Today's Opinions

  • Don’t be ‘scared’ to be organ donor

     As Halloween approaches, people think of scary things like witches, spiders, and haunted houses, but what is actually scary is the fact that each day 22 children, men & women in America die needlessly. 

    As superhero capes are fitted, what Kentuckians don’t realize that everyone can be a superhero all year long, costume not necessary.  Simply by saying “yes” at your Circuit Clerk’s office and becoming a registered organ donor.

  • Newspapers are still important if you want to be informed person

     One might believe that as we observe National Newspaper Week, there might be a bit of despair.

    Yes, the newspaper business has changed. But our need to know might be greater than ever.

    In this crazy, hectic world, there is more happening than ever.

    There's more internal disagreements. There's more frustration with our governmental agencies.

    There is never a shortage of news. And that’s just the stuff you might see on the nightly news.

    Bullitt County has so much more going on and all of it is not bad.

  • Grades add up for school district work

     Just for a few moments, the naysayers who do not believe in the progress being made by the Bullitt County Public School System -- go to the corner and be quiet.

    By this time, one would think that those who do not believe in the work being done by the school system would be convinced.

    We know they are not. And we would never expect 100 percent of the people to be standing firm in the corner of the school system -- or any other entity.

    Just for argument’s sake, the school system should earn some credit.

  • Power of press is reporting the news consumers need

     WASHINGTON -- The power of the press rests in the ability of journalists to hold government accountable, to mobilize public opinion on matters that are important to individuals, communities or the nation, and to provide necessary information of value.

    Notice in those words not a mention of celebrity content, mobile devices nor‚ 'aspirational‚' reportage that feels good without doing any good.

  • BBB Warns: Beware of scams after flooding

     The Better Business Bureau is warning those who want to help flood victims in South Carolina and neighboring states to beware of scammers and fake charities. After a natural disaster, it’s common for scam artists to impersonate charities to get money or private information from those who want to help.

    Here are some tips from BBB:

    ·       Donate to well-known charities. Beware of charities that spring up overnight. Check out a charity at bbb.org/charity.

  • Cooler temps heat up fall bass fishing

     FRANKFORT – The orange tint in the tops of mature trees portend what is coming our way. Cool nights with crisp, gorgeous days signal not only some of the best days of the year in Kentucky, but also the beginning of the fall reservoir fishing season for largemouth bass.

    September is typically the driest month of the year and the water in many lakes becomes air-clear. The clear water combined with the lingering summer thermal stratification of the lake makes predator fish lethargic and skittish. This leads to tough fishing.

  • Fall fire season now in place in Kentucky

    FRANKFORT -- The Kentucky Division of Forestry (KDF) is using noses and paws to catch arsonists as the fall wildfire season, which runs from Oct. 1 through Dec. 15, gets underway. 

    During the wildfire hazard season outdoor burning is prohibited from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. in or within 150 feet of any woodland or brushland.

    Bloodhounds trained to investigate arson cases will be available for the second year. Through a partnership with the Bell County Forestry Camp, multiple bloodhounds and handlers are now available to assist KDF with wildfire arson investigation.

  • Indian attack on Johnson’s children in Bullitt

    The earlier Johnson family came into Kentucky in the late 1780’s from Maryland.  Bullitt County did not become a County until 1796.

    The Ephraim Johnson family settled in the area known as the small stream called Cane Run, three miles north of what is now known as Lebanon Junction, Kentucky.

    There was a station located down on the lower creek at the place known as Holsclaw.