•   SHEPHERDSVILLE - Local residents can do their part to help others in two different but equally important ways.

    North Bullitt Christian Church is hosting a Red Cross Blood Drive and a Be The Match Bone Marrow Donor Drive on Sunday, October 4, from 12:30 to 5 p.m.

    No appointment is necessary for the bone marrow drive. Donors must be between the ages of 18 and 44. The donor will complete a brief medical history and conduct a cheek swab, which will be processed and added to the donor registry.

  •  LEBANON JUNCTION  - They fly high in the sky and spread their wings, and for younger girls they sometimes serve as guardians angels.

    They are female pilots, members of the Kentucky Bluegrass Chapter of the Ninety-Nines, Inc., an international women’s pilot organization.

    The local members will soon host flights as part of the Family Weekend at the Bardstown Airport. Meanwhile, the local members hope to promote flying as a hobby or profession for area girls.

  •  Eastside Middle School has been selected as one of the Honorable Mentions regarding teaching conditions, school safety, and student achievement according to results of the 2015 Kentucky TELL Survey.

    “I feel truly blessed to be a part of the Eastside community,” principal Troy Wood said. “This honor is a genuine reflection of the students, parents, teachers and staff at Eastside. Our success is a collaborative effort, and we couldn’t be successful otherwise.”

  •  LOUISVILLE -- Students and teachers looking for a creative classroom project this fall will find the perfect blend fun and educational materials in the annual Conservation Writing and Art Contests, sponsored by Kentucky Farm Bureau and the Kentucky Association of Conservation Districts. 

    This contest encourages Kentucky’s finest young writers and artists to create and submit short essays and artistic entries that promote best practices for wildlife conservation efforts across the state.

  •  FRANKFORT -- Seventeen students from Bullitt County have been named Sen. Jeff Green Scholars by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA). To earn this honor, a student must have a 4.0 grade point average each year of high school and at least a 28 composite on the ACT.

    These students have also earned $2,500 a year in Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES) awards. If they keep their grades up in college, they will have $10,000 to use toward a four-year degree.

  •  Six individuals were remembered during a recent rally to stop drug overdoses.

    Those highlighted were recent victims to the illness that fuels drug overdoses, especially heroin.

    The Walking for Wellness Stop Heroin Bullitt County organization sponsored the event. It hosts walks and other activities throughout the community to raise awareness.

  •   BARDSTOWN -- In a world of dying farms and dying families, one Bardstown couple hopes to bring the closeness back with their first full-length feature film “The Old Winter.”

    “The Old Winter” is a historically based drama that sheds a light on the disappearance of small farms by following Asa Bodine as he returns to his inherited Kentucky farmland 40 years after he left during the Depression.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - Thanks to a local organization’s efforts in promoting heathy lifestyle choices, Bullitt Countians can continue to strive for better health.

    For five years the Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency (KIPDA) has funded a rural diabetes coalition in Bullitt, Henry and Shelby Counties with a $2.5 million grant provided by the Center for Disease Control (CDC).

    Grant funding provided educational tools, civic events and moral support to county residents hoping to handle, or even avoid, diabetes.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON -- The city of Mount Washington is about to get a whole lot healthier and the White House has taken notice!

    Councilmember Alice Harris has been invited to the White House in September after applying for the “Let’s Move! Cities, Towns and Counties” (LMCTC) program.

    The LMCTC initiative grew out of the Let’s Move! program launched by First Lady Michelle Obama in an effort to help encourage healthy and active lifestyles for children across America so that those children can grow up healthier and pursue their dreams.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON -- Crossroads Elementary is working to prepare girls with added confidence and a positive self-image before they head to middle school with the Girls on the Run program.

    The program focuses on encouraging girls in grades 3-5 to find their inner strength by providing them with the tools they need to become strong, confident, healthy young women who make good choices, according to counselor Lauren Manion.

    This is the second year Crossroads has hosted it.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE -- When you think of having a “healthy” community, what comes to mind?

    Is it safety? Or maybe it could be quality of life?

    Does physical and mental well-being describe your definition of health?

    Maybe access, happiness or spiritual health fits that definition?

    Whatever your definition, it will play an important role in the five-year community assessment currently underway through the Bullitt County Health Department.

  •  Summer camps are usually designed with the students’ futures in mind, but one of them offered a fun glimpse into the past.

    A Kentucky History camp was sponsored by the Bullitt County Public Schools Family Resource Centers at Cedar Grove, Lebanon Junction, Mount Washington and Roby Elementary.

    Students participated in field trips during the week-long camp, including the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park, My Old Kentucky Home and the Stephen Foster Story, Locust Grove and the Louisville Water Tower.

  •  Students at Pleasant Grove Elementary ushered in the new year with a parade led by the Mount Washington Fire Department.

    The fourth graders of Pleasant Grove Elementary made sure onlookers knew they were proud of their grade with their banner, their noisemakers, and their “Fourth Grade Rocks!” chant.

    See more photos from Stephanie Jessie in the multimedia section of www.pioneernews.net.

  •  FRANKFORT, - Citizen Foster Care Review Boards in 35 counties are seeking volunteers to make a difference in the lives of local children in foster care. 

    The boards are in need of volunteers to review cases of children placed in foster care because of dependency, neglect or abuse to ensure they are placed in safe, permanent homes as quickly as possible.

  •  MOREHEAD - The initial class of Craft Academy for Excellence in Science and Mathematics arrived Sunday, Aug. 9, on the campus of Morehead State University.

    The Craft Academy for Excellence in Science and Mathematics was designed to meet the unique educational needs of academically gifted and talented high school juniors and seniors in the Commonwealth. 

    A college-level curriculum will allow students to finish high school while also completing up to two years of university coursework.

  •  The Bullitt County Sheriff’s Office will conduct traffic safety checkpoints through Sept. 7.

    During the checkpoints in Bullitt County, officers will be enforcing laws related to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, licensing of motor vehicles and operators, registration and insurance violations, seat belt and child restraint violations and motor vehicle equipment violations.

  •   SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Days before the Kentucky State Fair opens to the public, Shepherdsville residents Nina Bain and Dennis Shaffner were busy at work to display the antique and art competitive exhibits. 

    “Out of all the years, this is the happiest I’ve ever been,” Bain said. “I’m going to retire on a really high note.”

    Bain is the superintendent for the antique exhibit.

  •  The Bullitt County Health Department celebrates National Immunization Month by reminding both adults and children — You “Otter” Immunize! 

    Vaccines are an important step in protecting adults against several serious and sometimes deadly diseases.

    The need for vaccination does not end in childhood. Vaccines are recommended throughout our lives based on age, lifestyle, occupation, locations of travel, medical conditions, and vaccines received in the past. 

  •  Kindergarten students at Roby Elementary got a head start on the school year.

    They gathered at the school before the opening day to meet with teachers, learn their way around the school and participate in various activities.

  •  LOUISVILLE - Kentucky has some of the highest cancer rates in the country. In order to improve those statistics, KentuckyOne Health and the Kentucky Cancer Program and affiliates have teamed up to provide screening opportunities for five different cancers at the Kentucky State Fair, August 20-30, 2015.