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Opinion

  •  FRANKFORT --- As legislators were debating Friday night whether to give final approval to a major revenue bill, someone brought up the old joke about how most of us would prefer to fund government: Don’t tax you, don’t tax me; tax that fellow behind the tree.

    Based on that, those supporting this new law must have a large tree in mind, because that’s where they placed 95 percent of us, according to an analysis by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy.

  •  We’ve reached the point where signs are going up and advertisements are being placed in the local newspaper.

    We have reached the point where there is less than five weeks until the primary election on May 22.

    As a service to the public, the Bullitt County Chamber of Commerce and The Pioneer News have partnered, with the assistance of city officials in Mount Washington, Lebanon Junction, Shepherdsville and Hillview, to host a series of forums.

  •  It’s that time of year again and the Postal Service, health care providers and animal protection professionals need your help.

    Last year, 6,244 letter carriers were bitten or attacked by dogs nationwide. But that pales in comparison to the more than 4.5 million people — most of them children and the elderly — who are bitten by dogs each year.

    You can help protect your letter carrier, meter reader, newspaper delivery person and neighbors’ children by making sure your pet is properly restrained.

  •  Since our primary job in even-year sessions is writing a 2-year budget, many people consider April 2 the most important day we’ve had thus far.

    That was the day that, for the first time in memory House and Senate agreed on a budget and passed it to the governor in time to consider override of any vetoes he might issue.

  •  FRANKFORT -- The common thread binding all good legislation is that, by the time the actual vote arrives, the outcome is all but a foregone conclusion.

    It takes a lot of effort to get to that point, of course.

    Stakeholders need to be included early on, because they are the ones who will be most affected by any change, and the public must have the chance to weigh in as well.

    It’s a process that can take months, but when it works, the positive impact is measured in years.

  •  It was fun while it lasted but its welcome was worn out quite quickly.

    The issue on medical marijuana was a popular one in Bullitt County.

    Proponents of the medical marijuana legislation even made it to a meeting of the Fox Chase City Council -- albeit a dozen or so people present.

    This shows the commitment the cause has for the legalization of medical marijuana.

  •  It seems like just yesterday when the Shepherdsville City Council might have been described as dysfunctional.

    Legal issues were flying. Councilmembers weren’t attending meetings. Without a quorum, meetings had to be cancelled.

    Lo and behold, we had elections. There were a majority of new councilmembers elected. A new mayor was placed into office by the voters.

    Good times seemed to be ahead.

    Well, the honeymoon lasted for awhile but things seemed to unravel at the latter part of 2017.

  •  Take a look at BBB’s hot topics for April 2018!

     

  •  FRANKFORT -- Of all the facts and figures surrounding the public-pension debate, two speak volumes about what happened last Thursday at the Capitol: nine and 291.

    The first is about how many hours it took for House and Senate leaders to publicly unveil their plan to reform the state’s public retirement systems and then steamroll it through both chambers.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE – There were six players this winter that played basketball at Spalding University in Louisville, both males and females.

    That is great. All six of those players had stories about their college signings in this newspaper.

    And they all had something else in common. Not one of them got paid a dime based on their basketball ability.

    Spalding is an NCAA Division III program. Division III programs are not allowed to give athletic aid. 

  •  Dear Gov. Matt Bevin:

    In response to your recent interview, I would like to formally invite you to observe the teachers at Bullitt Central High School to personally witness just how “selfish and short-sighted” they really are.

    If you get here early enough (and I mean EARLY!), you will see the following: 

    *Teachers getting here before their contractual work day begins to meet with students that have been absent or are perhaps just “not quite getting it”;

  •  Much has been made about protests recently.

    Whether it is those fighting for their pensions or whether it is those fighting for a sense of security in the schools, the media has had plenty of protests to cover.

    The question is a simple one -- have partisan politics, stupid comments, social media and lobby groups resulted in causing the leaders of this country and state to no longer be able to sit down and talk?

    It seems that all of the above is true. We no longer have folks who can sit down and talk to opposing groups. 

  •      We will be looking back 25, 50, 75, and 100 years to see what was being printed in The Pioneer News in 1993, 1968, 1943, and 1918 in the month of March.

     

    1993 - 25 Years Ago.

    After a late snow, young Johnny Laun was pictured shoveling snow off a Buckman Street sidewalk.

  •   As we bear down on the end of the 2018 Regular Session, it’s become crunch time in Frankfort. This week has seen many bills pass both the full House and House Committees, but there has been a clear focus on public safety and the brave Kentuckians who dedicate their lives to protecting us each and every day. 

  •   FRANKFORT -- Since the budget and pensions are what we hear about almost daily, it is certainly understandable if the public thinks that is what this year’s legislative session is all about.

    While the fate of those bills is what will ultimately be remembered most from the General Assembly’s time in the Capitol this year, that shouldn’t overshadow the many other important issues that the House and Senate are also considering.

  •  FRANKFORT -- The transportation bill passed the House last week and is on its way to the Senate.

    Bullitt County did better than many other districts.

    Current projects retained funding and several new projects were added.

    Our hope is that the Senate makes no changes to the road plan for Bullitt County.

    On a related transportation issue, the House approved a bill last week dealing with disability placards for parking.

  •   Daylight saving time begins at 2 a.m. Sunday, March 11, when most U.S. states will spring forward an hour.

    With the change comes a change in when the sun rises and sets, and that can affect drivers and pedestrians.

    Across the nation, pedestrian deaths have increased— and that’s why AAA East Central urges all adults to pay attention while driving or walking outdoors as everyone adjusts to the time change.