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Education

  • Another "look-alike" weapon found at BCHS

      The following was a letter emailed to Bullitt Central High School parents from principal Jim Beavers in regards to a look-alike weapon found on campus Monday:

    This morning, at Bullitt Central High School, we had another look-alike weapon brought to school.  Again, it was a look-alike weapon and there has been no firearm at BC.

  • Can’t smoke’em even if you got them

                    SHEPHERDSVILLE -- It was probably a rule that most thought had been in effect for years.
        However, it wasn’t until recently that the Bullitt County Public School Board ruled that it was illegal to smoke on its properties — including during extra-curricular activities.
        For Sarah Smith, the district’s safe and drug free schools coordinator, the new smoke-free policy is long overdue.

  • Minnis makes right moves as educator named tops in state

     HEBRON ESTATES - Whether it’s the strategy of a chess board move or the skill of saving up energy for the end of the cross-country run, Dennis Minnis knows how to teach and motivate his students.

    As a long-time Bullitt County Public Schools educator, Minnis tries to assist in the physical education at all schools and education levels.

    His efforts were recognized by the Kentucky Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (KAHPERD), which selected Minnis as the 2016-17 Elementary School PE Teacher of the Year.

  • 2016-17 Teen Court members begin their work

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- This year’s group of high school students who are part of the Teen Court program were recently sworn in.

    Bullitt County is one of just 22 Teen Court programs in the entire state of Kentucky.

    This real-life program allows juvenile offenders to have their case heard before a jury of their peers.

    The punishment given by the Teen Court members  is binding.

  • Greene survives first-day jitters to settle into job

     HEBRON ESTATES — First-day jitters are to be expected, especially when someone starts a new school.

    Even more so when that someone is a first year teacher with 120 pairs of eyes watching her every move.

    North Bullitt art teacher Kayla Greene felt the jitters and then some on her first day.

    “Everyone here has been super great, super helpful and very nice, but they aren’t necessarily my comfort zone,” she said.

    After a 14-hour day, Greene drove home and cried when she saw her husband.

  • Avoid mistakes when accepting financial aid for college students

     Many students spend more for college than they should by making some common mistakes when seeking financial aid. 

    Follow these tips from the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA) to make sure you get the help you need.

  • BC FFA busy during fall season; students are recognized

     The Bullitt Central FFA Chapter are teaching kids to get involved.  To start, several students participated in the Kentucky Farm Bureau Outstanding Youth contest. 

    Students spent many hours preparing speeches on various agriculture topics to be given in front of a large audience. 

    We want to recognize from left to right wearing their FFA jacket (Chrissie White, Olivia Lile, Jacqueline Goff, and Courtney Hughes) for taking the time to prepare and represent our Chapter. 

  • Geometric path leads Headley to teaching career

        SHEPHERDSVILLE—On her first day as an eighth grade geometry student, Chassidy Headley’s teacher did something that would stick with her students the rest of their lives: she connected geometry to the real world.
        Years later, a now grown Headley hopes to connect to her seventh grade students the same way.
        “I think, if we can make those connections, they might actually like it and might be more engaged,” the Bullitt Lick Middle teacher said.

  • Parents need to watch signs displayed by kids

     Parents: PAY ATTENTION! 

    A recent article in the New York Times noted recent statistics showing that children aged 10 to 14 (roughly the ages of our middle school students) are as likely to die from suicide as from traffic accidents. 

    There is no acceptable rate of death for children, but the article points out that death among that age group is pretty rare for all causes.  

    Even so, traffic accidents used to account for four times more deaths than suicide back in 1999.  Now, it is almost the same. 

  • Salute to the veterans at Cedar Grove and Lebanon Junction Elementary

     CEDAR GROVE - No one can tell history better than someone who actually lived it.

    Veterans from throughout Bullitt County converged at Lebanon Junction and Cedar Grove Elementary to share their stories and recollections from their days serving with the United States Armed Forces.

    Fifth graders at each school gathered around the luminaries as they shared experiences ranging from the recent Gulf War back to World War II.