•  Government watchdogs are celebrating this month the 40th anniversary of the Kentucky Open Records Act. It has withstood the test of time as an indispensable tool for a variety of individuals and interest groups seeking to hold public officials accountable.

  •  Nick Simon left us too soon.

    He left us before everyone had an opportunity to thank him and his company one last time.

    Simon died on Friday. It was a shock to our system.

    Our first task should be to send prayers to his family and to his extended family at Publishers Printing.

    Our next mission should be to say thank you to a man who was generous beyond belief.

    Frank Simon started the tradition of giving to the community when the printing company was moved to Shepherdsville years ago.

  •   In the wake of the largest mass shooting in U.S. history, the BBB Serving Central Florida and the BBB Wise Giving Alliance, the national charity monitoring arm of the Better Business Bureau, caution donors about potential red flags in fund raising to help Orlando victims and their families, and to be aware of the different circumstances that often emerge in tragedy-related philanthropy.

  •  See the latest scams in BBB’s June 2016 Hot Topics

  •  LOUISVILLE - According to the Girl Scout Research Institute’s (GSRI) report, The Power of the Girl Scout Gold Award: Excellence in Leadership and Life, Girl Scout Gold Award recipients receive greater lifetime benefits than their peers with regard to positive sense of self, life satisfaction, leadership, life success, community service, and civic engagement thanks to their experience in Girl Scouting, including earning their Gold Award.

  •  Each year during the first weekend of June, Kentuckiana has an opportunity to support what may be the best community-based fund-raiser in the world.

    The WHAS Crusade for Children is that special time that we can come together to support those with special needs.

    It would be a surprise if every person does not have someone who has had a child receive assistance from Kosair Children’s Hospital, a major benefactor of the Crusade efforts.

  •   It is that time each year that we congratulate another group of young adults who will be taking their next step in life.

    Roughly 900 students will walk the line this weekend as graduation ceremonies are held at Broadbent Arena.

    Never have our young adults been better prepared to take that next step.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE - With summer arriving, concerns have raised over the spread of the Zika virus throughout the country.

  •  As Bullitt County receives over $123 million in road project funding in the next six years, including the $25 million in federal revenue for the new I-65 interchange between Highway 480 and Highway 245, it is time to thank all of those who were involved in the long, hard, and complicated process of obtaining that funding.

    I want to thank my House counterparts, Representatives Russell Webber, James Tipton, and Linda Belcher for their hard work, but there are others who should be equally praised for their dedication.

  •  Maybe it is more symbolic than anything.

    The Shepherdsville City Council recently voted to have an ordinance which prohibits smoking inside a vehicle where there are infants around.

    In reality, the “infant” definition means anyone under the age of 18.

    There were comments pro and con.

    It was mainly the health vs. civil liberties conversation.

    Some did not like the idea of having the right to fine someone for smoking with children in the vehicle.

  •  LOUISVILLE - More than 38 million Americans are expected to travel this Memorial Day weekend, and many will bring their pets along with them. If you’re planning to hit the road with your furry friend, doctors from BluePearl Veterinary Partners are offering tips for keeping your pet safe during the journey.

    One of the most important things to remember is to never leave pets unattended in a car, even with the windows cracked. If it’s 85 degrees outside, the temperature inside a car can rocket to 120 degrees in a matter of minutes.

  •  FRANKFORT -- Retirement may be the farthest thing from your mind when you're still in school, but now is the time to start thinking about it. In fact, the farther away it is, the better off you may be, according to the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA).

    For decades, U.S. citizens have depended on Social Security for much of their retirement income. However, Social Security benefits for younger workers are not guaranteed.

  •  See the latest scams in BBB’s May 2016 Hot Topics


    1.    A local BBB employee received a fake “notice to appear in court” email. The email appears to be from District Court, and informs the recipient to appear in court for a case hearing, then asks the recipient to click on an attachment for more information. Don’t click it! You could end up with a virus on your computer!

  •  It is this week that thousands of people will make Bullitt County their place of lodging as the Kentucky Derby is held a few miles up the road.

    Many make this an annual destination. Others are here for the first time.

    To all, we welcome you to Bullitt County.

    Despite what you might see on the national or regional media and despite what perceptions you might have about the county, there is a lot more great things happening if you peel the onion.

  •  We succeeded last week in passing a two-year, $21.5 billion biennial budget for the Commonwealth that restores funding for some of our most effective programs in K-12 education, and lessens the blow of deep cuts the governor proposed for our public colleges and universities.

  •  BBB is warning Prince fans to beware of scams that could pop up, surrounding his death. Yesterday, news broke that Prince Rogers Nelson was found dead in his home in Minneapolis at the age of 57.

    Scammers use celebrity deaths to con fans in a variety of ways. Whatever the scam may be, fans will end up with viruses or malware on their computers, or giving out personal information.

  •  Once you get into the legal arena, seldom are things completed quickly. There are rules that must be followed and due process to both parties that must be guaranteed.

    We are pleased that the discourse over the selection of the mayor in Shepherdsville has moved from whether there can be a meeting due to a lack of a quorum to being able to handle the business at hand.

    We commend attorney Mark Edison for coming up with a solution to allow his clients -- councilmembers Larry Hatfield and Bernie Brown -- to attend meetings and make sure there is a quorum.

  •  The U.S. Marshals Service has received several phone calls from residents who have received phone calls from a person stating they are a U.S. Marshal and threating arrest if a “fine” is not paid.

    If you have received a phone call from a person saying they are a federal law enforcement officer, sheriff or an attorney for the government and they have an arrest warrant for you if a fine is not paid. It’s a scam.

  •  FRANKFORT -- A new day is dawning in Kentucky.

    For the first time in many years, the winds of financial responsibility have begun to blow briskly through the marble halls of Frankfort. These welcome breezes are ushering in the promise of a fresh start for the Commonwealth. 

  •  Over the past ten years, despite the economic downturn, Bullitt County Public Schools created nearly $4 million in new education funds –– without raising taxes.   

    In the 2005-06 school year, BCPS decided to make aggressive improvements in our energy use. LED lighting, the building automation system, and heat-absorbing window films not only improve student’s alertness and ability to learn but also have a huge impact on our budget’s bottom line. 

    In fact, we cut our energy cost per square foot nearly in HALF.