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Education

  • Taking a Pie in the Face for Operation Santa

      Overdale Elementary was the first school to contribute toys to the Hillview Operation Santa program over 25 years ago. It remains the biggest school contributor.

    Over 400 families receive food baskets and toys thanks to the generosity of the community.

    This year, Overdale students had an opportunity to throw pies at area police officers and even Whitney Voyles, whose class donated the most toys. This earned her a pie.

  • Moral instruction to be allowed

     MOUNT WASHINGTON -- You might not be able to bring religious-based groups into a public school but you can now take students to the place of worship.

    The Bullitt County Public School Board voted to allow students from Eastside Middle to participate in an off-campus setting that will allow for moral instruction.

    Hope City will oversee the program and students must have parents’ consent to participate.

  • Cedar Grove gets early Christmas present in form of 40 new ukuleles

     CEDAR GROVE - How’d you like to spend Christmas on Christmas Island?

    Cedar Grove students can do the next best thing: They can play the famous island tune on 40 brand new ukuleles.

    Kala Brand Music Company donated 40 Kala Waterman ukuleles to Cedar Grove as part of a recent contest, an estimated value of about $1,600.

    Cedar Grove music instructor Rebecca Dennis found out the contest by following the Kala company on Facebook. She said the company has offered many contests for free instruments but not to this scale.

  • Brooks’ Born Learning Academy starts early learning

     BROOKS - For many educators, a child’s learning can’t begin soon enough.

    At Brooks Elementary, they even prefer the children to be born learning.

    The school received a Born Learning Academy grant provided by Metro United Way and Toyota.

    According to MUW, almost half of the students entering kindergarten are at risk or behind in their educational preparedness. The program was designed, based on research, to help prepare both students and families.

  • Bullitt Central officials investigate threat

      The following is an email message from Bullitt Central High School principal James Beavers in regards to a threatening message found at the school on Wednesday:

     

    Dear Parents and Partners of Bullitt Central High School,

  • Overflow crowd enjoys present, past BCHS choir

      SHEPHERDSVILLE - Yuletide carols being sung by an alumni choir led to folks dressed up like eskimos filling the pews of the First Baptist Church in Shepherdsville.

    The church was the setting for a combination Christmas choir concert performed by the Bullitt Central High School Choir along with the Bullitt Central Alumni Choir.

    The event featured the school’s current choir and Freshman choir, consisting of about 100 students. It also featured Bullitt Central choir alumni, also numbering at about 100 singers.

  • Ellis gets off to good, but late, start at Old Mill

      MOUNT WASHINGTON — Just because school started in August for most of the county doesn’t mean it started for everybody.

    It didn’t start for Old Mill Elementary’s newest first grade teacher, Rachel Ellis, until the last few days of September.

  • Cedar Grove seeks ukuleles

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - At Cedar Grove Elementary, faculty and staff hope to spend Christmas like they're on Christmas Island.

  • Another "look-alike" weapon found at BCHS

      The following was a letter emailed to Bullitt Central High School parents from principal Jim Beavers in regards to a look-alike weapon found on campus Monday:

    This morning, at Bullitt Central High School, we had another look-alike weapon brought to school.  Again, it was a look-alike weapon and there has been no firearm at BC.

  • Can’t smoke’em even if you got them

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- It was probably a rule that most thought had been in effect for years.

    However, it wasn’t until recently that the Bullitt County Public School Board ruled that it was illegal to smoke on its properties — including during extra-curricular activities.

    For Sarah Smith, the district’s safe and drug free schools coordinator, the new smoke-free policy is long overdue.

    “Many people assumed that these policies mean that smoking was prohibited at all times,” said Smith. “This was not the case.”