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Columns

  • Holiday events are spectacular

     From all accounts, all four of the holiday events hosted by the cities of Hillview, Mount Washington, Lebanon Junction and Shepherdsville were record-setting events.

    Attendance estimates were all very high and the weather was spectacular the first weekend of December.

    (Hillview’s Winterfest was held indoors on the night in November when the storms came through the county.)

    As I was getting ready for the Shepherdsville festivities to begin, there were some thoughts which came to mind.

  • Barnes House needs your help

     About a week ago, I wrote another editorial about that old yellow house in Mount Washington at risk of destruction (formerly referred to as “the Barnes house”.)

    Unlike the first one I wrote back in September urging residents to care about the house, this one criticized the mayor and city council for, well, not caring.

    There is a group of residents, largely composed of the Mount Washington Historical Society, working to raise the necessary funds to ensure the city keeps a bit of its character in its downtown area. 

  • Apprenticeship programs important in state

     The Commonwealth, along with many other states across this nation, is struggling to find highly-skilled workers to fill scores of job in the manufacturing, health care, agriculture, and trade industries such as electrical, carpentry, plumbing, and telecommunications.

  • Plenty of attractions close to home for holidays

     With Halloween behind us and Thanksgiving around the corner, NOW is the time to start thinking about winter break. Let me suggest WildLights and Jack Hanna’s Home for the Holidays at the Columbus Zoo in Columbus, OH. WildLights kickoffs at the Columbus Zoo on November 17, 2017 and has quickly become a regional favorite featuring millions of LED lights, animated musical shows, the ole jolly guy himself, Santa’s reindeer, and visits with Bumble and Rudolph.

  • Season to give many thanks

     The leaves fell and the weather grew cooler as we transition into this blustery November.

    As Thanksgiving quickly approaches, the Legislature continues to hold Interim Joint Committee meetings throughout the Commonwealth and in Frankfort.

  • Another seasonal classic?

     Bullitt County has again found itself involved in a nationwide controversy that could signal the end of the traditional Thanksgiving holiday.

    Henrietta “Herkey” Turkey was scheduled to appear at the White House Thanksgiving dinner, but fled the area after learning the president refused to offer a traditional presidential pardon.

    “My predecessors may have made it easy on all of these birds, but not me,” Donald Trump said. “No free meals on my watch.”

  • Bullitt County has many things to be thankful for

    As we enter this holiday season, Bullitt County residents should be thankful for many things.

    Are there things which the county suffers a black eye from time to time? Sure.

    But that is common with any place in the United States.

    It is during this Thanksgiving week that we need to look a little deeper.

    We should be thankful that we aren’t waking up every day or going to sleep every night with a new homicide in the news. With the population reaching 80,000, the odds of bad things happening increases.

  • Saying goodbye

     A couple of recent passings of note.

    Harry Cooper moved into the Hillview community from Highland Park and immediately made an impact.

    His first work in the city came with Operation Santa. He served as a helper to the real Santa Claus for a number of years.

    He was never afraid to tell you what he thought. Sometimes that meant going against the city fathers.

    He successfully ran for city council in Hillview. He was also unsuccessful in a bid for mayor.

  • Bullitt County gets high marks for role in JCTC success

     In a world of change in the post-secondary education field, Bullitt County is still a strong community.

    At least, in the eyes of the president of Jefferson Community and Technical College.

    Dr. Ty Handy was the keynote speaker at the recent Bullitt County Chamber of Commerce annual dinner.

    With 12,000 students enrolled in JCTC classes, the biggest growth remains in the dual credit courses.

    High school students take courses that will fulfill their graduation requirements, as well as earn college credits.

  • Proposed pension plan not right

     On behalf of the teachers, administrators and support staff of Bullitt County Public Schools, I urge you to oppose the pension bill put forth by Governor Bevin late week.   

    Almost everyone recognizes that this is a serious issue and appreciates very much that Governor Bevin has determined to take action to rectify a problem that has festered for years.