Today's Features

  •  Six individuals were remembered during a recent rally to stop drug overdoses.

    Those highlighted were recent victims to the illness that fuels drug overdoses, especially heroin.

    The Walking for Wellness Stop Heroin Bullitt County organization sponsored the event. It hosts walks and other activities throughout the community to raise awareness.

  •   BARDSTOWN -- In a world of dying farms and dying families, one Bardstown couple hopes to bring the closeness back with their first full-length feature film “The Old Winter.”

    “The Old Winter” is a historically based drama that sheds a light on the disappearance of small farms by following Asa Bodine as he returns to his inherited Kentucky farmland 40 years after he left during the Depression.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - Thanks to a local organization’s efforts in promoting heathy lifestyle choices, Bullitt Countians can continue to strive for better health.

    For five years the Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency (KIPDA) has funded a rural diabetes coalition in Bullitt, Henry and Shelby Counties with a $2.5 million grant provided by the Center for Disease Control (CDC).

    Grant funding provided educational tools, civic events and moral support to county residents hoping to handle, or even avoid, diabetes.

  •  BROOKS -- The days of June Cleaver may have been replaced with Real Housewives, but that doesn’t mean everyone has forgotten what it takes to run a good home.

    Reba Mills, 86, definitely hasn’t forgotten and works to ensure the community stays educated through the Bullitt County Extension Homemaker Association (BCEHA).

    Mary Evelyn Farmer hosted her first meeting in Brooks in 1947, which would become the BCEHA.

    Farmer was the one who first told Mills, a housewife with two sons, about the Homemakers in the ‘50s.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Bullitt Lick Middle’s eighth-grade science teacher Kayla Alcorn has teaching in her blood.

    “I am the daughter of a teacher,” Alcorn said. “I’ve been around education my whole life so I think that makes me a little more comfortable with it being my first year.”

    Alcorn attended the University of Kentucky with a pre-dental mindset before deciding a teaching career was better suited for her.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON -- The city of Mount Washington is about to get a whole lot healthier and the White House has taken notice!

    Councilmember Alice Harris has been invited to the White House in September after applying for the “Let’s Move! Cities, Towns and Counties” (LMCTC) program.

    The LMCTC initiative grew out of the Let’s Move! program launched by First Lady Michelle Obama in an effort to help encourage healthy and active lifestyles for children across America so that those children can grow up healthier and pursue their dreams.

  •  Gwinn Hahn was recently honored by the Kentucky Retired Teaches Association District Five as its volunteer of the year.

    The majority of her volunteer hours were devoted to the Bowman Valley Schoolhouse Project.

    She gave an update of the progress to save and renovate the last African-American schoolhouse in the county.

    It is now located next to the Bullitt County Board of Education office.

    Hahn is presented with her award by Fifth District president Allen Schuler. Both educators retired from Bullitt Central High School.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON  -- While on a fishing trip at Kentucky Lake, Mount Washington resident David Sullivan won with a prize larger than the bluegill he was fishing for: an all-expense paid Elk Hunt.

    “He never buys anything like this because he never wins,” David’s wife, Vivian, said. “He just got lucky this time. It took him 70 years.”

    A single $10 raffle ticket bought Sullivan the winning ticket for the 2015 Masonic Elk Tag Hunt.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE -- After his first year teaching in Henry County, Bullitt Central High School freshman math teacher Liam Corley wanted a larger challenge. 

    “It wasn’t the perfect fit for me,” he said. “As of right now, I think I’ve found it.”

    A native of Chicago, Corley went to a school similar to Bullitt Central in size and school spirit, but the city community was a different than the country-style of Bullitt County schools.

    Corley left Chicago to study at the University of Louisville.

  •  Over 100 vehicles came to the Shepherdsville City Park on Saturday to show off their classic cars, trucks and motorcycles.

    They also came with a purpose - to help raise money for the restoration of the Bowman Valley Schoolhouse.

    Today’s Kids in Shepherdsville sponsored the car show in an effort to generate funds to complete the restoration of the last African-American schoolhouse in the county.

    It is presently located next to the board of education office on Highway 44 East.