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Opinion

  •   As the flood water recedes in the local area, BBB serving Louisville, Southern Indiana, and Western KY is warning flood victims who are seeking flood damage repairs to beware of scammers.

    After going through a flood, people you do not know may knock on your door, offering discounted flood repair services. Some of these individuals may not be legitimate. Scammers travel to disaster areas to take advantage of those who want life to go back to “normal.” Some may claim your insurance agent or FEMA sent them to your home or business.

  •   Only two legislative days remain in the 2015 Regular Session of the Kentucky General Assembly, and the fate of several major pieces of legislation -- including the House Majority’s efforts to shore up the Kentucky Teachers Retirement System (KTRS) and reduce heroin addiction -- now rest in the fate of conference committees.

  •   FRANKFORT – The gavel dropped shortly before midnight on Wednesday of this week, recessing us until March 23rd for the veto period of the 2015 Regular Session.  And with only two days left to go until the session ends, several major issues remain unresolved.

  •  With a lot of sponsors and a lot of support, the Bullitt County Chamber of Commerce pulled off yet another successful KidsFest.

    While we admit we had some concern over the $1 per person admission charge, there weren’t any screaming or hollering.

    The Shepherdsville Police Department softened the blow by providing funding to pay for the admission of the first 500 through the gates.

    It is these community events that need to be stressed as a way to show that Bullitt Countians can come together at times.

  •  See the latest scams and bad business in BBB’s March 2015 Hot Topics

  •  BBB is warning basketball fans not to fall for NCAA ticket scams as they follow their favorite basketball teams. If you are making a last-minute decision to see your favorite team in the tournament, avoid disappointment, and don’t fall for “too-good-to-be-true” ticket prices on the Internet or elsewhere.

  •  Another major snowstorm rolls through the Commonwealth again this past week, forcing us to yet again cancel session days due to the treacherous road conditions and power outages at the Capitol. 

    With fewer days remaining before the 2015 Regular Session is scheduled to end on March 24th, much of our focus will be on the major bills of this session.

  •  Returning to legislative duties in earnest last week, we addressed many key concerns in the House of Representatives, including shoring up teachers’ retirement, protecting our children against Internet intruders and increasing educational advancement for our veterans.

    It’s been a busy week, in one of the most active annual sessions on record in terms of the number of bills filed, but one that’s produced many possibilities for positive change.

  •  FRANKFORT -- Even though the snow and ice played havoc with the House, causing us to cancel meeting the previous week, we got back to work and passed several major bills for the 2015 Regular Session.

    One of the bills we debated in the House was a proposal to bond $3.3 billion for our teachers’ retirement system.

    While it is important we make sure the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System is solvent, I believe House Bill 4 is the wrong approach.

  •  Watching the Bullitt County Education Corp. work the past couple of years has been one of those positive pleasures.

    With a vision to have Jefferson Community and Technical College expand its offerings in Bullitt County, the plans to move into a spacious facility off Highway 245 seemed to be close to reality.

    But reality does not become reality until the shovels start throwing dirt and the construction company begins work on a building.

  •  When the central office was renamed in honor of retired superintendent Frank Hatfield, there was a who’s who of educational leaders who gathered.

    It was a great opportunity to honor a person who spent many years helping the field of education both in the county and throughout the state.

    With the recent passing of Marvin Stewart, another well-loved educator, it gave us reason to think.

  •  We started the week of February 16 with the record-breaking snow levels in some parts of the state, and it ended with record low temperatures in others.

    In between, we endured more snow and saw the emergency workers and road crews of the state working hard to keep us safe. 

    With 100 Representatives covering all corners of the state, and the state police and transportation officials encouraging motorists to stay off the roads, House Leadership exercised caution and delayed legislative proceedings for the House of Representatives. 

  •  One of my favorite leadership researchers is Jim Collins, who wrote a classic business book called Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don’t.

    In that book, you can find the following sentence: “Greatness is not a function of circumstance. Greatness, it turns out, is largely a matter of conscious choice, and discipline.

    This can be applied to far more than making a business successful.

  •  Nathaniel Pope was born in 1603 in Gloucester, England. 

    In 1630, he married Lucy Anne Fox in England.  They started a family before leaving England and traveling to America.  Before leaving England, Nathaniel and Lucy had four children.  They were Nathaniel, William, Margaret and Elizabeth Pope.

    Nathaniel and his family boarded the ship which departed from England and made the long journey to America. 

  •  FRANKFORT -- The 2015 Session of the Kentucky General Assembly is nearing the halfway point, and with few days left to take up legislation a flurry of key bills passed in the House this past week.

    Among the bills passed in the House include allowing a local option sales tax in Kentucky, combating the growing issue of heroin in our Commonwealth, and proposals to raise the minimum wage and implement a smoking ban across the state.

  •  Many years ago, a very intelligent and well-respected man told us that there was no drug problem in Bullitt County.

    Even 25 years ago, there was a drug problem in the county and in the region.

    Now, there is another problem that many would like to ignore -- homelessness.

    We’re not talking about someone who lost his or her home due to financial problems. We’re talking about people who are literally walking around with no clue where  they might spend t he next night.

  •  FRANKFORT - Kentuckians are being dealt a wintery weather blast and KSP is asking motorists to be aware that weather conditions may change rapidly over the next few days.

    “Winter weather provides new challenges and responsibilities to the public and the Kentucky State Police,” says KSP spokesman Sgt. Michael Webb.

  •  Heavy snow and ice, as well as frozen soil conditions, can damage cherished trees and shrubs in residential landscapes.

    Even areas without major snowfall experience high winds and huge fluctuations in temperatures during winter. But homeowners can lessen the adverse effects of winter weather with preventive maintenance.

    What can happen in winter, and how can you avoid it?

  •  It’s our first week back in this second part of the 2015 session of the Kentucky General Assembly, our shorter annual session held in odd-numbered years.

    I’m glad to be back doing the work of the 49th district.

    Earlier in January, we elected our leadership, established committee assignments, and adopted rules of procedure before returning to our districts to touch base with you and your concerns. 

  •  Erik Butler is saying all the right things and tackling all the right issues.

    Our assumption is that by the time you are reading this, Butler would have officially been hired as the new chief of the Southeast Bullitt Fire Department.

    The board was to meet on Tuesday night with Butler expecting to be named chief.

    Even with the interim tag around his neck, Butler has made some great strides.