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Features

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - Bullitt Lick Middle continues its efforts to rocket its way up to the hub of area schools.

    Two “crowdfunding” projects were launched to raise money toward advancing science, art and writing curriculum.

    The fundraising efforts are located on RocketHub, a website dedicated to hosting various fundraising proposal ideas.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - Having been a member while serving as a police officer in Tennessee, Charles McWhirter mentioned he had an interest in starting an Honor Guard in Bullitt County.

    The idea was bounced around among the police chiefs and sheriff in the county for several months.

    Recently, the first steps to putting a Bullitt County Honor Guard in place were taken as a group of 12 individuals went through a week’s training.

    While there is much to be done before the volunteer group of 12 law enforcement officials are on display, it is a start.

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - Scott Prewitt gets it. He understands what it's like to have family members become addicted to drugs.

    The Shepherdsville resident has been through it all, and decided to find a way to share his experiences to help others going through similar situations.

    With assistance from Lynn Foster, Greg Troutt and D.J. Troutt, a local group was formed called Better Tomorrows, designed to offer numerous ways and means of support for everyone involved with the addiction of a loved one.

  •  The FIRST Lego League Robotics team, Bullitt Blizzards, won the first-place research award for their project and placed fourth in robot table run at the FLL State Competition held at Diddle Arena at Western Kentucky University.

    The team advanced to state competition at the Engineers of Tomorrow regional tournament held in December. At that competition, the team won the mechanical design award for their robot BB3.

    Team members include Eli Dalton, Caryn Thomas, Tyler Thomas, Hannah Pyles, Lilly Mooney, Ethan Pyles and Ryan Dalton.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON - Spring Break can’t get here fast enough for students and teachers. But there are at least three students whose break that’s already begun on a high note.

    Mount Washington Middle students Jaydon Sanders, Cambren Joiner and Davis Kromenacker recently won second runner-up in cinematography for a video they entered in the 2014 REEL ACTION contest. 

    The video, titled “Party Gone Wrong” depicts the consquences of underage drinking. To view the video visit www.reelactionky.com/viewing.

  •  Six weeks.  One robot.  Thirty-three Engineers of Tomorrow. Let the  “Aerial Assist” begin.

    The Engineers of Tomorrow Team 2783 has begun its sixth year  of competition.

    The team started the year with wins in St. Louis as the Industrial Safety Award and the Entrepreneur Award.

    This week, the group will be in Cincinnati with its newest team player—a fast-moving, ball-tossing and passing robot built in only six weeks.

  •   SHEPHERDSVILLE - When a local family lost its home in a fire, the community rallied in support, while the Red Cross assisted in initial support efforts.

    Members of the Shepherdsville Fire Department, who handled the fire, also wanted to help the family beyond the initial response.

    Thanks to research by the department, more funding was donated courtesy of the Firefighters Charitable Foundation, a non-profit agency based in New York that assists disaster victims.

  •  HEBRON ESTATES - The North Bullitt Drama Club presented “Spy School,” a comedy play by Don Zolidis.

    The story is based in 1961, featuring “a typical house, a typical high school, a typical CIA training facility.”

    The main character, Priscilla, a.k.a. Jane Doe (played by Ali Tilford), is taken from her regular home and family, trained by the CIA and then placed into a similar school, with a family of CIA agents in disguise at home.

    “Spy School” was produced by North Bullitt instructor Adam Elliott.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - For the past three years, Tammy Ott and a small group of volunteers have been trying to do the “right thing.”

    The mission has been to relocate and preserve the Bowman Valley School House.

    Since 1916, the two-room schoolhouse educated African-American students until its closure in 1957 after the end of segregation.

    The dream is to have the last remaining known schoolhouse for African Americans to be relocated next to the Woodsdale one-room schoolhouse on Highway 44, next to the Bullitt County Board of Education.

  • NICHOLS - Nichols Elementary principal Sheri Hamilton doesn't speak with a forked tongue, but her new friend has one. 

    Hamilton challenged Nichols students to read 3,000 minutes for Read Across America Week. If they did it, she promised to wear a snake. The student body responded to the challenge with a total of over 10, minutes. 

    Maggie, 4-year-old ball python, was about four feet in length, just the right size to fit around the principal's neck and shoulders. 

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE--When Susan Gardner heard about the ARTfest contest last month she knew instantly she wanted to participate.

    “I’m a big fan of the Bullitt County Public Library,” said the Shepherdsville resident.

    The festival was started this year, said Patrick Yaeger, who works in the outreach department of the library, as a way for the community to display their art while celebrating National Women’s History month.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - When Dr. Swannie Jett arrived at the Bullitt County Public Health Department, his mission was to become more involved in the community.

    A key part of that was to educate the public on health issues. And to alert the public that the health department was more than a place for those needing to get a shot.

    That mission is probably a big part of Bullitt County’s high marks in the 2013 Kentucky KIDS COUNT survey.

    In the area of health, Bullitt County ranked 12th out of 120 counties.

  •  MOUNT WASHINGTON--Justin Hornback has always loved teaching since he started with Bible classes when he was 18 years-old but he never imagined it would turn into a career for him.

  • MOUNT WASHINGTON--A labor of love has kept some residents at Elmcroft Senior Living warm this winter.

  • MOUNT WASHINGTON--Pleasant Grove Elementary students wore their PJs to school one day to support of their classmates. Third grade student Kaleb Cooper recently passed after battling cancer. PGES principal Melissa Whicker said it has been a sad time, but "we have seen an outpouring from families wanting to donate and help."

  •  The Bullitt County Court Appointed Special Advocates recently hired Lynn Martin as its part-time volunteer coordinator.

    He will be working to recruit, train and support volunteers to serve additional children who are in the court system as a result of abuse or neglect.

    As a father of two grown children and a long-time CASA volunteer, Lynn brings other especially relevant experiences to the job. 

  •  FRANKFORT – Online registration for Kentucky’s hunter education programs is now statewide.

    The new system, which was tested in various regions of the state last fall, will help speed up the delivery of hunter education cards to participants.

    “This is part of an overall effort by the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources to improve services to the public,” said Jamie Cook, the agency’s mentor hunting coordinator. “Online registration makes the process much more efficient.”

  •  HEBRON ESTATES - Band students from Hebron Middle participated in the KMEA Solo and Ensemble Festival at East Oldham Middle School on Saturday, Feb. 22.

    The following students were recognized with distinguished ratings:

    *Elizabeth Hines

    *Tyler Self

    *Maiyuki Druen

    *Emily Grau

    *Abigail Mackin

    *Katie VanderEspt

    The following students earned Proficient ratings:

    *Abey Hicks

    *Amber Gore

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - In determining the county’s health in terms of family and community, the 2013 Kentucky KIDS COUNT survey looks at four diverse areas.

    And, when those numbers are tallied, Bullitt County was 13th out of 120 counties in the state.

    One of the areas probed was the percentage of births to mothers who did not have a high school degree from 2009-11.

    In Bullitt County, it was determined that 12.3 percent of the births during that span was to mothers who had not earned their high school degrees.

  •  Mother Nature continues to have her grip on Bullitt County.

    On Sunday, Bullitt Countians were met with a little freezing rain, some sleet and between 3-4 inches of snow.

    But it could have been much worse.

    Law enforcement officials had to deal with an increased number of traffic accidents and vehicles running off the road. 

    No major power outages were reported, despite having some minor icing issues.

    Schools were cancelled on Monday and Tuesday, pushing the end date for students to June 10.