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Today's Features

  •  To prepare middle school students for learning in the technology age for both college and their future, BCPS students in grades 6-8 are receiving Chromebooks for the 2017-2018 school year.

    Chromebooks are simply laptops that connect wirelessly to the Internet and used mainly web based applications including Google Classroom.

    District Technology Coordinator Jim Jackson described the value of adding more grades.

  •  Thomas R. Jasper, 86, of Mount Washington, went home to be with the Lord on Thursday, July 20, 2017.

    He was a man of solid faith and a loving, dedicated family man. As an active, lifelong member of First Baptist Church Mt. Washington, he served as deacon and on various committees.

  •  A man who has served the community for over 40 years has died.

    James Allen Enlow, 67, of Shepherdsville, passed away Wednesday, July 19, 2017, at Robley Rex VA Medical Center.

    Enlow was a member of Calvary Road Baptist Church. He was a former Shepherdsville Police officer and served as chief for a short time. He was also a former chief of the Shepherdsville Fire Department as well as a Bullitt County EMT.

    A Navy Seal and Vietnam veteran, Enlow was awarded the Silver Star, Gold Star and Purple Heart.

  •  Kentucky’s 2017 History Teacher of the Year is Jennifer Faith of Eastside Middle School.

    “To be honest, I had put this award out of my mind because my application was submitted back in March,” she said. “I didn’t think that I had a chance but I was thankful for the acknowledgement. When I reviewed the email stating that I won, I was stunned and I am still in shock!”

    Faith appreciates the confidence of her principal, Troy Wood, who initiated the process which culminated in the award.

  •  FRANKFORT — Kentucky high school students and 2017 graduates should check their Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES) accounts for accuracy.

    KEES allows students to earn money for college by getting good grades in high school and for qualifying scores on the ACT or SAT. 

    Students eligible for free or reduced lunches may also earn awards for good scores on Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate and Cambridge Advanced International exams. 

  •  Erik Huber looks forward to Aug. 9th when he will greet Bullitt Central High School students as their new principal.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON — Taking on extra responsibility in the workplace can be a difficult transition for anyone but, when that extra responsibility is 18 extra students, a teacher has to be on top of her game.

    Luckily for students at Old Mill Elementary, Rachel Ellis was ready for the challenge when she moved from her previous Jefferson County position of working one-on-one with six special education students to being a teacher to a full classroom of first grade and kindergarten students last September.

  •  Bullitt Lick Middle School hosted a Summer Reading Party for all students and their families, including incoming sixth graders.

    The event included fun and games and a free cookout meal, along with an opportunity to collect new t-shirts and meet members of the BLMS staff.

    Fun activities were provided courtesy of the Bullitt County YMCA and Games 2U Mobile Entertainment.

    The Bullitt County Public Library and the Dream Express mobile library also attended, promoting summertime reading and education.

  •  Ella Witt and Hunter Trammell were accepted into the 2017 Kentucky Governor’s School for the Arts.

    From mid-June through early July, Ella studied musical theater while Hunter focused on drama at Centre College in Danville. They were among 256 Kentucky students chosen for this summer’s GSA.

    Ella is the 15 year-old daughter of Eve and Mark Witt and a senior at North Bullitt High School. She performed the lead in the 2015 summer musical Legally Blonde Jr. 

  •  HEBRON ESTATES— The students aren’t the only ones that learn something each school year. Teachers are constantly learning, especially in their first year.

    Like North Bullitt High art teacher Kayla Greene, who spent her first year as a teacher experimenting with new techniques and learning just as much about herself as her students learned about art.