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Columns

  • Miss Brady goes to Frankfort

    Madison Brady was a fourth grade student at St Joseph Elementary in Bardstown.  We first met when I was in Betty Carol Riley's classroom last fall talking about America's system of government – Representative Democracy.  Madison listened closely, especially when I said that any of them could come up and be a Page in the Capitol during a legislative session. 

  • Redistricting comes down to the wire

    Following a national census, which takes place every ten years in America, your General Assembly must redraw the lines that define legislative, senatorial, and U.S. Congressional districts.  The current legislative session has that as a primary duty.   Lines are drawn based on revised population data, the goal being to end up with 100 state house districts, 38 state senate districts, and 6 U.S. congressional districts of roughly equivalent populations.

  • Million Hearts initiative to prevent strokes, attacks

    February is Heart Month, and many people will be thinking about what to get their sweetheart for Valentine's Day.

    Although the holiday is usually celebrated with gifts of candy or flowers, good health is the one thing that everyone appreciates year-round.

    The Medical Reserve Corps, (MRC) is teaming up with numerous other government and private sector organizations to support the new Million Hearts(tm) initiative (http://millionhearts.hhs.gov), which aims to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes over the next five years.

  • Watch carbon monoxide levels

    FRANKFORT– As outdoor winter temperatures drop and the risk for carbon monoxide poisoning increases, Kentuckians are urged to be aware of the dangers of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning due to improper use of heating or cooking devices.

  • A legislative perspective on the Kentucky General Assembly with Rep. Linda Belcher

    When the General Assembly began the legislative session last month, there was already broad agreement on what the three biggest issues would be: Writing state government’s budget; realigning legislative and Kentucky Supreme Court districts; and limiting if not stopping prescription drug abuse.

    Last week, the latter two took center stage.

  • Rep. Jeff Greer on redistricting

  • UPDATE: Local Groundhog Day forecast in jeopardy

     NICHOLS - The winter of 2012 has been mild in comparison with recent winters. Bullitt County Public Schools have not yet experienced a snow day.

    School officials and local government agencies plan to keep it that way after a generous posted reward led to the capture of unofficial Bullitt County groundhog Nichols Nick.

    A long-time prognosticator of the early spring forecast, Nick faced increased ridicule in recent years, taking blame for the long, harsh winters.

  • Bills flow through committee and to the Senate floor as General Assembly moves forward

    FRANKFORT – We are now a quarter way through session.  Bills are flowing through the committee process and arriving on the Senate floor for consideration before the entire chamber.

    Three bills won passage this week and will now head to the House of Representatives. Senate Bill 55 allows for interstate mutual aid agreements among first-responders and other emergency response personnel. That is to say, that if an emergency occurs near local or state borders, emergency personnel can respond regardless of their home base.

  • A legislative perspective on the Kentucky General Assembly with Rep. Linda Belcher

    FRANKFORT – Shortly after Governor Beshear first took office, he said he knew that state government’s cupboard would be bare, but he didn’t expect to find it gone.

  • Legislative Update from Representative Jeff Greer

    Hearing Governor Beshear’s budget address reminded legislators of the many challenges that lay ahead if we are to meet our obligations and still find ways to move Kentucky forward.

    Even though our economy is slowly improving the reality is that we must bridge a $742 million shortfall for the next two years.  As in any budget year, the Kentucky General Assembly must now study the governor’s plan and make changes and edits.  This is a long process that will take weeks of analysis, discussion, committee meetings, and compromise.