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Education

  • Survey open for public opinion on school times

      SHEPHERDSVILLE -- For parents, grandparents, students, teachers, custodians, bus drivers and the general public, this is your call to action.

    How you feel about starting elementary school classes at 7:40 a.m.?

    What about high school students no starting classes 70 minutes later than the current time?

    And what if middle school students become the last to start classes at 9:15 a.m.?

    That is the proposal favored by a committee challenged to look at start times in the Bullitt County Public SchoolSystem.

  • Mt. Washington Middle to see Irish footwork

     Louisville Irish Dancers will perform at Mt. Washington Middle School Tuesday, March  17,  at 9 a.m.

    Youth Service Center Coordinator Megan Hatter said the dancers will not only demonstrate the fancy footwork of the Irish but use their appearance as a teachable moment.

    “This is certainly an exciting opportunity to highlight the performance in honor of St. Patrick’s Day while capturing the arts in education,” she said. Over 550 students, several family and many staff members will compose the audience.

  • Bickett excels as teacher at her alma mater

     HEBRON ESTATES - Occasionally in sports the Most Valuable Player will also make the best play of the season.

    North Bullitt High School teacher Christy Bickett was crucial in one of the top moments of the past school year, when her AP Calculus class won the TI-Nspire Express Your Selfie Contest hosted by Texas Instruments, with the class receiving a live Skype interview with actress Mayim Bialik from “The Big Bang Theory.”

  • Students can reach FAME with training

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - It's not necessarily for students who want to live forever or learn how to fly, but it is for select students seeking further specialized advancement within specific career paths.

    The Kentucky Federation for Advanced Manufacturing Education (FAME) program features a combination of on-the-job training with college courses that allow the students better access to advanced higher-paying jobs.

  • Teaching truly sweet music to Patton’s ears

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - Bullitt Lick Middle music instructor Meredith Patton remembered the e-mail from principal Lee Barger at 6:50 a.m. on a Friday.

    “He asked me if the band can play at a morning ceremony,” she said.

    The mother of three was frantic, getting her son ready for school while texting members of the BLMS band, telling them to meet her at school with their instruments ready.

    When she arrived, she told the students they would perform in 10 minutes.

  • Beasley follows heart by going into teaching

     BROOKS - Some believe they are born to teach; others feel they should pursue other career paths. On occasion, someone might do both.

    Brooks Elementary teacher Gina Beasley did, switching gears from a decade-long business profession to begin a teaching career.

    Beasley made the right move for herself personally, as well as for the district, proven by her selection as the Bullitt County Public Schools 2015 Elementary Teacher of the Year.

  • Students have choice of reaching greatness

     One of my favorite leadership researchers is Jim Collins, who wrote a classic business book called Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don’t.

    In that book, you can find the following sentence: “Greatness is not a function of circumstance. Greatness, it turns out, is largely a matter of conscious choice, and discipline.

    This can be applied to far more than making a business successful.

  • Discovery students hear from U of L president, local grad

      HEBRON ESTATES -- It was difficult to decide who might have been smiling the most.

    It could have been University of Louisville president James Ramsey and his staff.

    Or it could have been members of the Bullitt County Public School System.

    Ramsey made a recent visit to several of the programs now underway in Bullitt County.

  • Close the Deal to be directed by Higher Ed group

     FRANKFORT -- The popular Close the Deal program has been transferred from the Lieutenant Governor’s Office to the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA).

    Close the Deal helps high school seniors make the transition to college or careers. It recruits community and business leaders to foster a college-going culture at their local schools.

    Lt. Gov. Crit Luallen said she will continue to support the program because she believes that it is important to the Commonwealth.

  • Crossroads receives grant to create, host robotics film fest

     A Kentucky Society for Technology in Education (KySTE) grant of nearly $20,000 has been awarded to Crossroads Elementary School for students to design, create and host a robotics film festival.

    KySTE offered $100,000 to any school district in an outreach offering for the 2014-2015 school year. Only six schools earned grants, including Crossroads.

    Music teacher Amy Cuenca and Science teacher Jaymee Clemens will use the funds to purchase Lego Mindstorm robotics kits along with 30 iPads, 30 iPad covers for protection of the devices and 30 iMovie apps.