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Features

  •  The 8th grade class from Little Flock Flock Christian Academy visited Washington DC in March.

    Through their mission work, they served at the Capital Area Food Bank and at Central Union Mission.

    They also visited Arlington Cemetery, National Archives, Smithsonian Zoo and Museums, Memorials and Monuments, International Spy Museum, NBA game, Mt. Vernon, Ford’s Theater, The Pentagon, The White House, The Capitol, Medieval Times, and Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - A new fundraising campaign shows signs that Bullitt Central High School is stepping in the right direction.

    The school kicked off a shoe collection drive through Funds2Orgs in hopes of raising funding for a new digital school sign.

    Organizer Terry Stamps, a Bullitt Central clerical assistant, said the goal was to collect 300 bags worth of new and gently-used shoes, with 25 pair to a bag.

    The shoes will be collected by Funds2Orgs, who will distribute them to places in Africa and Central America.

  • If you are a music lover, then Tennessee may be “playing your song” the first weekend in May.

  • FRANKFORT--Gene Weis is available to assist Bullitt County schools, students, parents and groups that want help with college planning.

    He is available year-round to provide free higher education and financial aid assistance. Weis can lead students in career exploration activities, assist with the admissions application process, help students explore scholarship opportunities and other funding options, guide families through submission of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and increase motivation for at-risk students.

  •  LOUISVILLE – On April 19 in 1792, Kentucky’s first Constitution was adopted, as an independent government for the nation’s fifteenth state was about to be launched on the western frontier.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - A devastating tornado demolished the small town of Fairdale, Illinois, earlier this month.

    A local church has decided to do its part in assisting Fairdale residents with a truck full of donated and much-needed supplies.

    Family Day Ministries will be collecting items through Thursday, April 23, to assist the tornado victims.

    Pastor Mike Miller has been involved with similar collections in the past. From his experiences he has learned the types of items people in Fairdale may need most.

  •   MOUNT WASHINGTON -- Bullitt County has recognized a need and is taking action.

    Jacey Smothers, family resource center coordinator at Mount Washington and Roby Elementarys, said both of her schools have a lot of grandparents that are raising their grandchildren now.

    She said she thought Open Arms, a support group for grandparents and other relative caregivers, would be beneficial to her school communities and others.

  •  HEBRON ESTATES - Sometimes high school students seem like zombies when they get up in the morning for school.

    North Bullitt Drama students appeared that way on purpose for a special zombie trilogy presentation of one-act plays known as the “Zombie Creature Triple Feature.”

    The plays included “10 Ways to Survive the Zombie Apocalypse” by Don Zolidis, “Everything I Need to Know I Learned from Being a Zombie” by Jason Pizzarello, and “The Brainfest Club” by Drama Club director Adam Elliott.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON -- A local project has captured some national attention. The Youth Chamber of Preservationists was recently commended by the U.S. States Environmental Protection Agency for their project “Put a LID on it.”

    Four juniors at Bullitt East High School: Haley Steinmetz; Eliza Love; Gavin Blain and Isaac Shelton, utilized the EPA national stormwater calculator to survey and create a low impact design model for the site of the new Mount Washington Public Library.

  • MOUNT WASHINGTON--Clean closet for clean water. Have some new or gently used shoes that you don’t know what to do with after spring cleaning? Donate them to the Bullitt East BETA Club efforts.

    From Monday, April 13, to Thursday, April 30, the club will be collecting shoes of all varieties for the WaterStep program.

    The organization sells the shoes to exporter and then uses the funds to provide safe drinking water to third-world countries such as Uganda, Kenya and Costa Rica.

  •  PIONEER VILLAGE - The 5th graders at Maryville Elementary wax poetic as historical figures in their annual wax museum.

    Teachers Ashley Gallusser and Kimberly Tabler help present the museum as a school project.

    According to Tabler, students selected and researched an historical character who made an important impact on American history.

    Students created costumes and props for their presentation. They prepared a monologue that they read to the museum guests, which included parents and other students.

  •  MOUNT WASHNGTON -- Are you veteran?

    Live in Mount Washington?

    Then the Mount Washington Family Spring festival coordinators are looking for you.

    Bill Willoughby, a coordinator of the festival, said the theme this year is “Our Heroes.”

    He said it was a natural choice, for the Mount Washington Lion and Lioness clubs, since it is their motto.

    The group is seeking the oldest veteran in Mount Washington to serve as this year’s grand marshal in the parade on Saturday, May 9.

  •        MOUNT WASHINGTON -- Hard work and dedication has paid off for Mount Washington Community Ministries. 

    The 31-year-old organization was recently named the Kentucky Pantry of the Year by Dare to Care at the 5th Annual Presentation of the Dare to Care Food Bank 2015 Bobby Ellis Awards.

    “I think this is an indication that the community appreciates the volunteers and their time and the organizations who contribute funds,” said Ralph Clark, co-director of the Mount Washington Community Ministries.

  •   Diabetes is a complicated disease process. Diabetes is a chronic disease that can cause some serious complications for a person if not controlled. Control is the ultimate goal with Diabetes. The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) identifies seven Self-Care Behaviors on which one should focus to obtain that goal.

  •   The cost of food in America remains affordable.  According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service, American consumers spend, on average, just over 10 percent of their disposable income for food.

    According to Mark Haney, Kentucky Farm Bureau President, that means the average household will have earned enough disposable income—that portion of your income available for spending or saving—to pay for its annual food supply in about seven weeks.

  •   CLERMONT - When it comes to reading, Bernheim Middle School students can…and box, and bag, too.

    BMS students collected over 1,300 food items for the Dare to Care program as part of a school-wide event in conjunction with the annual Book Fair.

    Library/Media Specialist Karla Elliott decided on this year's Book Fair theme, Reading Oasis, as a way to get students involved in challenging students to care about helping others.

  • Clermont, KY – Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest wants the public to help decide the name of a Golden Eagle it recently fitted with a GPS satellite transmitter.  The adult male spent time in the knobs of Bernheim and the surrounding region this winter and the transmitter now indicates he is heading back to his nesting grounds, which could be as far as northern Canada.  Just this past weekend, the eagle was flying south of Chicago after traveling north through Indiana.

  • Employing a combination of basic materials and advanced technology, Mt. Washington and Old Mill Elementary School fourth and fifth grade students created a prosthetic device for a student whose left arm ends at the elbow joint.

                (Parents of the student requested the youth recipient and school not be identified).

  •  ORLANDO -- One, two, three time’s a charm. After having high marks the last three years, Eastside Middle School small cheerleader squad finally won the world champion title at the United Cheerleading Association National High School Cheerleading Championship in Florida.

    “It was really exciting, especially for the kids because they practiced so hard,” said head cheerleading coach Carrie DeBold.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON -- Though the war may be over, for some the battle has just begun. After serving our country, many military service members have a hard time transitioning back to civilian life. Especially if they were in combat.

    Heather French Henry, commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs, shared how she was personally affected by this battle with members of the Mount Washington AARP recently.

    The 2000 Miss America’s father served in the Marines during Vietnam where he became disabled.