her bid for a fourth term as the state representative for the 49th District.

    But the retired educator never lost hope that she would again run for the House seat.

    What she didn’t realize wasthat not only would she be running for a full two-year term in Frankfort, but she would also have a special election to run in February.

  •  CEDAR GROVE — Jeff Branham doesn’t think the Fourth District receives its fair share of attention.

    Having the largest district in terms of territory and tax base, Branham believes his area should be more in terms of projects.

    With that concern in mind, Branham has filed to run for Fourth District magistrate on the Democratic ticket.

    He will have a primary opponent in May.

    With so many tax dollars being generated through Jim Beam and the Cedar Grove distribution businesses, Branham said he feels his district is left out.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - A local girl who grew up in rural Bullitt County now takes on the task of directing businesses into the future.

    The Bullitt County Chamber of Commerce recently selected Anita Stump as its newest executive director.

    Stump previously worked as member services director for the Bullitt County YMCA, with 20 years experience working with the organization.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE — Fashion, food and fitness. That’s what the annual Healthy Hearts Wear Red Luncheon is all about.

    Back for its eleventh year, residents and friends of Bullitt County are invited to learn how to give their heart its best life.

    “We all know somebody who has had a heart attack, a stroke or suffered from other heart issues,” Bullitt County Health Department Health Educator Liz McGuire said. 

  •  PIONEER VILLAGE - It was a long journey from Bullitt County to Okinawa, Japan for George Bradbury.

    It was an even longer journey for Bradbury to Washington DC, a journey that took a lifetime to experience.

    Bradbury, 92, recently participated in the Honor Flight Program, an organization dedicated to transporting veterans to the nation’s capitol, free of charge, to visit war memorials dedicated to them.

    Born in 1925 and raised in Belmont, Bradbury did his part to receive such honor, surviving some of World War II’s deadliest battles.