•  Just for a few moments, the naysayers who do not believe in the progress being made by the Bullitt County Public School System -- go to the corner and be quiet.

    By this time, one would think that those who do not believe in the work being done by the school system would be convinced.

    We know they are not. And we would never expect 100 percent of the people to be standing firm in the corner of the school system -- or any other entity.

    Just for argument’s sake, the school system should earn some credit.

  •  One might believe that as we observe National Newspaper Week, there might be a bit of despair.

    Yes, the newspaper business has changed. But our need to know might be greater than ever.

    In this crazy, hectic world, there is more happening than ever.

    There's more internal disagreements. There's more frustration with our governmental agencies.

    There is never a shortage of news. And that’s just the stuff you might see on the nightly news.

    Bullitt County has so much more going on and all of it is not bad.

  •  WASHINGTON -- The power of the press rests in the ability of journalists to hold government accountable, to mobilize public opinion on matters that are important to individuals, communities or the nation, and to provide necessary information of value.

    Notice in those words not a mention of celebrity content, mobile devices nor‚ 'aspirational‚' reportage that feels good without doing any good.

  •  See the latest scams in BBB’s October 2015 Hot Topics

  • The earlier Johnson family came into Kentucky in the late 1780’s from Maryland.  Bullitt County did not become a County until 1796.

    The Ephraim Johnson family settled in the area known as the small stream called Cane Run, three miles north of what is now known as Lebanon Junction, Kentucky.

    There was a station located down on the lower creek at the place known as Holsclaw.

  •  Is there a need for more rehabilitation work done in the area of drug abuse?

    There is no question that the answer is yes.

    But, does anyone want such a facility in their back yard?

    The answer to that is also simple -- no.

    What local businessman Kenny Hester quickly learned was that rumors spread quickly.

    When he heard that a proposed 10,000 square foot building he would build and lease could house a methadone clinic, Hester went on the offensive.

  •  It is with much sadness that we bid farewell to Jenny Estepp, executive director of the Bullitt County Chamber of Commerce.

    Over the past two-plus years as director, Estepp has brought a certain energy to the efforts.

    Much work has been done to get more people involved in the various Chamber activities.

    More networking opportunities have been developed to get some of the non-traditional Chamber regulars more involved.

    It is a younger, more vibrant Chamber than in years past.

  •   I made an appointment to speak with both KIPDA and District 5 Transportation to ask questions and get updates. 

    Bullitt County has received very few projects/funds from KIPDA during the last 7-8 years. 

    During the meeting we had a very frank discussion about the REASONS why. KIPDA offered to hold a workshop to help Bullitt County Government officials understand how to make request, when to make requests and the types of funding available. 

  •  There are easy decisions and there are good decisions.

    While we understand the desire to lower tax rates, three members of Bullitt Fiscal Court were exactly right in at least keeping the real estate property tax the same for 2015.

    Keeping the current rate will at least generate a little more revenue for the county. Dropping down to the compensating rate would have been a grand gesture but not a sound one.

  •  See the latest scams in BBB’s September 2015 Hot Topics


    1.    Beware of Ashley Madison-related phishing scams. The most recent offers a link to the "Ashley Madison Client List," but instead infects the user’s computer with banking malware, or locks up files until the user pays the scammer “to get it fixed.”

  •  I recently ran across a report from Georgetown University regarding “Good Jobs” created since the end of the 2008-10 recession.  

    The study’s authors define good jobs as those paying more than $53,000 annually for a full-time, full-year worker, so we are talking about very, very good jobs for a young person starting their career in Kentucky.

    In addition, the majority of these good jobs are full time, offer health insurance and provide employer sponsored retirement plans - adding more than 30 percent on top of employee base salary.

  •  FRANKFORT – Kentucky receives national acclaim for the quality of its deer herd, and the numbers help draw the attention.

    The state has produced hundreds of trophy-class bucks over the past five seasons and hunters last season combined to take 138,899 deer overall. It was the second highest harvest total on record behind only the 2013-14 season.

  •  Frankfort – Kentucky Treasurer Todd Hollenbach says scam artists are at work again calling Kentuckians and identifying themselves as IRS representatives telling folks they owe money to the IRS and threatening legal action if they don’t pay.

    "The IRS does not initially contact taxpayers by phone so if you receive a call or get a voice message from someone claiming to be a representative from the IRS threatening to take legal action against you, it’s a good bet it’s a scam,” Hollenbach said.

  •  We will look back 25, 50, 75, and 99 years to capture glimpses of what was happening in Bullitt County in each of these years. Today we will focus on the month of August.


    1990 - 25 Years Ago.

    I wonder if Julie Wilkins remembers getting her picture taken while she washed cars during the Bullitt Central Football Boosters car wash?

  •  Kate Browning was born in 1869 in Bullitt County, Kentucky.  Her parents were Joseph Browning and Eliza Hilton. 

    The Browning family was extremely poor.  Katie and her family lived in Browning-town, Kentucky. 

    Browningtown is 20 miles outside Louisville, adjacent to the town of Solitude and near the Salt River.  

    The Browning family was the founders of this town and the town was name after the Browning family.  They built houses and the Browningtown Hotel in that area.

  •  FRANKFORT – It is the third week of August and already it is the third wettest summer on record for Frankfort and the fifth wettest for Louisville. Corn fields across most of Kentucky look robust as do pastures, yards and soybean fields.

    This portends excellent conditions for the dove season opener on Tuesday, Sept. 1.

  •  LOUISVILLE - Kentucky has some of the highest cancer rates in the country. In order to improve those statistics, KentuckyOne Health and the Kentucky Cancer Program and affiliates have teamed up to provide screening opportunities for five different cancers at the Kentucky State Fair, August 20-30, 2015.


    Your Better Business Bureau will be out at the KY State Fair! Stop by booth MS-12 in Main Street, KY in the South Wing of the KY Fair & Exposition Center. Pick up the latest BBB Wise Buying Guide – hot of the press, and also get information on scams, internet safety, credit, and more!


    Here are more tips while you are out at the fair:


  •  Since last March, a cloud has been hanging over the heads of about 700 homes and businesses.

    A sewer plant literally blew up. Since thing, the future of their service provider has been up in the air.

    Most recently, a pump operated by Bullitt Utilities has failed. Some sewage is being pumped to and handled by the Bullitt County Sanitation District. Some is running on the ground and in a stream.

  •  Things were a little scary on Monday night.

    There was a little bit of deja vu in the air at Southeast Bullitt Fire Department.

    Just a week or so shy of possibly having an agreement to merge the two controlling boards, things seemed to be a bit shaky.

    While most of the faces have changed, you could get the sense of uneasiness.

    On this particular night, the Southeast Bullitt Fire Protection District board was to set a tax rate for the coming year.