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Today's Features

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - As the month of September began, the Kentucky Department for Public Health issued an advisory pertaining to a rash of overdoses involving heroin laced with another drug, fentanyl.

    As the month of August ended, two local organizations continued their struggle to educate the community on the dangers of heroin and other abused substances.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Each year, the Bullitt County Scottish Rite organization looks to honor individuals.

    The individuals honored are those who happen to be citizens who make the community a better place.

    The organization also honors one of its own.

    Recently, three individuals were honored.

    Starting his Masonic career in southern Indiana, Herman Schlageter crossed the river and settled in Kentucky.

    Eight years ago, he married the former Joan French.

  •     The 2016-2017 school year began with special honors for one elementary school music teacher.
        Stacey Stults was named District V Music Teacher of the Year by the Kentucky Music Educators Association (KMEA). She has taught music for 16 year investing time at Lebanon Junction and Nichols Elementary Schools before joining the Shepherdsville Elementary School staff when the doors opened in 2005.

  •     MOUNT WASHINGTON— Injured squirrels, rabbits, raccoons, opossums and bats have a new home in Mount Washington.
        Started in 2009, Second Chances Wildlife Center is a 501c3 clinic whose mission is to conserve wildlife through rehabilitation and education.
        “More and more, as animals are losing their habitats, they’re forced to come in closer and closer to humans,” founder Brigette Williams said, adding that 90 percent of what the organization gets in is due to human encroachment.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 5710 in Shepherdsville greeted some special guests at its headquarters.

    The Post welcomed VFW National Commander-in-Chief Brian Duffy and Kentucky State Commander James Curry to a special luncheon.

    Post 5710 Commander Jimmy Anderson said the dignitaries were visiting the area as part of a tour of various Kentucky post locations.

  •  The city of Hillview recently hosted a bike and skate rally.

    Several youngsters brought their bikes to engraved for identification.

    Others got to select a bike from those which had been recovered or abandoned.

    There was food and music available.

    However, due to a low turnout, there will be a second opportunity.

    The next bike and skate rally will be on Saturday, Sept. 24, starting at 10 a.m. At Noon, there will be a bike ride led by the police department.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE -- When Bullitt County government inherited an emergency medical service 25 years ago, Bridgett Etherton was there.

    Mike Phillips, who has been the Bullitt County EMS director since its inception, said his friendship with Etherton goes back even further.

    So on a day in which she was honored on her service and her retirement, it was an emotional moment for Phillips.

    “She’s been my sounding board,” said Phillips. “She’s been my venting board.”

  •  On July 31, Shirley Lakes presented her annual summer piano recital at Vine Hill Baptist Church in Clermont.

    Volunteers particitating included Audrey Greenwell, Jazmin Colville, Lilah Cash, Isabella Cape, Sarah Simpson, Daniel Bandy, Brian Simpson, Hannah Hatfield, Tatum St. Clair, Hannah Kingrey, Rachel Hasty, Emily Bickel, Riley Delk, Travis Ray, Caroline McCrorey and Rachel McCrorey.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - August 31 is designated as International Overdose Awareness Day. Two local agencies were hoping to raise awareness leading up to the important date by hosting The Big Purple Event.

    Co-sponsored by Walking for Wellness Stop Heroin Bullitt County and the Bullitt Opioid Addiction Team (BOAT), The Big Purple Event featured guest speakers, live entertainment and vendor booths featuring regional organizations that are dealing with drug abuse and addiction issues.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON— When Sally McConnell’s seven-year-old granddaughter, Morgan, first saw flames coming from her grandma’s horse barn in early June, her first thoughts went to her pony, Mr. Freckles.

    “My granddaughter went in when she saw it sparking instead of coming to get me and tried to get her pony out,” the Rolling Hills Farm owner said. “He made it about to the first post.”