Today's Opinions

  • Voices can make change in community

     Is there a need for more rehabilitation work done in the area of drug abuse?

    There is no question that the answer is yes.

    But, does anyone want such a facility in their back yard?

    The answer to that is also simple -- no.

    What local businessman Kenny Hester quickly learned was that rumors spread quickly.

    When he heard that a proposed 10,000 square foot building he would build and lease could house a methadone clinic, Hester went on the offensive.

  • Thanks for efforts to make Chamber, county better place

     It is with much sadness that we bid farewell to Jenny Estepp, executive director of the Bullitt County Chamber of Commerce.

    Over the past two-plus years as director, Estepp has brought a certain energy to the efforts.

    Much work has been done to get more people involved in the various Chamber activities.

    More networking opportunities have been developed to get some of the non-traditional Chamber regulars more involved.

    It is a younger, more vibrant Chamber than in years past.


      SHEPHERDSVILLE -- It was an interesting discussion that probably needs to be held more regularly.

    Steve and Barbara Plenge appeared at a recent meeting of the Shepherdsville-Bullitt County Tourist and Convention Commission.

    They had questions about the makeup and operation about the organization.

    For those regularly attending meetings or following the happenings of the organization, it might not be too complicated.

    But, then again, maybe it is.

  • Right choice made on tax rate in county

     There are easy decisions and there are good decisions.

    While we understand the desire to lower tax rates, three members of Bullitt Fiscal Court were exactly right in at least keeping the real estate property tax the same for 2015.

    Keeping the current rate will at least generate a little more revenue for the county. Dropping down to the compensating rate would have been a grand gesture but not a sound one.

  • Plenty of good things happening in 49th District

      I made an appointment to speak with both KIPDA and District 5 Transportation to ask questions and get updates. 

    Bullitt County has received very few projects/funds from KIPDA during the last 7-8 years. 

    During the meeting we had a very frank discussion about the REASONS why. KIPDA offered to hold a workshop to help Bullitt County Government officials understand how to make request, when to make requests and the types of funding available. 

  • Getting good jobs and preparing for them

     I recently ran across a report from Georgetown University regarding “Good Jobs” created since the end of the 2008-10 recession.  

    The study’s authors define good jobs as those paying more than $53,000 annually for a full-time, full-year worker, so we are talking about very, very good jobs for a young person starting their career in Kentucky.

    In addition, the majority of these good jobs are full time, offer health insurance and provide employer sponsored retirement plans - adding more than 30 percent on top of employee base salary.

  • State treasurer warns of phony IRS tax scam

     Frankfort – Kentucky Treasurer Todd Hollenbach says scam artists are at work again calling Kentuckians and identifying themselves as IRS representatives telling folks they owe money to the IRS and threatening legal action if they don’t pay.

    "The IRS does not initially contact taxpayers by phone so if you receive a call or get a voice message from someone claiming to be a representative from the IRS threatening to take legal action against you, it’s a good bet it’s a scam,” Hollenbach said.

  • Jessica has already made writer proud

     It’s that time of year when school begins, not only for the kids but also for the college-bound students.

    Many of these students are anxious and excited about a new beginning, moving away from home to live on a college campus.

    As a member of The Pioneer News staff, I’ve known many local students who have performed well in high school and headed to that next level. Some have returned to become prominent local citizens.