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Today's Opinions

  • Legislature makes historic strides in ‘17

      It was an honor to serve you and our district in Frankfort this session. Called the “most productive and historic session” in history, I, along with my colleagues in the Senate, were proud to stand with Kentuckians as we passed historic legislation alongside our new House Majority. 

    In November of 2016, citizens from across the Commonwealth gave us a mandate through the electoral process to fundamentally change our state. 

  • Issues dogged county long enough...time to solve them

     We are normally not all that excited when the way to solve a problem is to form a committee or a task force.

    However, Bullitt County Judge Melanie Roberts may have reached the only possible solution to the barks and howls over the operation of the animal shelter when she recommended a committee.

    Of course, we’ve not seen a committee where the entire fiscal court is part of the group. But, we’ll give it a shot.

    Currently, there is no possbile chance that the current animal control director and the county judge will agree on anything.

  • Session busy, productive

      Long nights, intense debate, and media attention from across the globe wrapped up what started as a quiet final week of the 2017 Session of the Kentucky General Assembly. 

    Minutes before the Senate gaveled out for good, Gov. Matt Bevin called this session the most productive in history. 

    It was truly an honor to work alongside the governor with the new House Majority to pass many great initiatives for our commonwealth. 

    Critics and supporters alike have noted the session was among the busiest our state has ever seen. 

  • House gets lot done in short time

     The most productive and significant legislative session in modern history has officially come to an end. 

    Although it was a short, 30-day session, the General Assembly has accomplished more in 2017 than we have in most 60-day sessions. 

    When Republicans took the majority in the House of Representatives last November, Speaker Hoover came right in and declared that the House would once again be a functioning institution. 

  • Stop child abuse forever

       In observance of Child Abuse Month in April, a nine-year-old student at Crossroads Elementary wrote the following essay:

  • Small issues may become big issues on facility’s use

     It’s kind of funny how quickly one discussion can lead to another and how a non-issue becomes a major issue.

    Shepherdsville mayor Curtis Hockenbury and the council started a recent conversation about whether an agency could be given access to the community center several hours a day.

    Before you could bat an eye, the public works department would take over the use of the Shepherdsville Community Center and several groups would be left looking for other options.

    The decision took a matter of minutes.

  • Schools only stability for 300 homeless kids

     Instead of starting your morning with breakfast, you start by packing up your things. 

    Your mom says our stay at the hotel is over and we have to find a new place to go.

    You’re late to school again because mom’s car wouldn’t start this morning and you had to find a ride there. 

    She kisses you goodbye telling you everything will be okay, but you’re not so sure.

    Your stomach rumbles, but you’re too late for breakfast. 

  • Some misconceptions about charter schools

     As many of you know, in this past legislative session, we have taken significant action to reform education in Kentucky.

    Regardless of all of the hyperbole, our reforms will go a long way in providing better educational opportunities for some of the students in our state who so desperately need it.

    The Governor recently signed House Bill 520 into law, making Kentucky the 44th state to allow for the establishment of charter schools.