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Today's News

  • Grayson Co. police seek endangered missing juvenile

     CLARKSON - The Leitchfield Police Department, the Grayson County Sheriff’s Office, and other law enforcement agencies are currently searching for a missing juvenile.

    Sixteen-year-old Savanna C. Crawford was last seen leaving her residence located on Penner Drive in Leitchfield, KY at approximately 7:00 p.m. CT on Monday, April 10, 2017.

  • STAND OFF: Man captured, warrants served in MW

     MOUNT WASHINGTON— What started as a post-burglary search warrant quickly turned into a standoff situation.

    On Monday afternoon, two residences were broken into in the Treva Drive area.

    Due to several firearms being included in the list of stolen items, Louisville Metro Police was called in to assist with the high-risk search warrant on Tuesday, April 11, Daugherty said.

  • Woman enters plea in death of moped rider

     SHEPHERDSVILLE -- A Jefferson County woman may not face any additional jail time after entering a plea Tuesday in Bullitt Circuit Court.

    Emily Hickey entered a plea to reckless homicide and could be sentenced to five years in  prison. Final sentencing will be on May 15.

    However, probation will be recommended. If she does not violate her probation for five years, Hickey would not be subject to any additional jail time.

    In May 2016, Hickey was driving westbound in the eastbound lane in the early morning hours.

  • St. Clair enters plea agreement in ‘91 case

     ELIZABETHTOWN — A man who is already on death row in Kentucky for the 1991 murder of a Bardstown man recently entered a guilty plea on charges which occurred in Hardin County.

    Michael Dale St. Clair, who has also been convicted of murder charges in his home state of Oklahoma, accepted a guilty plea in Hardin County, according to state Attorney General Andy Besmear.

    On April 12, St. Clair entered a guilty plea to kidnapping, attempted murder, two counts of receiving stolen property and facilitation to arson.

  • City officials talk about chance of using food tax for projects

     SHEPHERDSVILLE— With nearly $900,000 in revenue from the restaurant tax each year, Shepherdsville councilmember Lisa Carter is looking for a way to use some of those funds for projects such as beautification.

    And, while the Shepherdsville council is looking at the issue, others are attending meetings hosted by the Shepherdsville-Bullitt County Tourist and Convention Commission.

    At a recent council meeting, Carter repeated an earlier idea of revising the current setup.

  • Tourism continues to grow in Bullitt County

    SHEPHERDSVILLE— It can be difficult to picture how tourism affects a county.

    It isn’t as difficult to picture $519, as in the same $519 Bullitt County residents saved in local and state taxes in 2015 thanks to tourism.

    According to a recent study Certec, Inc. of Versailles,  for the year 2015, Bullitt County generated just over $89 million in direct tourist spending and $140 million in total tourist spending.

    Tourism supported 1,901 jobs and produced $31 million in worker income, according to the survey.

  • County looks to see if it owes money now

     SHEPHERDSVILLE — Last March, the “best deal on the table” was for Bullitt Fiscal Court members to pay a deficit of over $638,000 owed by Sheriff David Greenwell.

    The deficit occurred over the first four-year term of Greenwell and it was money owed to the state of Kentucky.

    However, with Greenwell’s retirement at the end of February, Bullitt Fiscal Court members wonder if there might be an even better “deal” that would relieve them of the remaining financial obligations.

  • Dispatch receives sanctions; restricted in some of its functions

      SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Problems with how an agency’s oversight board held meetings dating back three years has come back to haunt Bullitt County Central Dispatch.

    On probation because of lack of proper meetings, Bullitt County dispatchers can no longer provide criminal background checks for local law enforcement agencies, as well as prosecutors in the court system.

    With several infractions in the operation of the dispatch over the past year, sanctions have been imposed by the Kentucky State Police, which oversees the issuance of NCIC licenses.

  • VISIT NEW ORLEANS
  • Leach Family: One of the county’s earliest settlers

     Bullitt County started out with four magisterial districts.  The third District was name Leaches District.  Bullitt County was created out of Jefferson and Nelson County in 1796.  

    The borders and names have changed over several years.  From around 1870 through as late as 1940 the district was known as the Leaches District.   Some people thought the name Leaches was a creepy blood sucking worm.  

    But, the District was named after Enoch Leach.