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Today's News

  • McCracken Co. attorney guilty of defrauding clients

     PADUCAH – A licensed Kentucky attorney pleaded guilty in United States District Court today, before Senior Judge Thomas B. Russell, to various charges including devising a scheme to defraud numerous clients of insurance settlements totaling at least $550,000 announced United States Attorney John E. Kuhn, Jr.

  • Woman caught by police after short chase

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- A local woman led police on a two-county pursuit.

    Shepherdsville Police officers were called to the 100 Block of Omicron Court Saturday, Aug. 12.

    There was a report to Central Dispatch that a disorderly female was at that location and she had active warrants.

    Officer Mike Smith stopped Mandy Cox, 35, of Shepherdsville. However, she then fled on Omega Parkway.

  • Casey Co. man guilty of defrauding Farm Credit Administration

     BOWLING GREEN –  A Casey County, Kentucky, man pled guilty today in United States District Court before District Judge Greg N. Stivers for his role in a conspiracy to defraud the Farm Credit Administration by concealing the sale of grain to unauthorized purchasers, announced United States Attorney John E. Kuhn, Jr.

  • Former LaRue Co. principal guilty of child porn

     LOUISVILLE – A former Larue County, Kentucky, High School Principal pleaded guilty today in United States District Court, before U.S. District Judge David J. Hale, to transporting child pornography and possessing child pornography that had been transported in interstate commerce announced United States Attorney John E. Kuhn, Jr.

  • Theft of tires paves road to jail for two suspects

     SHEPHERDSVILLE — Two individuals apparently needed some tires but didn’t have time to stay and have them installed… or time to pay for them.

    An apparent robbery at the Shepherdsville Big O store led police on a short chase before being apprehended without incident.

    Jerry Mumford, 36, of Shepherdsville and Shelley Clouse, 38, of Somerset were both arrested on Wednesday afternoon.

  • Fiscal Court won’t fight MW’s plans for permits

    SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Unless a project has started the permit process under the county’s watch, Mount Washington officials will now be in total control of construction.

    Bullitt Fiscal Court recently voted to not conduct any inspections through its code enforcement office if the work is located inside the city limits.

    The city of Mount Washington sent a letter to the county stating that it would be doing all building inspections as of July 28, 2017.

  • Permits now to be handled in MW by own staff, board

     MOUNT WASHINGTON—Those who believe they have been wrongfully cited by the city of Mount Washington will soon have a chance to argue their case in front of a court of their peers.

    An ordinance was recently read for the first time to establish the Mount Washington Code Enforcement Board.

  • Two dead in Nelson Co. after multiple vehicle collision

     BARDSTOWN - Kentucky State Police Post 4 Troopers responded to a multi vehicle fatal collision in Nelson Co. Friday evening.

  • Greenbrier group working to get improvements to its portion of road

     MOUNT WASHINGTON— Residents have rallied together to fix a failing road in Mount Washington.

    Greenbrier Road is an interesting one. If a driver turns onto it from Highway 44 and continue straight, it becomes Wales Run Road about a mile down. That straight strip is considered a state road.

    However, if a driver turns onto it from Highway 44 and curves with it before the bridge, the narrower Greenbrier Road is considered the county’s property.

  • Mount Washington has own electrical inspector

     MOUNT WASHINGTON— When the city of Mount Washington gets tired of waiting, it takes matters into its own hands.

    Recently, the city council voted to approve the addition of an electrical inspector.

    “We were in situations a lot of times where we were having to wait for inspections,” mayor Barry Armstrong said.

    While the city previously had its own inspector for the smaller stuff, the county was the only option they had to rely to on.