.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Business

  • Pioneer Village closer to giving golf carts on-street privileges

      PIONEER VILLAGES - Golf cart owners in Pioneer Village are now worried about hitting 18 holes in the city’s roadway system.

    City attorney Mark Edison presented the first reading of a proposed ordinance to allow the use of golf carts on city streets.

    Edison presented a general copy of an ordinance to allow the city council members an opportunity to suggest changes or concerns.

    Council member Peggy Druin said important rules should include age restrictions of drivers, and rules against altering a cart to travel at higher speeds.

  • Request made to extend time to sell alcohol in county seat

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- For a small business owner, losing a potential revenue stream of $31,000 is a tough pill to swallow.

    But that is what Tom Chamberlain, owner of Lights Out Bar and Grill, estimates he has lost due to the current selling hours for alcohol.

    The current alcohol sales stop at midnight on Friday and Saturday and start at 2 p.m. on Sundays.

  • Don’t be blinded by an eclipse scam

     The solar eclipse is now just days away, and BBB serving Louisville, Southern Indiana, and Western Kentucky is reminding consumers to think smart while preparing for this event. While this is an exciting time, scammers may try to take advantage of the situation.

  • Permit not needed for Yorkshire business

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- An anticipated controversial conditional-use application was anything but that on Thursday.

    With the applicant, Stephen and Sarah Smith, having operated over 11 years on property off Yorkshire Boulevard, the Bullitt County Board of Adjustments ruled that no conditional-use permit was required.

    Smith operates a concrete business were trucks and materials are stored.

    Martin Whelan, a neighbor, complained to Bullitt Fiscal Court about the business operating in a residential area.

  • Beam hopes to add 9-10 warehouses in Bullitt

     LEBANON JUNCTION -- A major expansion of its bourbon aging warehouses is planned by Jim Beam Brands nears its Booker Noe facility in Boston.

    The final piece of that puzzle will be determined over the next month by Bullitt Fiscal Court.

    The 236-acre tract owned by Donald Samuels is seeking a zoning change from Conservation to Light Industrial. The Bullitt County Joint Planning commission gave a favorable recommendation, with fiscal court to make the final decision.

  • Energy plan helps Hillview new business recoup costs

     HILLVIEW —- As a company begins the construction of two large distribution warehouses, officials are also looking for a way to recoup some of its investment.

    But before the company can see a return on its investment, the Hillview City Council had to do a little paperwork.

    At a special meeting, the council approveda resolution allowing an Energy Project Assessment District.

    Matt Williams said that construction has begun on one of the two large distribution facilities sitting off East Blue Lick Road.

  • Hunters Hollow still looking for answers on sewer district

    HUNTERS HOLLOW - Like the Rolling Stones, the Hunters Hollow City Commission just can’t seem to get any satisfaction.

    Mayor Linda Parker inquired about updates to the ongoing situation involving potential surcharge rates to city residents due to a blown sewage treatment plant, followed by the sequential service takeover by the Bullitt County Sanitation District.

    City attorney Mark Edison said nothing else can happen until there was a decision made by the Kentucky Public Service Commission.

  • Fiscal Court won’t fight MW’s plans for permits

    SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Unless a project has started the permit process under the county’s watch, Mount Washington officials will now be in total control of construction.

    Bullitt Fiscal Court recently voted to not conduct any inspections through its code enforcement office if the work is located inside the city limits.

    The city of Mount Washington sent a letter to the county stating that it would be doing all building inspections as of July 28, 2017.

  • Mount Washington has own electrical inspector

     MOUNT WASHINGTON— When the city of Mount Washington gets tired of waiting, it takes matters into its own hands.

    Recently, the city council voted to approve the addition of an electrical inspector.

    “We were in situations a lot of times where we were having to wait for inspections,” mayor Barry Armstrong said.

    While the city previously had its own inspector for the smaller stuff, the county was the only option they had to rely to on.

  • Permits now to be handled in MW by own staff, board

     MOUNT WASHINGTON—Those who believe they have been wrongfully cited by the city of Mount Washington will soon have a chance to argue their case in front of a court of their peers.

    An ordinance was recently read for the first time to establish the Mount Washington Code Enforcement Board.