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Opinion

  • FRANKFORT ee" To better understand just how much the country’s economic crisis has affected Kentucky, it may help to look at some hard-to-imagine statistics in a different way.

    If the number of people seeking unemployment insurance for the first time in February came together, for example, they would immediately become Kentucky’s third-largest city, slightly ahead of Owensboro.

    The total number of unemployed is of course much higher. Its size easily outranks the combined populations of Owensboro, Bowling Green, Covington and Richmond.

  • Probably 99.9 percent of the Bullitt County populace would not know how to make methamphetamine or even what it looks like if they saw it.

    However, it is a problem throughout the country and Bullitt County is not immune.

    A special series of articles the past week in The Pioneer News and a public forum held on Tuesday night provide proof of the problem.

    It affects many of us – even though we might not know it. Most crimes occur due to drug involvement and many families are falling apart because of the drug.

  • A rally cry for both young and old in Bullitt County has been the annual Relay for Life to benefit the American Cancer Society.

    While Bullitt County has its way to fighting at times against one another, it has a way to also pull together at times of need.

    There is no bigger need than finding a cure for cancer. Every family in Bullitt County has been touched by the dreaded disease in some way or another.

    Once a year, the community comes together to raise over $200,000 for cancer research.

  • For months, it was like a big secret as no official would talk about it.

    The city of Shepherdsville was going to run a sewer line south to Highway 245 and it would expand its sewer plant.

    We have now learned the point of destination is indeed Highway 245 and a major, major player is Jim Beam Distillery.

    The combined project is looking to run around $20 million. The city can’t make the numbers work to make the sewer line expansion and plant expansion possible.

    This has been going on for well over a year.

  • Bullitt Countians prayed more than usual during Holy Week when news was leaked about the firing of the local Easter Bunny.

    Clyde “Dizzy” Cottontail and his assistant bunnies were fired following their last egg hunt, just weeks prior to Easter, by Bullitt Fiscal Court. The decision was a result of two consecutive lackluster egg hunt seasons in the minds of county magistrates and many rabbit fans.

  • Two steps forward. One step back. Perhaps that’s the best way to characterize the impact of the recently concluded legislative session on Kentucky’s prospects for progress.

    Clearly there was substantial progress made in key areas, but we fell short on some important matters.

    First step forward

  • For the past 18 years, educators in Kentucky have had their feet held to the proverbial fire.

    As the years have passed, the fire got a little hotter.

    By the year 2014, school districts in Kentucky had a goal of 100 percent proficiency for their students in the Commonwealth Accountability Testing System.

    As of 2008, no Bullitt County school had reached the magic mark across the board. Few in Kentucky had met their goal with just six more years to go.

  • Just when you thought there would be no more discussion on the possibility of alcohol sales on Sunday, it resurfaced Monday night.

    Councilman Scott Ellis threw out an interesting proposal - have a vote of the people that really doesn’t have any legal standing.

    After businessman Alex Ramirez spoke to the Shepherdsville City Council about how he has learned the affects of not having Sunday alcohol sales, Ellis said there might be an option.

  • FRANKFORT ee" Anticlimactic it may have been, since the largest and stickiest issues on the table had been well disposed of earlier. But the scheduled final two days of this year’s legislative session did convene in Frankfort Thursday with a bit of uncertainty hanging over it ee" and some drama at the end.

    The question going in: Would the House take up any of the bills that were still pending between chambers when the Legislature adjourned two weeks ago for its veto recess?

  • Showing up early for Mount Washington’s public hearing on the proposed sewer plant upgrade and water/sewer rate hikes was really a waste of my time.

    I thought I would need to get there well ahead of the 7 p.m. start time to get a good seat and settle in for a long evening of reporting on questions, answers and testimony from concerned citizens.

    But much to my surprise — and to the surprise of many Mount Washington public officials — I didn’t need to get there early.

  • Hello, Bullitt Countians! I'm Steve Thomas.

    As a former radio employee and a member of the media, the news of Paul Harvey's passing rang loud and clear in my mind, just as his voice did.

    Harvey did the absolute best news show in history, including his famous "The Rest of the Story" segments.

    In his honor, I tried to put together a story similar to one of Harvey's. It's not very easy, though.

    Rather, I'll discuss something that I now realize just might be the most important aspect of Harvey's career: Integrity.

  • We all know that tobacco use leads to health issues like heart disease, cancer, premature aging, and lung diseases.

    But, did you know that studies are showing tobacco use is linked to chronic conditions such as arthritis, inflammation of a joint that can lead to permanent damage, and osteoporosis, a condition in which bones weaken due to calcium loss?

  • This summer, 20 young people from Japan along with two adult chaperones will come to Kentucky to learn about American families and culture. A great way for you and your child to take part in this international experience is by becoming a host family for one of these students. Applications are now being accepted.

    Not only do 4-H host families get to enjoy helping the Japanese 4-H learn about American families and culture, but they also learn about Japanese culture, customs and history. Many times, international bonds that last a lifetime are created.