.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  •  I recently ran across a report from Georgetown University regarding “Good Jobs” created since the end of the 2008-10 recession.  

    The study’s authors define good jobs as those paying more than $53,000 annually for a full-time, full-year worker, so we are talking about very, very good jobs for a young person starting their career in Kentucky.

    In addition, the majority of these good jobs are full time, offer health insurance and provide employer sponsored retirement plans - adding more than 30 percent on top of employee base salary.

  •  FRANKFORT – Kentucky receives national acclaim for the quality of its deer herd, and the numbers help draw the attention.

    The state has produced hundreds of trophy-class bucks over the past five seasons and hunters last season combined to take 138,899 deer overall. It was the second highest harvest total on record behind only the 2013-14 season.

  •  Frankfort – Kentucky Treasurer Todd Hollenbach says scam artists are at work again calling Kentuckians and identifying themselves as IRS representatives telling folks they owe money to the IRS and threatening legal action if they don’t pay.

    "The IRS does not initially contact taxpayers by phone so if you receive a call or get a voice message from someone claiming to be a representative from the IRS threatening to take legal action against you, it’s a good bet it’s a scam,” Hollenbach said.

  •  We will look back 25, 50, 75, and 99 years to capture glimpses of what was happening in Bullitt County in each of these years. Today we will focus on the month of August.

     

    1990 - 25 Years Ago.

    I wonder if Julie Wilkins remembers getting her picture taken while she washed cars during the Bullitt Central Football Boosters car wash?

  •  Kate Browning was born in 1869 in Bullitt County, Kentucky.  Her parents were Joseph Browning and Eliza Hilton. 

    The Browning family was extremely poor.  Katie and her family lived in Browning-town, Kentucky. 

    Browningtown is 20 miles outside Louisville, adjacent to the town of Solitude and near the Salt River.  

    The Browning family was the founders of this town and the town was name after the Browning family.  They built houses and the Browningtown Hotel in that area.

  •  FRANKFORT – It is the third week of August and already it is the third wettest summer on record for Frankfort and the fifth wettest for Louisville. Corn fields across most of Kentucky look robust as do pastures, yards and soybean fields.

    This portends excellent conditions for the dove season opener on Tuesday, Sept. 1.

  •  LOUISVILLE - Kentucky has some of the highest cancer rates in the country. In order to improve those statistics, KentuckyOne Health and the Kentucky Cancer Program and affiliates have teamed up to provide screening opportunities for five different cancers at the Kentucky State Fair, August 20-30, 2015.

  •  

    Your Better Business Bureau will be out at the KY State Fair! Stop by booth MS-12 in Main Street, KY in the South Wing of the KY Fair & Exposition Center. Pick up the latest BBB Wise Buying Guide – hot of the press, and also get information on scams, internet safety, credit, and more!

     

    Here are more tips while you are out at the fair:

     

  •  Since last March, a cloud has been hanging over the heads of about 700 homes and businesses.

    A sewer plant literally blew up. Since thing, the future of their service provider has been up in the air.

    Most recently, a pump operated by Bullitt Utilities has failed. Some sewage is being pumped to and handled by the Bullitt County Sanitation District. Some is running on the ground and in a stream.

  •  Things were a little scary on Monday night.

    There was a little bit of deja vu in the air at Southeast Bullitt Fire Department.

    Just a week or so shy of possibly having an agreement to merge the two controlling boards, things seemed to be a bit shaky.

    While most of the faces have changed, you could get the sense of uneasiness.

    On this particular night, the Southeast Bullitt Fire Protection District board was to set a tax rate for the coming year.

  •  I saw a graphic the other day that showed Americans’ confidence in various major US institutions (the military, small business, organized labor, the police, newspapers, organized religion, Congress, etc.) and compared today’s level with historical averages.

    Unfortunately, it was generally negative, in that all but two (the military and small business) institutions are afforded less confidence now than the historic average of this Gallup Poll (by the way, they didn’t ask about Americans’ confidence in opinion polls).

  •   See the latest scams in BBB’s August 2015 Hot Topics

    1.    Local consumers are receiving letters in the mail from an out-of-town attorney referencing unclaimed property. The attorney offers the consumer help to claim it, for a fee. You can find out if you have unclaimed property or cash - for free – just contact your State Treasury or go to unclaimed.org.

  •  LOUISVILLE -- Kentucky Farm Bureau’s (KFB) Board of Directors met last week with gubernatorial candidates Jack Conway and Matt Bevin to discuss positions on issues affecting the state’s agriculture industry.

    Conway (D) and Bevin (R) fielded questions from the KFB leaders and explained their positions during the two-hour meeting at the farm organization’s state office.

    KFB President Mark Haney said the meeting gave the organization’s leadership and all Kentuckians an opportunity to gauge the differences between the two on key issues.

  •  You can still make a difference.

    When state highway officials mentioned that they would possibly not fix Old Preston Highway in northern Bullitt County, people came alive.

    Business owners, residents and motorists began to light up the phone lines to state Rep. Linda Belcher and magistrate Joe Laswell.

    They, in turn, called state transportation officials about their possible inclination to keep the road closed due to the broken culvert.

    A little pressure from this newspaper may have added to the fuel.

  •  The first day of the 2015-2016 school year for students is Wednesday, Aug. 12.

    Children starting kindergarten get a preview (along with their parents) Thursday, July 16, during the district’s annual Kindergarten Kickoff from 4-7 p.m. at the Paroquet Springs Conference Centre in Shepherdsville.

    The free event is sponsored by the Bullitt County Public Schools Family Resource Centers.

  •  We know that there is a protected grass issue which is delaying the final phase of the Preston Highway expansion program.

    The stretch between Ruhl Acres and Highway 44 have hit a snag as EPA officials try to figure out how to protect the Glade Cress grass.

    But the other sections of new Preston Highway, along with a portion of Old Preston, must be finished as soon as possible.

    First, the culvert on Old Preston Highway needs to be replaced and the road reopened. Deciding that the road should not be fixed and reopened is not an option.

  •  FRANKFORT-– This July 4th we will celebrate the 239nd birthday of our great nation, when our forefathers unveiled the document that would help form the foundation of our United States, the Declaration of Independence. 

  • By now, you may have heard that our graduating senior class of 2015 rose to the challenge I posed to them back in the spring of 2011 when I spoke to them as exiting 8thgraders.

  • FRANKFORT – Fireworks are a tradition that go hand-in-hand with the Fourth of July.

     

    But all too often, that tradition can lead to injury. That’s why the Kentucky Optometric Association is urging families to take precautions to protect themselves and their children against the potential dangers of fireworks.

     

  •  What would a healthier Bullitt County look like?

    What goes into making a healthier community? 

    What needs to happen to make Bullitt County a healthier community by 2020?

    It has been five years since these questions were initially asked in the county. It is time to ask them again and assess whether there was any progress made toward a healthier county and what still needs to be done.