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Opinion

  • Alcoholism and other addictions are treatable diseases, and when they are properly treated, those affected can lead productive, healthy lives.

    Years of scientific research and science-based treatment shows that addiction is a medical condition that should be treated like any other chronic illness.

    The 2008 expansion of the Mental Health Parity Act of 1996, which requires equal treatment for insurance coverage of mental health and addiction disorders to that for physical ailments, shows that the majority of our elected officials understand this.

  • If you enjoy working with young people, volunteering as a 4-H club leader may be an exciting and fulfilling experience for you.

    In 4-H, caring, enthusiastic adults are always needed to assist young people in achieving their goals.

    Club leaders can positively impact a 4-H’ers life. It is very rewarding for them to watch young people build self-confidence and self-worth and develop new interests as they accomplish goals in various projects and activities.

    Club leaders can either organize a community club or a project club.

  • Tougher than probation. More rewarding than prison.

    Bullitt County joined the vast majority of counties in Kentucky to offer drug court programs for non-violent felony offenders.

    The program has been a wonderful success.

    Has everyone placed in the program remained drug-free? No. A number of them will appear before Circuit Judge Rodney Burress trying to explain why they didn’t conform to the strict set of rules placed on them by the drug court.

  • Today, candy is the central focus of the spookiest holiday of the year.  In fact, the average American consumes 24 pounds of candy in a year, most of which is eaten right after Halloween according to the U.S. Census Bureau.   But for children with diabetes, it can be difficult to enjoy the festivities when all their fellow goblins are in a frenzy to get their hands on mounds of sweet treats.

     

  • OCTOBER 2009

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    MONTH:

    Adopt-A-Shelter Dog

    Animal Safety and Protection

    Antidepressant Death Awareness

    Bake and Decorate

    Breast Cancer Awareness

    Celebrating the Bilingual Child

    Celiac Disease Awareness

    Children's Magazine

    Chili

    Chiropractic

    Church Library

    Church Safety and Security

    Class Reunion

    Co-op Awareness

    Crime Prevention

    Cyber Safety Awareness

    Dental Hygiene

  • It is hard to believe that summer break is over.  The neighborhoods are now mostly quiet with children tucked away in their classrooms ready to learn.

    Teachers have a new group of students to motivate and inspire.  Amid all the academics that are covered in the schools, many other lessons are learned as well - some good, some bad. 

    Life lessons - you know them well.  Those things that shape who you are and some that even change your path forever. 

  • In my travels across Kentucky this August, I met with many doctors, nurses, seniors, hospital workers, small-business owners, and countless others concerned about their health care and what kinds of reforms government can make.

    Everybody had an opinion.

    No one claimed the current system is perfect.

    But I didn’t meet anybody who thought a government takeover of health care was the answer.

    No, what Kentuckians told me loud and clear was that those of us in Washington should take the time necessary to get health care reform right.

  • For years, we have advocated more planning than zoning. However, when reality sets in, the opposite is true.

    Maybe heeding some of our advice or maybe thinking outside of the normal governmental box, Bullitt County Judge/Executive Melanie Roberts wants to hire a planner.

    Great idea. Wish we had thought of it 20 years ago.

    The problem is -- and always has been -- money. To hire someone with a degree will take more than the $39,000 set aside in the annual budget.

    Maybe the economy would make filling the position more possible. We don’t know.

  • If anyone questions where you live and why you live there, just point out that Bullitt County is a great community made up of caring people.

    On Aug. 20 an unnamed city employee in Shepherdsville decided that a monument was needed to honor the veterans of military services.

    Absorbing the entire cost, the anonymous employee took care of everything and the monument was officially dedicated.

    Every community is full of caring people. And when the chips are down, you know others will come to offer help.

  • Maybe it is the fact that my son is just weeks away from getting his driver’s license.

    Or maybe it is from writing too many stories detailing death coming much too early for too many youths in our community.

    The old belief that the young is indestructible is nothing but a myth.

    Just ask the families of Preston Cissell, Jason Smith and R.D. Reynolds.

    The community lost each of these young men in the recent couple of months. They were lost in different ways but they were all lost much too early in their lives.

  • When legislators return to Frankfort in January, they will face many issues, including the budget crisis, gaming and duels.

    Yes, duels have been part of the Constitutional oath since 1849.

    State Rep. Darryl Owens of Louisville has pre-filed a bill to eliminate the part of the oath of elected officials stating that they had dueled or been a second in a duel.

  • I am 82 years old, and my wife (80) and I are retired in Palm Desert, Calif.

    Born in Belmont I spent the first 16 years of my life there. We are attending the Belmont Baptist Church for the first time in 66 years, and it calls for a bit of nostalgia and reminiscing about life during and after Belmont.

    Regular attendance at Sunday School and Church each Sunday was expected.  My father was the Sunday School Superintendent, and  my mother was the teacher of a Sunday School Class of small children.

  • When arriving into the community over 25 years ago, Bullitt County was home of four major festivals each year.

    The Mount Washington Historical Society had the spring festival each May and Lebanon Junction’s Old Fashion Days were held in early October.

    The Bullitt County Fair was held in the middle of June at the fairgrounds.

    And the Shepherdsville Olde Tyme Homecoming was held along Frank E. Simon Avenue.

  • The beginning of each new school year your child begins another part of their amazing journey from the first day of kindergarten to high school graduation.

    One of the most essential elements for a student’s success is good attendance.

    Attendance is important and must be taken seriously for kindergarten students, elementary, middle and high school students.

    Students need to be at school each day in order to be properly prepared for the important next steps in learning.

  • Seldom does anything generate the controversy caused when school boundary lines are altered.

    With continued growth and the construction of a new elementary school in Mount Washington, the dreaded need to redistrict schools has been done.

    Though not etched in stone, the committee set forth some changes that won’t be altered by a simple plea from the public.

    On Tuesday, Aug. 18, a public hearing will be held at the central office. This will be a time when your voice can be heard.