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Business

  • Cancer fund-raiser big success for Hillview group

     HILLVIEW - A car show continues to drive Hillview’s efforts toward finding a cure for cancer.

    Resident Richard Luce, chairperson of the 3rd annual Cancer Awareness and Train Show fundraising event, addressed the Hillview City Council to discuss this year’s success.’

    According to Luce, this year’s event included 68 classic cars, 86 model cars, 45 vendors and 16 co-sponsors. He mentioned that the event doubled in size this year.

  • Lawsuit filed on past due garbage accounts in Shep.

     SHEPHERDSVILLE — There have been concerns over unpaid garbage bills that date back to 2012.

    Those concerns have now resulted in a lawsuit.

    Eco-Tech LLC recently filed a lawsuit in Bullitt Circuit Court demanding the city of Shepherdsville pay over $143,000 in unpaid garbage bills as of June 20, 2017.

    The current contract is scheduled to terminate on Sept. 20, 2017, and the city is accepting bids on a revised ordinance.

  • Bullitt County continues to prosper thanks to tourism-related activities

     SHEPHERDSVILLE — Tourism isn’t all billboards and brochures.

    In Bullitt County, tourism means jobs, outsider spending, tax spending and community growth.

    A study conducted by Certec, Inc. of Versailles reported that tourism supported 1,746 jobs in Bullitt County, down 155 from last year. However, daily, $91,226 is generated from those jobs to worker paychecks, up from $86,116 last year.

  • Officials look to tell story about county’s success

      SHEPHERDSVILLE -- When Kenny Hester brings in applicants for major jobs in his company, he finds there is a bit of a surprise.

    And the biggest surprise is the quality of the education system.

    “That’s a huge blessing,” said Hester.

    That was part of the discussion of the Bullitt County Economic Authority during a recent meeting.

    Not only did the discussion talk about the county’s strides, it also outlined several accomplishments highlighted in the  June edition of Southern Business Development magazine.

  • Mixed reaction to MW road decision

    MOUNT WASHINGTON— The city of Mount Washington is tired of waiting.

    Since 1962, the city has asked to have Highway 44 widened.

    Now, in 2017, the road is worse off than ever.

    “I’m sick and tired of waiting,” mayor Barry Armstrong said. “That’s all we’ve been doing.”

  • Honeymoon hits bit of rough spot in Shep.

     SHEPHERDSVILLE — After a relatively smooth transition over the past seven months, a bit of friction surfaced at the most recent Shepherdsville City Council meeting.

    Much of the differences seemed to stem from the powers of the executive and legislative branches of city government.

    Councilmember Bonnie Enlow inquired whether mayor Curtis Hockenbury told employees to not talk with city councilmembers.

    She asked if the mayor had such a right.

  • Mayor refutes statement that no progress has been made

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- When a councilmember stated that the city hadn’t moved forward, mayor Curtis Hockenbury shook his head.

    After being appointed last fall to serve the final year of the mayor’s term, Hockenbury felt the city had been making strides.

    “People wanted stability in city government,” said Hockenbury. “We’ve done that.”

  • Could this be last budget Parker has to worry about in Hunters Hollow?

    HUNTERS HOLLOW - It could be the last city budget mayor Linda Parker ever has to worry about it… and there wasn’t too much to worry about.

    The Hunters Hollow City Commission unanimously approved the city’s 2017-18 fiscal year budget ordinance, which goes into effect July 1.

    The budget will carry over around $135,000 in available resources, along with $30,000 in its Municipal Road Aid fund (MARF).

  • LJ employees to see hike in their pay for fiscal year

    LEBANON JUNCTION— After five years, Lebanon Junction city employees will get a little extra something in their wallets.

    Mayor Larry Dangerfield suggested a 50-cent raise for all city employees, which comes to $1,040 additional each year. Dangerfield confirmed the money was already in the budget, he just wanted the council’s agreement on the long-awaited increase.

    Dangerfield also asked the council to consider raising the cap on the police chief’s salary. The raise would be on the ordinance, not the chief’s paycheck. 

  • Just a minute: Council takes time in giving OK to different look to minutes

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- What is the value in having recorded minutes from governmental meetings?

    They document actions taken by that governmental body.

    But what if you are an elected official who has become accustomed to getting minutes to approve, and those minutes were basically word for word of what happened at the previous meeting, and what you received was not what you expected?

    You would raise a question?