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Opinion

  •   AAA projects 50.9 million Americans will journey 50 miles or more away from home this Thanksgiving, a 3.3 percent increase over last year.

    The 2017 holiday weekend will see the highest Thanksgiving travel volume since 2005 with 1.6 million more people taking to the nation’s roads, skies, rails and waterways compared with last year.

  •  FRANKFORT – Today, Nov. 16, is the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout. As part of the 52 Weeks of Public Health Campaign, the Kentucky Department for Public Health within the Cabinet for Health and Family Services is raising awareness about lung cancer in Kentucky.

    Lung cancer impacts Kentuckians more than any other cancer. In Kentucky, both men and women have significantly higher rates of lung cancer than other state in the U.S. More Kentuckians have died from lung cancer than all of the next seven leading causes of cancer death combined.

  •  Mary Melvina Garrett grew up in a military family, the daughter   of Waller Lunsford and Sarah Davis Garrett.  

    She was one of seven siblings.  She was born in 1832 in Kentucky.  Her father and mother were born in Virginia. 

    Her father, Waller Lunsford was born in 1793 in Essex Co., and her mother Sarah was born in 1794.  Waller’s parents were William Garrett and Elizabeth Taylor, both of Essex Co., Virginia.

  •  Take a look at BBB’s hot topics for November 2017!

  •  On behalf of the teachers, administrators and support staff of Bullitt County Public Schools, I urge you to oppose the pension bill put forth by Governor Bevin late week.   

    Almost everyone recognizes that this is a serious issue and appreciates very much that Governor Bevin has determined to take action to rectify a problem that has festered for years.

  • (This is the third article in our four-part series on Partner Violence)

        When most people hear the phrase “domestic violence” and who have had the good fortune not to have experienced it, they think of physical violence and possibly sexual assault.  We’ll read about it or see it on TV.  The courts issue protective orders for the most part to protect a person from physical and sexual assault.

  •  We can follow the Croan Family roots going back to Maryland. The name Croan could be spelled several different ways    Robert Crone (Croan) was born 1747 in Maryland and was married to Letitia Knox.  They had several children.  They were Robert, James, John, Thomas and Elizabeth Croan.  In 1800, Robert and his family moved to Huntington, Pennsylania.   Robert died in 1832 and he was buried in the McCullochs Mills Cemetery in Pennsylvania.  Robert wife Letitia died in 1853 and her place of burial unknown.

  •  Take a look at BBB’s hot topics for October 2017

     

  •  Several months ago in Trimble County a nightmare occurred in daylight.  Lora Cable was granted a no unlawful contact domestic violence order against her partner Timothy Riddle.  The next day, Valentine’s Day, he walked into her work at a doctor’s office and killed her.

  •  The Kentucky State Treasurer’s Office has recently learned of a telephone fraud scheme listing the Kentucky State Treasury as its physical address.

    Under this scheme, an individual is notified that he or she is eligible for a “free grant” of thousands of dollars. The individual is then instructed to wire money or purchase gift cards for the scammer in exchange for the promise of receiving this “free grant.” 

  •  FRANKFORT - The Kentucky Division of Forestry (KDF) is again preparing for an active wildfire season. Each year, there are nearly 1,500 wildfires in the state of Kentucky, based on a 10-year average.

    Last fall, the division responded to 520 fires that burned 52,216 acres with a timber value loss of $20,642,663. The majority of the fires occurred in November.

  •  When Ellen heard her husband come through the door, she knew this would be a bad night. Quickly sending her kids to their room, she turned the music up so they wouldn’t hear what was coming. After last night’s beating, Ellen had made sure to do all he’d asked of her today: cooked his food, cleaned the house, washed and folded his clothes, and dressed exactly the way he wanted. Still, it was never enough. As he walked toward her, Ellen wondered just what she’d done wrong this time.

  •  After a terrible and very public tragedy such as a mass shooting, people want to help in any way possible, and that often means contributing to fundraisers to help the survivors and the families of the victims. Sadly, scammers often take advantage of these moments of vulnerability to deceive donors. In addition, there are often campaigns set up by well-meaning individuals who may or may not be directly connected to the tragedy.

  •  A final goodbye to a person who didn’t make the headlines.

    Sharon Hand was heavily involved in the Scouts and then got involved in the city of Hillview.

    First, she helped on the Hillview Emergency Response Team.

    Then, she was hired as the city’s code enforcement office.

    She wasn’t a person who wanted the spotlight. She only wanted to help her community.

    Sadly, she passed much too soon. Sharon was a true asset to the Hillview community.

    Also passing recently was Carroll Cogan.

  •  So President Trump is getting criticized for talking with leadership in the Democratic Party?

    Maybe that is the epicenter of our problems in government.

    When we elect individuals aren’t we putting them into office to do what is best -- no matter which side of the aisle has the best idea?

    Instead of criticizing the President maybe folks on his side should pay attention.

  •  Over the course of the last few weeks, I have heard from many of you who have shared your thoughts and concerns with regard to our public pension systems. 

    I realize that the recommendations that were submitted last week to the General Assembly by the consulting group who reviewed our retirement systems were troubling and unsettling.

    I know that there are many of you who have dedicated many years of public service to our communities and our state. 

  •  There was a bit of apprehension among members of a committee working to beautify the city of Shepherdsville.

    What would the people think if the city spent some money to install Christmas decorations this year?

    We think they would be overjoyed.

    We think many would say that it is about time the city looked at ways to beautify the community, especially a downtown area which has suffered for years.

    We think, unfortunately, that most citizens and business owners won’t care.

  •   We hope by the time gets into your hands that the county will have made a big decision on the future of its animal control program.

    The future of its program has been in a state of flux for months.

    Animal control officer Mark Williams had come under heat of the county judge. In fact, Melanie Roberts fired Williams but fiscal court members voted to reinstate him.

    But, he almost immediately went on medical leave, which is perfectly legal.

    The problem is that the 12-week period of his medical leave has passed.

  •  BBB serving Louisville, Southern Indiana, and Western Kentucky is alerting local consumers about the latest data breach announcement. Equifax, one of the three credit reporting bureaus, announced that personal information may have been exposed for about 143 million Americans.

  •  Take a look at BBB’s hot topics for September 2017:

    1. When disasters strike, scammers come out of the woodwork. Before you give to help Hurricane Harvey victims, check out the charity at give.org first to be sure your dollars are going to a legitimate charity.