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Opinion

  •  Returning to legislative duties in earnest last week, we addressed many key concerns in the House of Representatives, including shoring up teachers’ retirement, protecting our children against Internet intruders and increasing educational advancement for our veterans.

    It’s been a busy week, in one of the most active annual sessions on record in terms of the number of bills filed, but one that’s produced many possibilities for positive change.

  •  FRANKFORT -- Even though the snow and ice played havoc with the House, causing us to cancel meeting the previous week, we got back to work and passed several major bills for the 2015 Regular Session.

    One of the bills we debated in the House was a proposal to bond $3.3 billion for our teachers’ retirement system.

    While it is important we make sure the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System is solvent, I believe House Bill 4 is the wrong approach.

  •  Watching the Bullitt County Education Corp. work the past couple of years has been one of those positive pleasures.

    With a vision to have Jefferson Community and Technical College expand its offerings in Bullitt County, the plans to move into a spacious facility off Highway 245 seemed to be close to reality.

    But reality does not become reality until the shovels start throwing dirt and the construction company begins work on a building.

  •  When the central office was renamed in honor of retired superintendent Frank Hatfield, there was a who’s who of educational leaders who gathered.

    It was a great opportunity to honor a person who spent many years helping the field of education both in the county and throughout the state.

    With the recent passing of Marvin Stewart, another well-loved educator, it gave us reason to think.

  •  We started the week of February 16 with the record-breaking snow levels in some parts of the state, and it ended with record low temperatures in others.

    In between, we endured more snow and saw the emergency workers and road crews of the state working hard to keep us safe. 

    With 100 Representatives covering all corners of the state, and the state police and transportation officials encouraging motorists to stay off the roads, House Leadership exercised caution and delayed legislative proceedings for the House of Representatives. 

  •  One of my favorite leadership researchers is Jim Collins, who wrote a classic business book called Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don’t.

    In that book, you can find the following sentence: “Greatness is not a function of circumstance. Greatness, it turns out, is largely a matter of conscious choice, and discipline.

    This can be applied to far more than making a business successful.

  •  Nathaniel Pope was born in 1603 in Gloucester, England. 

    In 1630, he married Lucy Anne Fox in England.  They started a family before leaving England and traveling to America.  Before leaving England, Nathaniel and Lucy had four children.  They were Nathaniel, William, Margaret and Elizabeth Pope.

    Nathaniel and his family boarded the ship which departed from England and made the long journey to America. 

  •  FRANKFORT -- The 2015 Session of the Kentucky General Assembly is nearing the halfway point, and with few days left to take up legislation a flurry of key bills passed in the House this past week.

    Among the bills passed in the House include allowing a local option sales tax in Kentucky, combating the growing issue of heroin in our Commonwealth, and proposals to raise the minimum wage and implement a smoking ban across the state.

  •  Many years ago, a very intelligent and well-respected man told us that there was no drug problem in Bullitt County.

    Even 25 years ago, there was a drug problem in the county and in the region.

    Now, there is another problem that many would like to ignore -- homelessness.

    We’re not talking about someone who lost his or her home due to financial problems. We’re talking about people who are literally walking around with no clue where  they might spend t he next night.

  •  FRANKFORT - Kentuckians are being dealt a wintery weather blast and KSP is asking motorists to be aware that weather conditions may change rapidly over the next few days.

    “Winter weather provides new challenges and responsibilities to the public and the Kentucky State Police,” says KSP spokesman Sgt. Michael Webb.

  •  Heavy snow and ice, as well as frozen soil conditions, can damage cherished trees and shrubs in residential landscapes.

    Even areas without major snowfall experience high winds and huge fluctuations in temperatures during winter. But homeowners can lessen the adverse effects of winter weather with preventive maintenance.

    What can happen in winter, and how can you avoid it?

  •  It’s our first week back in this second part of the 2015 session of the Kentucky General Assembly, our shorter annual session held in odd-numbered years.

    I’m glad to be back doing the work of the 49th district.

    Earlier in January, we elected our leadership, established committee assignments, and adopted rules of procedure before returning to our districts to touch base with you and your concerns. 

  •  Erik Butler is saying all the right things and tackling all the right issues.

    Our assumption is that by the time you are reading this, Butler would have officially been hired as the new chief of the Southeast Bullitt Fire Department.

    The board was to meet on Tuesday night with Butler expecting to be named chief.

    Even with the interim tag around his neck, Butler has made some great strides.

  •  FRANKFORT - Although the price of a gallon of gas is lower than at any time in recent memory, not many folks have extra money to burn.

    This is especially true for non-essential things such as fishing reels, shotguns, hunting clothing or fishing waders. Adult commitments such as your mortgage must be paid before any money goes toward a new spinning reel. Obtaining quality hunting and fishing gear inexpensively is a useful skill for outdoors enthusiasts to learn.

  •  See the latest scams and bad business in BBB’s January 2015 Hot Topics

    1.    Beware of tax scams this time of year. One involves fake IRS phone calls that have been circulating across the country. The scammers alter their caller ID to make it look like they are calling from the IRS. They threaten taxpayers with possible arrest or lawsuits if they do not pay immediately – often by pre-paid debit card. The IRS will not call you for payment information. 

  •   The Circuit Court Clerks of Kentucky made 2014 a momentous year in the fight to save lives.  With 998 Kentuckians on the waiting list for an organ transplant, there is no better time to join the Kentucky Organ Donor Registry.  

  •  Today our article is a tribute to one of our members Diana Sue Calvert. She joined the Woman’s Club in 2007 she was a faithful club woman and a great friend to everyone she knew.

  •  You can have the best educational system in the world but if you can’t get kids to and from school, there is no education system.

    For the past couple of years, Bullitt County -- as well as many other districts -- have had a problem recruiting school bus drivers.

    And they have been having trouble retaining those that were employed.

    Recently, the Bullitt County Public School Board voted on a package of incentives which should help those currently employed, as well as those who might consider coming to this district for a job.

  •  Can a report from a state auditor serve the purpose of making both sides happy?

    We guess so.

    Let’s take, for example, the recent release of Adam Edelen’s audit of the Southeast Bullitt Fire Board.

    Going into the request for the examination, the concern was mismanagement of tax dollars.

    Beyond that, local residents were looking for some tidbit of illegal activity. Theft of tax dollars would be an added bonus. Recommendation for jail time for criminal misdeeds would be icing on the cake.

  •  It’s been about three months ago that voters went to the polls and made their selections.

    In the city of Shepherdsville, a mayor and six councilmembers were elected.

    They took office earlier this month and have already had one meeting.

    We hope none in the future follow that initial gathering.

    Meanwhile staff writer Stephen Thomas composed a column that outlines some of the allegations and accusations thrown about at the Jan. 12 meeting.