• MOUNT WASHINGTON--Clean closet for clean water. Have some new or gently used shoes that you don’t know what to do with after spring cleaning? Donate them to the Bullitt East BETA Club efforts.

    From Monday, April 13, to Thursday, April 30, the club will be collecting shoes of all varieties for the WaterStep program.

    The organization sells the shoes to exporter and then uses the funds to provide safe drinking water to third-world countries such as Uganda, Kenya and Costa Rica.

  •  PIONEER VILLAGE - The 5th graders at Maryville Elementary wax poetic as historical figures in their annual wax museum.

    Teachers Ashley Gallusser and Kimberly Tabler help present the museum as a school project.

    According to Tabler, students selected and researched an historical character who made an important impact on American history.

    Students created costumes and props for their presentation. They prepared a monologue that they read to the museum guests, which included parents and other students.

  •  MOUNT WASHNGTON -- Are you veteran?

    Live in Mount Washington?

    Then the Mount Washington Family Spring festival coordinators are looking for you.

    Bill Willoughby, a coordinator of the festival, said the theme this year is “Our Heroes.”

    He said it was a natural choice, for the Mount Washington Lion and Lioness clubs, since it is their motto.

    The group is seeking the oldest veteran in Mount Washington to serve as this year’s grand marshal in the parade on Saturday, May 9.

  •        MOUNT WASHINGTON -- Hard work and dedication has paid off for Mount Washington Community Ministries. 

    The 31-year-old organization was recently named the Kentucky Pantry of the Year by Dare to Care at the 5th Annual Presentation of the Dare to Care Food Bank 2015 Bobby Ellis Awards.

    “I think this is an indication that the community appreciates the volunteers and their time and the organizations who contribute funds,” said Ralph Clark, co-director of the Mount Washington Community Ministries.

  •   Diabetes is a complicated disease process. Diabetes is a chronic disease that can cause some serious complications for a person if not controlled. Control is the ultimate goal with Diabetes. The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) identifies seven Self-Care Behaviors on which one should focus to obtain that goal.

  •   The cost of food in America remains affordable.  According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service, American consumers spend, on average, just over 10 percent of their disposable income for food.

    According to Mark Haney, Kentucky Farm Bureau President, that means the average household will have earned enough disposable income—that portion of your income available for spending or saving—to pay for its annual food supply in about seven weeks.

  •   CLERMONT - When it comes to reading, Bernheim Middle School students can…and box, and bag, too.

    BMS students collected over 1,300 food items for the Dare to Care program as part of a school-wide event in conjunction with the annual Book Fair.

    Library/Media Specialist Karla Elliott decided on this year's Book Fair theme, Reading Oasis, as a way to get students involved in challenging students to care about helping others.

  • Clermont, KY – Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest wants the public to help decide the name of a Golden Eagle it recently fitted with a GPS satellite transmitter.  The adult male spent time in the knobs of Bernheim and the surrounding region this winter and the transmitter now indicates he is heading back to his nesting grounds, which could be as far as northern Canada.  Just this past weekend, the eagle was flying south of Chicago after traveling north through Indiana.

  • Employing a combination of basic materials and advanced technology, Mt. Washington and Old Mill Elementary School fourth and fifth grade students created a prosthetic device for a student whose left arm ends at the elbow joint.

                (Parents of the student requested the youth recipient and school not be identified).

  •  ORLANDO -- One, two, three time’s a charm. After having high marks the last three years, Eastside Middle School small cheerleader squad finally won the world champion title at the United Cheerleading Association National High School Cheerleading Championship in Florida.

    “It was really exciting, especially for the kids because they practiced so hard,” said head cheerleading coach Carrie DeBold.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON -- Though the war may be over, for some the battle has just begun. After serving our country, many military service members have a hard time transitioning back to civilian life. Especially if they were in combat.

    Heather French Henry, commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs, shared how she was personally affected by this battle with members of the Mount Washington AARP recently.

    The 2000 Miss America’s father served in the Marines during Vietnam where he became disabled.

  •   HEBRON ESTATES -- It was difficult to decide who might have been smiling the most.

    It could have been University of Louisville president James Ramsey and his staff.

    Or it could have been members of the Bullitt County Public School System.

    Ramsey made a recent visit to several of the programs now underway in Bullitt County.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON - There are two plans of attack in the battle against homelessness.

    The short-term approach involves finding immediate food, clothing and shelter for those in need.

    The long-term involves a process in which the person gets back on their feet in an attempt to re-establish a normal, self-sustaining life.

    The Shepherd's Shelter, Inc., is a non-profit, faith-based organization first created in 2001 by local citizens, offering "a continuum of care" throughout the entire homeless process.

  •  FRANKFORT -- The popular Close the Deal program has been transferred from the Lieutenant Governor’s Office to the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA).

    Close the Deal helps high school seniors make the transition to college or careers. It recruits community and business leaders to foster a college-going culture at their local schools.

    Lt. Gov. Crit Luallen said she will continue to support the program because she believes that it is important to the Commonwealth.

  •  A Kentucky Society for Technology in Education (KySTE) grant of nearly $20,000 has been awarded to Crossroads Elementary School for students to design, create and host a robotics film festival.

    KySTE offered $100,000 to any school district in an outreach offering for the 2014-2015 school year. Only six schools earned grants, including Crossroads.

    Music teacher Amy Cuenca and Science teacher Jaymee Clemens will use the funds to purchase Lego Mindstorm robotics kits along with 30 iPads, 30 iPad covers for protection of the devices and 30 iMovie apps.

  •  BOWLING GREEN -- Thirty-two students from Western Kentucky University and the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky will present their research at the 2015 Posters-at-the-Capitol event Feb. 19 in Frankfort.

    Richard Arnold, a senior from Cleaton, and Caitlyn Clark, a senior from Roundhill, will present Building Envelope Integrity Assessments. Faculty mentor: Robert Choate

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - One thing for certain, no other team had more to cheer about.

    The Bullitt Central Cheerleading Team placed seventh overall out of 600 teams in the Large Co-Ed Division of the 2015 National High School Cheerleading Championships.

    Bullitt Central’s visits to Orlando, Fla., for the annual competition have become commonplace; however, this year’s trip was completely different, involving a bus accident in Atlanta, Ga., en route to the Sunshine State.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE -- Work continues on restoring the Bowman Valley Schoolhouse.

    The last African-American schoolhouse in the county was recently moved to its new home next to the Bullitt County Board of Education.

    According to project volunteer Gwinn Hahn, several activities are currently underway.

    With the assistance of students from Bellarmine University, an oral history is being collected from former students of the school.

  •  It was time Monday to say the final goodbyes to Les Bandy, deputy director of Bullitt County Emergency Management Agency. He died on Thursday evening in a single vehicle accident off Highway 44 West.

    Thousands of emergency responders from Bullitt County and throughout the state of Kentucky came to express gratitude for Bandy’s 35-plus years of service to the community.

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - The Bullitt Advanced Math and Science Academy (BAMS) continues to achieve excellence in preparing some of the area's finest students for their college and career paths.

    BAMS recently hosted a science fair for its students, with projects specifically dedicated to research at Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest.

    The program is designed as an accelerated educational course for students, who complete their high school equivalency in two years, followed by a college associate's degree over the next two years.