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Opinion

  •  The most productive and significant legislative session in modern history has officially come to an end. 

    Although it was a short, 30-day session, the General Assembly has accomplished more in 2017 than we have in most 60-day sessions. 

    When Republicans took the majority in the House of Representatives last November, Speaker Hoover came right in and declared that the House would once again be a functioning institution. 

  •   Long nights, intense debate, and media attention from across the globe wrapped up what started as a quiet final week of the 2017 Session of the Kentucky General Assembly. 

    Minutes before the Senate gaveled out for good, Gov. Matt Bevin called this session the most productive in history. 

    It was truly an honor to work alongside the governor with the new House Majority to pass many great initiatives for our commonwealth. 

    Critics and supporters alike have noted the session was among the busiest our state has ever seen. 

  •  We are normally not all that excited when the way to solve a problem is to form a committee or a task force.

    However, Bullitt County Judge Melanie Roberts may have reached the only possible solution to the barks and howls over the operation of the animal shelter when she recommended a committee.

    Of course, we’ve not seen a committee where the entire fiscal court is part of the group. But, we’ll give it a shot.

    Currently, there is no possbile chance that the current animal control director and the county judge will agree on anything.

  •  In honor of National Distracted Driving Awareness Month, the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety (KOHS) and law enforcement agencies are asking drivers to keep their eyes on the road and hands on the wheel as part of the U Drive. U Text. U Pay. campaign. 

  •    In observance of Child Abuse Month in April, a nine-year-old student at Crossroads Elementary wrote the following essay:

  •  LEXINGTON – As warmer weather gives way to outdoor projects that call for digging into the ground, Kentucky Utilities Company and Louisville Gas and Electric Company urge area residents to remember three crucial numbers: 8-1-1.

  •  It’s kind of funny how quickly one discussion can lead to another and how a non-issue becomes a major issue.

    Shepherdsville mayor Curtis Hockenbury and the council started a recent conversation about whether an agency could be given access to the community center several hours a day.

    Before you could bat an eye, the public works department would take over the use of the Shepherdsville Community Center and several groups would be left looking for other options.

    The decision took a matter of minutes.

  •  FRANKFORT – In honor of National Distracted Driving Awareness Month, the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety (KOHS) and law enforcement agencies are asking drivers to keep their eyes on the road and hands on the wheel as part of the U Drive. U Text. U Pay. campaign.

  •  As many of you know, in this past legislative session, we have taken significant action to reform education in Kentucky.

    Regardless of all of the hyperbole, our reforms will go a long way in providing better educational opportunities for some of the students in our state who so desperately need it.

    The Governor recently signed House Bill 520 into law, making Kentucky the 44th state to allow for the establishment of charter schools.

  •  FRANKFORT - With the start of youth spring turkey hunting season less than a week away, the Kentucky Division of Forestry (KDF) is urging hunters carrying on the state's rich hunting traditions to be especially careful during Spring Forest Fire Season.

    KDF offers the following tips for a wildfire-safe hunting experience.

    · BE CAREFUL WITH ALL FIRES: Whether a campfire, gas lantern, cook stove, barbecue, etc., all can quickly start fires in dry forests.

  •  Instead of starting your morning with breakfast, you start by packing up your things. 

    Your mom says our stay at the hotel is over and we have to find a new place to go.

    You’re late to school again because mom’s car wouldn’t start this morning and you had to find a ride there. 

    She kisses you goodbye telling you everything will be okay, but you’re not so sure.

    Your stomach rumbles, but you’re too late for breakfast. 

  •  FRANKFORT – We are in the final stretch of the Regular Session and the House has been hard at work to better Kentucky. 

    We passed a variety of measures as of late that will expand educational choice in Kentucky, reform our legal system, and positively benefit our area. 

  •  Sunshine Week is celebrated across the nation every March to highlight the importance of open government and how only transparency can ensure accountability. 

    In Kentucky, Sunshine Week (March 12-18) could not come at a more important time, as the very protections afforded by our state’s Open Records laws are being attacked, and could even be eviscerated, by some of our public universities.

  •  Over the past decade, transparency in government has been the big buzzword.

    As we celebrate Sunshine Week across the nation, it is important that the public takes an active role in its government.

    In a recent survey by Pulse Research Inc. in Kentucky, the overwhelming finding is that people still read newspapers.

    And, one of the key items they look for in their local newspaper is legal notices.

    This survey which was one in which individuals were invited to go online, over 340 people participated.

  •  FRANKFORT — With just a few days left of the 2017 session of the Kentucky General Assembly, much work remains, but much has been accomplished, especially as of late. Important legislation has passed on a variety of fronts, including education reform, reforms to our legal system, and promoting industrial hemp in Kentucky.

    At the end of last week, the House passed critical legislation that would expand school choice, and provide more opportunities for low-income children to receive a high quality education.

  •  Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency provides services for people in Bullitt, Shelby and Spencer counties and approximately eight years ago I accepted the position of Executive Director and made Kentucky my new home.  

    While I was not raised in Bullitt County, it certainly reminds me of my home county of Perry County, Ind.—predominantly a farming community with down to earth people who care about their neighbors and are willing to give a helping hand.

    Now I need to ask our neighbors for support.   

  •  See the latest scams in BBB’s March 2017 Hot Topics:

    Hoping to be the next MTV Real World cast member? A local consumer was contacted by the “casting crew” and sent in pictures. After she was “selected,” she was then asked to give money to hold her spot during the casting call. This is a scam.

  •  The governing body in Mount Washington has taken a different approach to bringing in needed businesses to its community.

    Recently, the city purchased a building which got its start as a Pizza Hut many, many years ago.

    The price, including the existing restaurant equipment, was a cool $550,000.

    Most governmental agencies do not have that kind of money to spend.

  •  As a kick-off to National Consumer Protection Week, the BBB Institute for Marketplace Trust has compiled information for the first BBB Scam Tracker Annual Risk Report.

    The information gathered by BBB Scam Tracker in 2016 has some surprising insights into exposure, susceptibility, and monetary loss.

    Reanna Smith-Hamblin, President/CEO of Better Business Bureau serving Louisville, Southern Indiana, and Western Kentucky, says “This study shows that people from all demographics are vulnerable to scams.”

  •  FRANKFORT- The pace in Frankfort has picked up substantially, as another week of committee meetings, ceremonies, and floor votes have gone by. We have passed a variety of bipartisan legislation that will go far in increasing government transparency and caring for the most vulnerable among us. 

    At the end of last week, we passed an amended version of Senate Bill 2, which will go back to the Senate for concurrence and then on to the Governor for his signature.