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Opinion

  • FRANKFORT - For many, Thanksgiving means a home-cooked feast with family and friends. In light of this holiday tradition, the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH) reminds Kentuckians that food safety should also be a part of the celebration.

    Many holiday dinners incorporate meat and poultry, a possible source of foodborne disease unless handled and prepared properly. This holiday season, DPH urges consumers to take precautions in preparing food items and to pay close attention to good hygiene practices.

  • It’s been 10 years since the kidnapping and murder of 17-year-old Jessica Dishon.

    After the initial suspect, David “Bucky” Brooks, was indicted but the proceedings ended in a mistrial, there has been no other charges.

    There were hundreds of theories in back in 1999 with just as many suspects named. Yet, to date, another trial has not been held.

    After the media circus which surrounded the case 10 years ago and the ensuing trial, things have been quiet.

  • The issue is the same - should a community allow alcohol sales on a limited basis on Sundays.

    The reaction has been quite different.

    The Shepherdsville City Council has floated the trial balloon on two occasions within the past couple of years. Both times it was shot down.

    Now, the city officials have agreed to have some type of mock election for residents in the community. Details are still being worked out.

    The problem is that no one on the council is bound by the outcome of the vote.

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - Without asking any of them, I know the answer.

    The most difficult thing school boards in Bullitt County will have to vote upon is redistricting plans.

    In some districts, the tough decision is what to do when enrollment stagnates or declines and you have to make personnel cuts.

    In Bullitt County, that is not a problem.

    Even when building has slowed to a crawl, the district welcomes over 300 more students this year.

  • If it was the fourth quarter of a football game and the outcome was decided, they might say that the verbal sparring being done by officials in Mount Washington is a bit chippy.

    It seems that the issue could be the weather and things have gotten a bit edgy.

    Forget who is at fault, the voters of Mount Washington didn’t put officials in office to jab at one another.

    We’ve seen that when fiscal court works as a team, things get done.

    In Mount Washington, the same must happen.

  • There are two sides to every coin.

    When it comes to assessment results, there is both good news and bad news.

    We are not a school district that is afraid to confront the brutal facts and I will outline some of them below.  But, the news from our assessment results is mostly good news and we need to acknowledge and celebrate that fact.

    I hear from fellow superintendents all over the state that their goal is to be a top 10 ranked school district.

  • I often hear diametrically opposed statements about Kentucky’s schools:

    One, they’re a lost cause.

    Or two, they were “fixed” in 1990 by the Kentucky Education Reform Act, and they need no further attention.

    Neither conclusion is true.

    Now, KERA was a revolutionary event.

  • Over a two-stint period, Elaine Wilson served Bullitt County for 20 years as its director of tourism.

    The agency has gone from operating out of a small office to now overseeing a major conference center in the region.

    Bullitt County is blessed to have five interchange exits on Interstate 65, one of the busiest roads in the nation.

    But tourists don’t just decide to stop on their way to another destination.

  • If there are still any BRAC doubters out there, you should have seen the turn out for the Fort Knox Job Information Sessions at the Urban League Economic Empowerment Tour and Career Fair in Louisville last month.

    We had hundreds of folks show up to learn more about the employment opportunities coming to the installation. Believe me, most were plenty interested in finding out how to qualify and apply for these future positions.

  • Motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults in the U.S.

    Here in Kentucky, statistics from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet show that drivers between the ages of 15 and 20 were involved in more than 26,000 collisions in 2008, resulting in 141 fatalities. Seventy-percent of those killed were teenagers.

    According to the National Transportation Safety Board, 16-year-old drivers are more than twice as likely to be involved in fatal crashes as older drivers.

  • While all the numbers are still being assembled, it appears the school district leadership is pretty pleased with the strides made in the latest round of testing.

    While the CATS test has been put to rest, the federal No Child Left Behind remains.

    The district made a great stride when students with disabilities tested at a level where they were shy of the goal but made significant progress to be granted Safe Harbor.

    Few districts can claim to reach this level.

    But the district has too many schools which are not reaching their individual targets.

  • When Kentucky’s college basketball coaches are mired in a down year and look to build their teams for the future, they go to the proverbial ends of the earth to find prospects.

    Knowing that competition for new players is fierce, they act aggressively to sell their program and their team ee" often concentrating on areas where previous recruiting successes have built relationships with local coaches and scouts.

    State officials must employ a similar strategy in preparing Kentucky’s economy and its work force for growth and success.

  • The Better Business Bureau is warning consumers about two companies that claim to be Louisville-based businesses, but they are actually scams. Consumers across the country are contacting the BBB of Louisville, Southern Indiana, and Western Kentucky to inquire about these “companies.” 

     

    JC Henning

    BBB has received over 100 inquiries on JC Henning, Inc from across the country. These scammers prey on the unemployed. They have a professional looking website at www.jchenninginc.com that features a photo of the corporate

  • Alcoholism and other addictions are treatable diseases, and when they are properly treated, those affected can lead productive, healthy lives.

    Years of scientific research and science-based treatment shows that addiction is a medical condition that should be treated like any other chronic illness.

    The 2008 expansion of the Mental Health Parity Act of 1996, which requires equal treatment for insurance coverage of mental health and addiction disorders to that for physical ailments, shows that the majority of our elected officials understand this.

  • If you enjoy working with young people, volunteering as a 4-H club leader may be an exciting and fulfilling experience for you.

    In 4-H, caring, enthusiastic adults are always needed to assist young people in achieving their goals.

    Club leaders can positively impact a 4-H’ers life. It is very rewarding for them to watch young people build self-confidence and self-worth and develop new interests as they accomplish goals in various projects and activities.

    Club leaders can either organize a community club or a project club.

  • Tougher than probation. More rewarding than prison.

    Bullitt County joined the vast majority of counties in Kentucky to offer drug court programs for non-violent felony offenders.

    The program has been a wonderful success.

    Has everyone placed in the program remained drug-free? No. A number of them will appear before Circuit Judge Rodney Burress trying to explain why they didn’t conform to the strict set of rules placed on them by the drug court.