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Columns

  • Tax decision pretty typical of plight in today’s world

     Should there be unbridled excitement over the recent release of test scores by the state Department of Education?

    Obviously yes…if you are in Bullitt County.

    Should there also be some bridled reservations about what everything means?

    Of course.

    Before throwing any water on the party, we must say that the ship is going in the right direction.

    Some may question or dislike certain individuals. But they cannot question the work that has been done the past few years.

  • Tax decision pretty typical of plight in today’s world

     If you ever wanted to be an elected official, put yourself in the place of members of the Bullitt County Public School Board.

    Personally, it was a simple decision. But I am biased.

    As board members listened and considered a tax increase that would have meant $24 a year on a $100,000 home, I listened to a voice.

    “Am I not worth 46 cents per week?”

    That came from a young lady who I am pretty fond of. It is my daughter.

  • Little of this and lot of that

      Can you believe that summer is over and school is back in session?

    It’s true.

    To get into the Back to School mood, I took a little trip back in history with a visit to The Campus Beautiful.

    For those Eastern Kentucky University grads, that is a familiar motto.

    I had not been back on the campus for over 25 years. A lot had changed but a lot remained the same.

    On a Saturday when few students are on campus, it was a pleasant stroll around the grounds.

  • This is a column that you can take on the road

     It’s not a pretty time to be a motorist in Bullitt County.

    A year from now, things might be a whole lot different.

    No matter where you live in the county, road construction can be seen.

    For the past few months, repairs on Interstate 65 from about Highway 245 south to the Hardin County line have been underway.

    Travelers have been known to complain on the social media on the long, long line on I-65, especially on the weekends.

  • Why don’t many people believe in marriage?

     It’s disturbing to me as a young woman, that no one seems to believe in getting married anymore. People just seem to have kids left and right with numerous partners at their own discretion. When did that become the norm?

    I look forward to the security that comes with having a husband and a house for my children one day. It gives a family stability.

    For a population that is so used to wanting everything right away,  it makes sense they just leave a relationship when it gets hard. They’re not married so they don’t feel an obligation.

  • Sometimes it is better to laugh than to cry

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - In my 30 years at the paper, I’ve learned a couple of things.

    First, always beware of short meeting agendas.

    Second, often it is better to laugh than to cry.

    Both came into play at a recent meeting of Bullitt Fiscal Court.

    Things were flying along. One hour and things were about to wrap up.

    One more topic - not on the agenda - was mentioned. It was a serious topic but it quickly moved into the comedy genre.

  • What will the final six months bring to county?

     At the first of each year, people like to prognosticate on what will happen for the new year.

    Sometimes those predictions are accurate. Sometimes they are not.

    Now that we’ve cut out the first six months of 2014, maybe we can sharpen our scope and see what happens for the final half-dozen months.

    First, we have the election fields narrowed down with a flurry of primary races decided in May.

    It was the first time there were more Republican primary races than Democratic contests in Bullitt County history.

  • BC and NB teams eligible for both LIT events in 2015

     SHEPHERDSVILLE – We are now firmly in the ‘dead period.’

         Fortunately, as of today, there is no word of any vampires, ghosts or zombies walking through any of our athletic facilities.

         The ‘dead period’ is the creation of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association. It is a two-week period from June 25 to July 9 in which high school coaches and athletic facilities and equipment cannot be in use.

  • Education can come in many ways, shapes

     SHEPHERDSVILLE - How do you grade a student’s education?

    Is it by the grades on the report card?

    Could it be by the scores on the ACT or other tests?

    Could it be by the manners a child shows in every day life?

    Could it be by the maturity gained and the common sense acquired to survive in life?

    Could it be by the number of friends a person has or the friends maybe on Facebook?

    Could it be that you really can’t grade a student until years after he or she has graduated from the school system?

  • Cornell has had amazing 101 years of life

     I had the pleasure of sitting with Hilden Cornell recently. Some of you who have been around Bullitt County for a long time might remember her. She taught for almost 30 years at Pleasant Grove Elementary, Waterford Elementary, Saint Aloysius School and ended at Brooks Elementary.

    On May 9 she turned 101 years old.

    I was truly inspired by this woman’s example. Even after having lost the majority of her eyesight about 10 years now she still goes on living her life. And is so optimistic.