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Opinion

  •  Every parent wants their children to succeed in life.  Early on, parents can help by making sure that their child can read.  And they need to keep them in school.  This is the parent's responsibility, but some in Frankfort want to take that responsibility away from them by mandating school attendance until they're 18 years old. 

  •   Redistricting took another turn this week when the judge returned his opinion disagreeing with our plan and directing members of the Kentucky General Assembly to run in our old districts.

  •  Unless you have a large trust fund or have won a big lottery jackpot, you know what it means to make economic choices.  Do you buy these shoes, or do you buy those groceries? Do you get the data plan at $25/month or stick with text messages and put $25 a month away for a college fund for your baby (which could add up to about $8,500 by graduation day).

  •  Forget all the politcal talk. Forget all the special interest involvement. It is time to put the issue on whether Kentucky should have gambling on the general election ballot.

  •    If you are going to send flowers, candy, or gifts for Valentine’s Day do your homework first!

    When buying flowers, consumers should be especially careful when making the purchase online or over the phone. Consumers should review the description of the floral arrangement and be sure they know exactly what their loved one will be getting. When doing business with a florist, keep the following in mind:

  •  In his state of the Commonwealth address, Governor Beshear laid it out fairly straight- we have to tighten our belts.  Again.  Like every responsible family in the Commonwealth we need to establish a reasonable budget, and exercise the discipline to stick to it.  We've been doing a pretty good job of that for the last four years, although we haven't been shy about our bonding (which is borrowing money on a 20-year payback.)

  •  Check out the latest scams and bad business in BBB’s February 2012 Hot Topics!

     

    1.    There’s a new twist to the BBB Phishing Scam. Businesses are receiving calls from someone who says they are with the BBB, wanting to help them remove a virus from their computer due to a phishing scam. BBB is NOT making these calls!

  •  FRANKFORT While no one can predict exactly what will pass in a regular legislative session, one constant can always be counted on: Diversity. Last week was a textbook example of that in action in the Kentucky House, with legislation ranging from wild pigs to alternative energy projects.

  •  Valentine’s Day is right around the corner! Are you looking for love? Millions use dating and social networking sites to meet people. While many are looking to start a successful relationship, there are those using these sites to take advantage of others. Unfortunately, the anonymity of the internet makes it easy for con artists to use these sites to meet potential victims.

  •  Circuit Judge Rodney Burress certainly doesn’t need the affirmation of this newspaper on any of his opinions.

  •   A Nelson County man asked me about charter schools, wondering why public charter schools don't have to follow the same rules as traditional public schools; and if charter schools are better (which he doubts), why don't the traditional schools change the way they're doing business to imitate charter schools?  The answers lie in centralized control and mandatory attendance. Let's take a look at how Kentucky sets things up.

  •  The Super Bowl is right around the corner! Better Business Bureau is warning consumers to be on the look-out for knock-off team jerseys, counterfeit memorabilia, and phony game day tickets.

  •  When we put out the call for people to come out and serve the community, we’re not talking about law enforcement or military personnel.

  •  Each year thousands of teens are killed or injured in traffic crashes as a result of underage drinking. 

  •  FRANKFORT During the opening days of most legislative sessions in even-numbered years, the primary focus is getting bills moving through committee and readying for the governor’s budget proposal.

    As many of you may know, however, this year is somewhat different, as the General Assembly is also taking on the once-in-a-decade task of redrawing the population boundaries for itself, the Kentucky Supreme Court and the state’s six congressional seats.  It’s something all states do after each Census.

  •  There is good news and bad news for Kentucky as your General Assembly drafts a new biennial budget during this year's legislative session.  Let's start with the good news:  revenues are up.  

  •  On Tuesday, Jan. 17, legislators heard from the governor. Gov. Steve Beshear presents his budget proposal to the General Assembly.

    As I have reported in the past, our budget situation is serious and while the General Assembly directed cost-cutting measures and other efficiencies such as reducing personal service contracts and merit employees (those who are politically appointed) in the budget, the Governor vetoed those measures. Now, he will issue his solution to our state’s budget problems.

  •  While nothing is final until the bill is approved and signed by the governor, it appears the hard work of local residents will pay off in the latest redistricting of legislative boundaries.

  • 2011 proved to be a busy year for the BBB serving Louisville, Southern Indiana, and Western Kentucky. Here is a snapshot of the services BBB provided:

    ·        Provided more than 612,000 BBB Business Reports online in 2011;

    ·        Provided more than 10,000 BBB Business Reports over the phone;

    ·        Closed more than 6,300 complaints.

  •  The five members of the Bullitt County Board of Education oversee a $100 million budget and make decisions about multimillion-dollar building projects. But they also make certain the individual child in the Bullitt County Public School district gets what he or she needs to successfully learn in school and beyond. All that is done in the face of shrinking state and federal dollars for education and tough economic times locally.