• MW looking at ways to keep things out of its sewer plant

     MOUNT WASHINGTON — It’s a dirty topic but it has to be discussed: flushable toiletry wipes are not as flushable as they seem.

    Letters were recently sent out to Mount Washington residents on the city’s sewer system explaining the harmful effects of flushing anything but toilet paper down the pipes.

    Lift station supervisor Wayne Votaw also spoke at a recent council meeting to help get the point across a little more with videos and pictures taken by his crews of the tangled mess the wipes have caused the workers.

  • BEHS students rally to remember

     MOUNT WASHINGTON—The deadly shooting in Marshall County earlier this year hit too close to home for those at Bullitt East High.

    Alum Scott Cosner is the father of twin boys who attend Marshall County High. On Jan. 23, one son was shot in the back of the neck while students trying to escape trampled the other.

    Both boys have recovered and made a special appearance at Bullitt East on Wednesday as part of an assembly organized by the student-led newspaper, the Livewire.

  • Medical Marijuana: Fiscal Court changes mind, drops support

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Government officials can always change their minds.


    A couple of weeks after passing a resolution to endorse legislative action to approve medical marijuana in Kentucky, Bullitt Fiscal Court members decided to change their minds.

    With Dr. Lee Watts, chaplain to the state capitol but is not a state employee, giving a presentation and with several local ministers in the audience, court members voted 4-1 to rescind its prior resolution.

  • BBB Hot Topics: March 2018

     Take a look at BBB’s hot topics for March 2018!

  • Former golf course to become site of upscale housing units

     HILLVIEW -- Those who used to play the Maplehurst Golf Course know that the facility has been closed for a couple of years.

    The course will now be refurbished as a residential community if the city of Hillview approves the zoning request of Robert and Kay Tyler.

    The owners are seeking to rezone 95.9 acres to R-1 Residential and a 2.61-acre portion to B-2 Central Business.

    The property is located off Bells Mill Road.

  • Lebanon Junction to start Tuesday meetings earlier

     LEBANON JUNCTION — Earlier meetings could be in the works for Lebanon Junction.

    Councilmember Tim Sanders proposed the times of the automatically moved holiday meetings be changed to 6 p.m. instead of 7 p.m. Currently, the regular scheduled city council meetings are the first Monday of each month at 7 p.m. at city hall, unless there is a holiday in which case the meeting gets moved to 7 p.m. on the following Tuesday.

    Due to other commitments, Sanders suggested the ordinance read those Tuesday meetings occur a little earlier.

  • County mid-term financials on par

     SHEPHERDSVILLE — While the big white elephant in the room remains the impact on pension costs, Bullitt County’s mid-year financial report shows that the budget numbers were pretty close.

    Chief finance officer Keith Griffee recently outlined the budget picture for the end of the first six months of the fiscal year. And, things weren’t too bad.

    In terms of revenue, the current fiscal year had receipts of over $16.9 million through the end of December.

    That compares to the $16.1 million generated at the same time a year ago.

  • State to supply funds to resurface 21 roads

     SHEPHERDSVILLE — The county motorists will see improvements over the course of the next year to a number of roads through a state funding program.

    The projects will be funded through the state Rural Secondary Road program.

    Road foreman Hyte Rouse said 21 projects are slated for resurfacing. The state will pay up to $398,937 for the improvements. The county would be responsible for any cost overruns.

    Bullitt Fiscal Court members approved the list of roads to be resurfaced either by the county crew or contracted companies.

  • BBB warns of storm chasers

     LOUISVILLE – The recent damage done by floods in Greater Louisville and Southern Indiana brings out the best in people, as strangers reach out to help others in need. Unfortunately, the aftermath of a crisis also brings out contractors who take advantage of those who have already been victimized.

    As a follow up, your local Better Business Bureau is warning local residents affected by the recent flooding to beware of storm chasers and out-of-town contractors soliciting business.

  • Sholar wants to use experience in sheriff’s office

     MOUNT WASHINGTON — While Walter Sholar may have dreamed of being county attorney while in high school, his first love may have been law enforcement.

    At the age of 21, Sholar applied  for a position with the old Louisville Police Department.

    However, a hiring freeze was in place, so Sholar went on to become a lawyer.

    He became Bullitt County attorney but the love of law enforcement never left him.

    Now, Sholar is seeking the Republican nomination to be the next Bullitt County sheriff.