.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Education

  • BULLITT COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS CALENDAR: OCTOBER 2014

     The Bullitt County Schools Calendar of Events for the month of October 2014. For more information call 869-8000 or visit the BCPS website.

    HOLIDAYS

    13

    COLUMBUS DAY -

    31

    HALLOWEEN - Friday

  • Central office remaned for longtime educator

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - Frank Hatfield was never one to like a lot of publicity for himself.

    He was always more worried about placing the focus on the students and ways to improve their educational opportunities.

    But, on Saturday, it was Frank Hatfield’s day.

    The Bullitt County Public School Board unanimously agreed recently that the central office should now be known as the Frank R. Hatfield Administrative Center.

  • Barger comes home to lead Bullitt Lick Middle

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - One of Shepherdsville’s native sons, and a respected member of the Bullitt County Public Schools community, returns home to help educate his fellow residents.

    Lee Barger was named principal of Bullitt Lick Middle School, replacing Robert Fulk, who left at the beginning of the school year to fill the principal position at North Bullitt High School.

    The Bullitt Lick hiring brings Barger full circle on the educational level. He grew up attending Roby Elementary and the old Shepherdsville High School, graduating from Bullitt Central.

  • Plenty of fresh fruits, vegetables at Shepherdsville Elementary

     For the second time, Shepherdsville Elementary School has been selected to participate in Kentucky’s Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) implemented through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

    Over 500 students will enjoy a variety of fresh fruit and vegetables as a healthy afternoon snack during the 2014-2015 school year. The program is supported by about $20,000 in grant funds.

  • Bernheim looks good thanks to some friends

     CLERMONT - Bernheim Middle School Data Manager Rebecca Huffman believes landscaping spruces up a location.

    Seeing the weeds, older decaying mulch and gnarly tree limbs around the front façade area, Huffman decided it was time to refresh the area.

    “Work was needed,” she said. “It has been awhile since any landscaping was done.”

  • Retired Teachers to Rescue

     The Bullitt County Retired Teachers Association delivered school supplies to principal Sheri Hamilton of Nichols Elementary School.

    Carolyn Dennison, president of the BCRTA, and Janet Richardson, chairman of the community services committee of BCRTA, made the presentation of items.

  • Bullitt schools continue to see improvements in test scores

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - The game is still not over but the Bullitt County Public School District is running ahead of many of its fellow educators.

  • NB’s Clark spend summer helping form new social studies standards

     HEBRON ESTATES - North Bullitt High School teacher Monica Clark spent her summer with 40 colleagues fleshing out new social studies standards that will be used by a generation of students.

    “This project was, by far, the most challenging and rewarding work that I have ever had the privilege to be a part of throughout my career as a social studies educator,” she said. “These new social studies standards will empower both students and teachers and will be transformational.”

  • Leadership week helps area elementary principals

     LEBANON JUNCTION - It’s no secret it takes good leadership to run an excellent school.

    And, this summe,r two Bullitt County school principals spent time studying just that.

    Crossroads Elementary principal Julie Skeens and Lebanon Junction Elementary principal Patrick Durham spent four days in Greensboro, N.C., at the Kentucky Chamber Foundation’s Leadership Institute for School Principals.

  • TAX APPROVED: School tax rate to increase following 3-2 board vote

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - By a split 3-2 vote, the Bullitt County Public School Board opted to accept a proposed tax increase on real estate when bills are mailed out in the next few days.

    In accepting the 4 percent increase in tax revenue, which is the most allowed without being subject to public recall, the real estate property tax will rise from 61.8 cents per $100 of assessed value to 64.2 cents.

    For example, someone with a $100,000 home would pay $24 per year more in real estate taxes.