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Today's Opinions

  • Good compromise

     Once you get into the legal arena, seldom are things completed quickly. There are rules that must be followed and due process to both parties that must be guaranteed.

    We are pleased that the discourse over the selection of the mayor in Shepherdsville has moved from whether there can be a meeting due to a lack of a quorum to being able to handle the business at hand.

    We commend attorney Mark Edison for coming up with a solution to allow his clients -- councilmembers Larry Hatfield and Bernie Brown -- to attend meetings and make sure there is a quorum.

  • BBB Warns: Beware of scams surrounding the death of Prince

     BBB is warning Prince fans to beware of scams that could pop up, surrounding his death. Yesterday, news broke that Prince Rogers Nelson was found dead in his home in Minneapolis at the age of 57.

    Scammers use celebrity deaths to con fans in a variety of ways. Whatever the scam may be, fans will end up with viruses or malware on their computers, or giving out personal information.

  • US Marshals warn of “arrest warrant phone scam”

     The U.S. Marshals Service has received several phone calls from residents who have received phone calls from a person stating they are a U.S. Marshal and threating arrest if a “fine” is not paid.

    If you have received a phone call from a person saying they are a federal law enforcement officer, sheriff or an attorney for the government and they have an arrest warrant for you if a fine is not paid. It’s a scam.

  • Budget compromise is reached

     FRANKFORT -- A new day is dawning in Kentucky.

    For the first time in many years, the winds of financial responsibility have begun to blow briskly through the marble halls of Frankfort. These welcome breezes are ushering in the promise of a fresh start for the Commonwealth. 

  • Energy savings go back into classrooms

     Over the past ten years, despite the economic downturn, Bullitt County Public Schools created nearly $4 million in new education funds –– without raising taxes.   

    In the 2005-06 school year, BCPS decided to make aggressive improvements in our energy use. LED lighting, the building automation system, and heat-absorbing window films not only improve student’s alertness and ability to learn but also have a huge impact on our budget’s bottom line. 

    In fact, we cut our energy cost per square foot nearly in HALF.

  • City’s effort to regulate signs encouraging, challenging

     With this summer’s Homearama coming to town, Mount Washington officials are looking to tidy up its house.

    And they have also asked the county officials to join in the spruce up efforts.

    While miracles cannot be worked over the next two months, the discussions by Mount Washington city officials are encouraging.

    They are looking to get a handle on the signage which can been seen throughout the community.

    This is a very noble effort. It will be interesting to see the outcome.

  • Lot of great things happening in school system

     Rather than focus on a particular issue this month, I will very briefly hit the high points of a few things that may be of interest to the Bullitt County community about its school system:

    *The Run for the Spirits Gala, sponsored by the independent Bullitt County Foundation for Excellence in Public Education, is coming up on Friday, April 22.

    This important event is not only a lot of fun, the money raised is awarded by the group to teachers and programs to provide items for their classrooms that may not otherwise be affordable. 

  • John Brown Cundiff was a Confederate Soldier

     John Brown Cundiff; Jr. was born around 1830 in Kentucky.  His parents were John Brown; Sr. and Elizabeth Younger. John‘s father John Brown Sr. was born in Virginia in 1799. 

    His mother Elizabeth Younger was born 1799 in Virginia.  John Cundiff Sr. married Elizabeth Younger in 1820, in Bullitt County, Kentucky.  John Brown Jr. had several brothers and sisters.  

    John’s father died in 1855 at the age of 56 years old.  He died in Bullitt County, Kentucky.