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Opinion

  •  Most readers will know that to say “potential energy” is another way of saying “stored” energy, like when you turn the propeller on the balsa wood rubber band powered plane until it is so twisted it is getting ready to break. 

    To turn it into kinetic energy, one just has to let go and away the plane soars.

    During the last couple of weeks, I had my yearly opportunity to speak to our 8th grade class at all six middle schools. 

    That adds up to just over a thousand 13- or 14-year-old young men and women. 

  •  Maybe it was the sweet smell of bacon. Maybe it was the desire to stop writing big checks to attorneys. Maybe the parties finally realized that enough was enough.

    For whatever reason, the fire district board and the fire department board at Southeast Bullitt have been working together to reach an agreement for an amended contract.

    Over breakfast Saturday, the parties calmly and intelligently discussed a skeleton of a contract agreement.

    Only one real sticking point appeared -- the length of the contract.

  •  FRANKFORT — The General Assembly returned to Frankfort this week after a brief organizational break, and the week has been filled with legislative meetings as well as the daily session. 

    Most importantly, when we returned we heard from Gov. Matt Bevin as he delivered the State of the Commonwealth to a joint session of the House and Senate. 

    Some major items that Governor Bevin touched on in his address were the need for tax and pension reform. 

  •  FRANKFORT -- The hallways were packed with Kentuckians from across the state making their voices heard as we began the second part of the 2017 Legislative Session in Frankfort. 

    I was especially heartened at the passionate crowd for the Rally for Life on Wednesday, February 8, and later in the evening that energy and excitement continued during Governor Bevin’s State of the Commonwealth Address.

    Hundreds of people filled the Capitol to celebrate the sanctity of life alongside Bevin and members of the General Assembly.

  •  Here’s a new edition that will run occasionally in The Pioneer News.

    The Suggestion Box will be open to the public to give ideas. But we don’t want suggestions that my neighbor has a junk car next door. The suggestions are to be what are some ideas to help the entire community.

    We will pass those suggestions on to the proper agencies and try to do a little tracking on whether anything is done. Once again, these are to help benefit the community, in general.

    Send your suggestions to: editor@pioneernews.net

  •   Watch out local officials. Discussions in Frankfort seem to be in favor of taking over city government in Louisville.

    The talk is to limit the numbers of terms a candidate can serve as mayor. That would be two.

    Also, the talk is that if there is a vacancy for mayor, the governor would have the ability to fill that position.

    The governor has always had the power to replace county officials. Now, it is getting a little deeper into the cities.

  •  SHEPHERDSVILLE – Today is another edition of an occasional column that I’ve called OLD BUSINESS.

    Why?

    Because we seem to forget as elected officials things what we’ve talked about. In other words, I’ll keep certain topics on the list until something is done.

    In the inaugural list, what about:

    *The Bullitt County Sanitation District is made up of three board members appointed by fiscal court.

  •  See the latest scams in BBB’s February 2017 Hot Topics

     

  •  There’s just something missing at times when our governmental leaders do decide to make a decision.

    Let us take a few recent decisions by Bullitt Fiscal Court. 

    Not to constantly hammer on the court -- because we’re not sure they pay too much attention -- but we need to step back for just a moment.

    The planning administrator position has been open for months.

    Roanne Hammond has come out of retirement to fill the vacancy. She is an excellent person and will do a good job, as she did previously.

  •   The “can you hear me now?” scam has previously targeted businesses, but a new twist is now targeting consumers. Better Business Bureaus nationwide are receiving BBB Scam Tracker reports about this latest scam.

  •  William Thomas Lee’s parents were Orleans Lee and Mary Cundiff.  William’s father Orleans was born in 1826 in Belmont, Bullitt County, Kentucky. 

    He grew up in Bullitt County and married Mary Cundiff in 1826.  Mary Cundiff was born in 1828 in Bullitt County, Kentucky. 

    She was the daughter of John Brown Cundiff and Elizabeth Younger. 

    They had 10 children.  They were Amanda, John Henry, Mary Allis, Alice, Charles, William, Sarah, Orleans, Emma and Mary Lee.

  •  Submitted by Mindy Eaton, Director of Communication & Marketing, BBB

  •  Another year has come and gone.  They say time flies when you are having fun!  I don’t know about having fun but the clerks certainly have been busy this past year.

    The state continues to make changes to its computerized accounts receivable program.  

    Unfortunately, we are still required to run both the manual and computerized accounts receivable programs because the computerized program is still not capable of generating all of the needed reports. 

  •  FRANKFORT — For the first time since 1921, Republicans took control of the Kentucky House of Representatives, making our first week back to Frankfort a historic one. 

    We have been hard at work doing exactly what the voters of Kentucky sent us to Frankfort to accomplish. 

    The result of this was an extremely productive first week of the 2017 session, in which priority bills to improve the economy, protect life, and make government more accountable passed through the General Assembly. 

  •  This is my last newspaper report as your state representative for district 49. 

    A summary of my December committee meetings follows.

    1.  LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMMITTEE. 

    KACO gave their report for 2017 County Legislative issues. The issue that will affect Bullitt County the most (if passed) is changing the road formula. Another concern raised involves a strain on our jails.

    2. TASK FORCE FOR PREVENTING CHILD ABUSE AND EXPLOITATION.(Which I chaired). 

  •  Whether the bills approved on Saturday in Frankfort were good or bad, they sure happened fast.

    Kind of like showing you that you can do something and there isn’t anything you can do about it.

    But, with the majority, couldn’t you take your time and still get the same result in a few weeks?

    Maybe the folks on the other side of the aisle did the same thing for 100 years. Maybe we just didn’t know the speed in which very important pieces of legislation was passed.

  •  Bullitt County is a caring community.

    Look past the negative. This community will always rise to the top when the need is there.

    During the past month, you’ve seen numerous stories and pictures about the generosity of this community. Young and old, the community has come forward to provide some of our less fortunate a brighter Christmas celebration.

    None of the donors are seeking praise or recognition. They are doing it because they want to.

  •  In all practicality, there is never a time when there isn’t an election looming for somebody.

    But, for 2017, there will be no elections on the ballot in Bullitt County -- or Kentucky, for that matter.

    Why is that important?

    It should give elected officials at least a few months before they start worrying about how their decisions will affect their next test from the voters.

    Ok, so what does that mean to us, the people?

  •  See the latest scams in BBB’s January 2017 Hot Topics

    1. A local consumer reported almost falling victim to a Craigslist scam involving a “too good to be true” deal on a car for sale. The scammer said she was in the military and needed to sell the vehicle quickly because she was being deployed. She requested payment with gift cards through the fake “Amazon Payment” program.

  •  Mary Elizabeth Trunnell was born in 1849 in Bullitt County, Kentucky. 

    She was the daughter of Henry Trunnell and Mary Jane Field Bowman.  Her father Henry Trunnell was born in 1817 in Montgomery County, Maryland.  He married in 1838 to his first wife Louisa Grable.  

    They had a son who was Phillip G. Trunnell.  Louisa divorced Henry in 1848 and remarried her neighbor leaving their son to be raised by their father.

    Henry remarried in November 1848, to Mary Jane Field Bowman.