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Today's News

  • 24th District Baseball: Pitchers' duel goes to Fairdale over BC 2-1

    FAIRDALE - If a person had not seen a single Bullitt Central baseball game all season, watching Monday’s District opener against Fairdale would have been a perfect illustration of a frustrating year.

    The Cougars got good pitching but little offense in a 2-1 setback to the host Bulldogs. The loss closed out the Bullitt Central season with a 5-18 mark.

    “This game was a mirror image of our entire season,” coach Tommy Alvey said following the loss. “The pitching has kept us in the ball games but we just haven’t been able to hit the ball.”

  • Students may have chance to clean county, earn money

    SHEPHERDSVILLE — School groups may have another way to raise funds in the near future.

    And it will be a way to beautify the community.

    Due to a change in some of the allowable reimbursements in the litter abatement program, Bullitt County solid waste coordinator Larry Hatfield said he is looking at other ways to spend the allocated funds.

    The county is slated to receive $72,000 in state funds for 2009 to use on litter abatement projects.

    For the past year, Hatfield said the county would have to return about $28,900 to the state.

  • Lebanon Junction to honor fallen police officers

    LEBANON JUNCTION – Lebanon Junction’s railroad-town history is filled with intricate stories of bar brawls and shoot-outs eerily similar to stories of the old west.

    But Lebanon Junction Police Officer Col. Steve Hamilton wants to remind citizens that before they get caught up in the nostalgia of a bygone era, the colorful stories often came at an expensive price and weren’t necessarily as glamorous as they seemed.

  • Things you learn at local meetings, by watching cable

    Sometimes things are said at local governmental meetings that are so profound that they need a mention -- somewhere in the paper.

    Often, those thoughts get lost in our memory banks or in the pages of our notebooks.

    I’ll spit a couple of recent items that make you want to ponder...

    Recently, Bullitt County was given state approval to do what many private citizens have been doing -- burning storm debris.

    The county has accumulated a massive pile of debris at the Bullitt County Stockyards.

  • Deal will aid entire county in many ways

    Congratulations to the city of Shepherdsville. And congratulations to the people of Bullitt County.

    For the past couple of years, many meetings have been held between officials with the city and Jim Beam Brands.

    The city was looking for a partner to help expand its sewer treatment plant and the international distiller wanted to take its package treatment plant off-line.

    After some ticklish moments when the multi-million project appeared dead, the partnership appears to be back together and moving forward.

  • Problems produced by meth widespread

    SHEPHERDSVILLE – Meth: A word now synonymous throughout the country as a destroyer of lives, homes and entire communities.

    In Bullitt County community members showed support in combating meth issues and problems by learning more about them from local experts.

    About 70 Bullitt Countians attended “Meth 101 - A Community Awareness Program” at the Bullitt County Cooperative Extension Service offices, sponsored by Bullitt County Partners in Prevention.

  • Occupational therapy can aid elderly adapt to growing older

    Today, with advances in medicine and health care, more and more elderly Americans are living longer and wishing to remain in their homes and live as independently as possible.

    Many elderly people would rather have the comfort and ease of staying in their own private, comfortable surroundings instead of going into a skilled nursing facility or a community setting to live.

    This concept is called Aging in Place.

  • Schools cannot slow its CATS drive

    The state legislature felt that the current CATS assessment was not the best way to further education reform in Kentucky.

    The majority decided that there should be a better system of making sure students in the commonwealth are excelling.

    If all the promises are kept, there will not be a problem. Officials have pledged to not take the foot off the accelerator.

    If the Think Link assessments are correct, Bullitt County will see major improvement in test scores this fall. More importantly, student learning has been improved.

  • June 3, 2009: State changes mind; students will go extra day of school

    SHEPHERDSVILLE - Students in Bullitt County will not be getting out of school quite as early as they thought.

    With much disgust, superintendent Keith Davis received approval from the Bullitt County Public School Board to go along with the mandate of the state Department of Education.

    At a special meeting Friday morning, the board opted to amend its current calendar to force students to attend school on Wednesday, June 3. This would extend the revised calendar one day.

  • COYLE'S CORNER