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Business

  • If there was snow this winter, Pioneer Village was prepared

     PIONEER VILLAGE - The Pioneer Village City Council has the city prepared for snow business, and helping out a neighboring city to boot.

    The council unanimously approved mayor Gary Hatcher’s purchase of a Henderson 2-cubic-yard salt spreader at a cost of $6,800.

    According to Hatcher, the spreader fits into the back of any dump truck. Because of the purchase, the council could surplus its current truck, a Dodge 2000 model.

    City attorney Mark Edison said the nearby city of Hunters Hollow was interested in purchasing the Dodge truck.

  • Hillview will allow county to pick up stray animals

     HILLVIEW - One way or another, the issue of picking up stray animals in the City of Hillview has apparently gone to the dogs.

    Mayor Jim Eadens said the repeal of city animal control warden and dog warden positions could take place by next month, with the first reading of the repeal scheduled for the city council’s March 21 business meeting.

    According to Eadens, repealing the legal positions would mean the city would not legally offer animal collection services, which would require Bullitt County Animal Control to respond to calls within the city.

  • Ideas plentiful for uses at Roby property

     SHEPHERDSVILLE --At one time, Bullitt County had ball fields which were busy all the time.

    They hosted national tournaments.

    But times have changed.

    With the construction of the new Roby Elementary taking the large baseball and softball fields, as well as concessions and rest room facilities, usage of the remaining fields has dwindled.

    The question posed by members of the Bullitt County Parks Commission was simple -- what would be the best uses of the remaining property?

  • Fireworks dealers feel Hillview plan goes too far

     HILLVIEW -- If the intent of the city’s proposed ordinance was to do away with all portable tent sales during the Fourth of July, mission may be accomplished.

    Several owners of tents located in the city of Hillview each summer came to voice their concerns over the council’s proposed ordinance regulating temporary businesses.

    While those who spoke during the recent caucus session understood the desire for more control, none felt the proposed ordinance was fair.

  • Shep. Council takes care of business

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- It was short but sweet.

    And it was vital to two major issues affecting the city of Shepherdsville.

    For the first time since Feb. 9, the Shepherdsville City Council held a meeting on Tuesday.

    The purpose of the special meeting was quite simple -- to allow the advertisement for bids on a major road project off Cedar Grove Road and to have the first reading of the flood ordinance.

    Mayor Brian James presided over the meeting as five of the councilmembers were in attendance.

  • Hunters Hollow officials still worried about possible surcharge

     HUNTERS HOLLOW - First the sewers failed. Then the potential for a major customer surcharge increase was suggested. Then the surcharge request was dismissed.

    Gathering their collective breaths, members of the Hunters Hollow City Commission stepped backward again, hearing about the potential for the return of a potential surcharge.

    City attorney Mark Edison said a case involving Bullitt Utilities, the previous long-time owner of the failed sewage treatment plant, could be reopened for legal purposes in Franklin Circuit Court.

  • Residents in MW area will have turn at property valuation study

     MOUNT WASHINGTON--  If you own property in the eastern part of Bullitt County, it is your time to be re-evaluated.

    Every four years, Bullitt County Property Valuation Administrator Bruce Johnson and his staff will look at property values in a particular quadrant.

    For Mount Washington, this is the year.

    During a recent meeting of the Mount Washington City Council, officials alerted residents in the area should be prepared.

    The vehicles are marked for easy identification if they are doing on-site inspections..

  • Special meeting Tuesday to deal with two issues

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- It appears there is a good chance that the Shepherdsville City Council will meet on Tuesday morning to deal with two pressing issues.

    The city has deadlines approaching on soliciting bids for the Alpha Way project off of Cedar Grove Road, as well as accepting the flood maps by April 5 so that the community can remain in the flood insurance program.

    The council has not met since Feb. 9. At that time, Brian James was selected to serve as mayor until after the November general election.

  • BBB Hot Topics: March 2016

     See the latest scams in BBB’s March 2016 Hot Topics

     

    1.    Local consumers are receiving postcards from the Compliance Division. The postcard says to “please call immediately” to avoid potential fees or penalties. A local consumer said he called and was told to pay $70 in order to “clear up a matter.” This is a scam. 

  • Despite objections on traffic, fiscal court approves rezoning for homes off Sunview

     MOUNT WASHINGTON -- Despite a number of residents in opposition, the Bullitt Fiscal Court voted unanimously to rezone property off Sunview Drive.

    C&M Renovations won approval to rezone 64 acres from Stream Valley Reserve and Agricultural to R-1 Residential.

    Depending on approvals from the health department, there could be up to 40 homes built on the tract, which runs along the Salt River.

    However, attorney Eric Farris said that number could be much lower.