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Today's News

  • Public invited to be part of world tree hugging record

     CLERMONT --- To mark Earth Day, Bernheim officials hope to  break the world tree hugging record on June 4, 2016. 

    Dubbed the Bernheim Big Tree Hug Challenge, the Guinness World Record attempt will require at least 1,201 tree huggers to break the record of the most people hugging trees at the same time at the same location.

    Bernheim wants to attract upwards of 3,000 people to not only break the record, but to hold that title for years to come. South Korea holds the current world record.

  • Students will begin to have Chromebooks in lieu of textbooks

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- The maiden voyage of a pilot project to bring personal computers to students in the Bullitt County Public School System has been a success.

    Now, with the approval of the school board, more students will be giving up the textbooks and carrying their Chromebooks.

    Beginning next school year, over 3,200 students will be carrying their computers with them for the rest of their time in the local district.

  • Make your graduation plans as date set for June 4

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Barring anything unforeseen, the members of the Class of 2016 in Bullitt County will graduate on Saturday, June 4.

    The Bullitt County Board of Education approved the graduation dates on Monday.

    Greg Schultz, assistant superintendent for student learning, said that Broadbent Arena had again been secured for the ceremonies.

    North Bullitt will graduate at 11 a.m., followed by Bullitt Central at 2 p.m.

    The final commencement exercise of the day will be at 5 p.m. with Bullitt East.

  • Flood rule may jeopardize growth

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- It was unsettling for residents to be informed that many would now be part of the flood plain insurance program due to changing elevation maps.

    For the Shepherdsville properties, many saw the maps increase the flood elevation by six inches.

    What it also did was increase the level in which developers had to build any new structures.

    But, on top of that, the Shepherdsville City Council’s new flood plain building requirements made the ground floor be at least two feet above the new flood elevation.

  • MW still looking for ways to slow up traffic

     MOUNT WASHINGTON — When the Wilchar Estates neighborhood wants something done, residents won’t stop until they have a solution.

    Especially when the problem involves the safety of their children.

  • Homeless issue still on MUW mind

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - Last month the Metro United Way hosted a gathering of local officials and concerned citizens to discuss the state of homelessness in Bullitt County.

    A second meeting was hosted to further the concerns mentioned at the first meeting, in hopes of establishing a task force to address and solve local issues.

    Moderator Barbara Sexton-Smith, who has worked with homeless issues for the past 25 years, returned to discuss results from the first meeting.

  • School Board upset that work done without approval

     PIONEER VILLAGE -- The work had to be done.

    And it had to be done while school was not in session.

    But should it have been done without notifying school board members?

    The consensus during a recent work session of the Bullitt County Public School Board was that the sewer line work at Maryville Elementary was necessary.

    However, board members were not happy to get a negotiated change order for $21,000 from its contractor, Parco.

  • Couple continues battle to find comfort for daughter

     MOUNT WASHINGTON—At first glance, Leighanne Hastie looks like a regular 3-year-old.

    “Day to day, if you look at Leighanne, she looks like a normal little girl,” her mom, Heather, said. “She goes to gymnastics class on Mondays and she likes to go to her Bible class. She doesn’t look like a sick kid or one that has a disability.”

    The only difference comes in the form of a neurological disorder called epilepsy, which causes the toddler to have daily seizures.

  • Fired employee sues county, co-worker

      LOUISVILLE -- A former animal control officer has filed a federal lawsuit against his employer and a person who used to be his employee.

    Attorneys for James Edward Miller filed a federal civil lawsuit in U.S. District Court on Tuesday.

    The lawsuit names Bullitt Fiscal Court and Delsie Williams as defendants.

    On May 27, 2015, Miller and Williams were terminated as employees at the Bullitt County Animal Shelter.

  • Seven Counties, Centerstone join forces

     LOUISVILLE -- Centerstone and Seven Counties, two leading behavioral healthcare organizations, have signed a letter of intent to pursue an affiliation. 

    By joining together, the two organizations will be able to better meet the needs of people of all ages and expand access to innovative services and programs in each of the communities they serve and across the nation.