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Opinion

  • Showing up early for Mount Washington’s public hearing on the proposed sewer plant upgrade and water/sewer rate hikes was really a waste of my time.

    I thought I would need to get there well ahead of the 7 p.m. start time to get a good seat and settle in for a long evening of reporting on questions, answers and testimony from concerned citizens.

    But much to my surprise — and to the surprise of many Mount Washington public officials — I didn’t need to get there early.

  • Hello, Bullitt Countians! I'm Steve Thomas.

    As a former radio employee and a member of the media, the news of Paul Harvey's passing rang loud and clear in my mind, just as his voice did.

    Harvey did the absolute best news show in history, including his famous "The Rest of the Story" segments.

    In his honor, I tried to put together a story similar to one of Harvey's. It's not very easy, though.

    Rather, I'll discuss something that I now realize just might be the most important aspect of Harvey's career: Integrity.

  • We all know that tobacco use leads to health issues like heart disease, cancer, premature aging, and lung diseases.

    But, did you know that studies are showing tobacco use is linked to chronic conditions such as arthritis, inflammation of a joint that can lead to permanent damage, and osteoporosis, a condition in which bones weaken due to calcium loss?

  • This summer, 20 young people from Japan along with two adult chaperones will come to Kentucky to learn about American families and culture. A great way for you and your child to take part in this international experience is by becoming a host family for one of these students. Applications are now being accepted.

    Not only do 4-H host families get to enjoy helping the Japanese 4-H learn about American families and culture, but they also learn about Japanese culture, customs and history. Many times, international bonds that last a lifetime are created.

  • FRANKFORT — As we hit the home stretch of this 30-day legislative session this week, we directed our attention to a range of bills that will make a difference in the lives of average Kentuckians.

    This is our last opportunity to focus on Senate bills, as next week, each chamber will turn its attention to final passage of legislation already passed by the other, so the Governor can sign or veto the bills during our two-week recess later in March.

  • When you don’t drink and don’t smoke, you need some type of vice other than working too much.

    From the time I can remember, one of my escapes in life has been the human soap opera with athletes - more commonly known as professional wrestling.

    Make no mistake about it, don’t think I would have even gotten into the squared circle or the six sided-ring.

  • Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency, Inc. has begun the “Crisis” portion of the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) that assists households in a heating crisis on January 5, 2009.

    The deepening of cold weather combined with rising costs leaves many households unable to fully meet heating bills of purchase sufficient bulk fuel to keep their families safe and warm. Your local Community Action Partnership (CAP) stands ready to help!

  • If you’re into Civics, you’ll love today’s column.  I’ll explain why your General Assembly is in recess right now at a time we call the “Veto Period” and close out the last of this session’s Saturday Coffees.

  • A recent federal report entitled, “Underage Alcohol Use: Where Do Young People Drink?” sheds some revealing light on this question and the answers that many parents, other concerned caretakers and inquiring minds want to know.

    The 2006 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) asked young people ages 12 to 20 who had used alcohol in the past month two questions: how did they get it and where did they drink it?

  • The only surprise in discussions to study the Shepherdsville civil service ordinance is that it has taken this long.

    There are no guarantees that any changes will be made. And the discussion will be good.

    When it was approved several years ago, there was no public outcry. And several stories were written about it.

    There was really no outcry until election time arose.

    The city’s version protects every employee from discipline or dismissal. If done, the employee can ask for a hearing before the civil service board.

  • FRANKFORT ee" Although final details are still pending, Kentucky got a much clearer picture last week of what it can expect from the federal stimulus package that Congress recently passed. Even with quite a few strings attached, it should still provide a substantial lift right when we need it most.

    According to Gov. Beshear, we will get a little more than $3 billion over the next 28 months, which doesn’t include direct stimulus payments Kentuckians may receive from such things as tax cuts or boosts in Social Security payments.

  • Welcome to life on the Shepherdsville City Council. And, by the way, in your first six weeks in office, you have a multi-million dollar project to decide upon.

    And, worse than that, the decision is worth a whole lot more than simply an expansion and upgrade of your sewer infrastructure.

    For nearly a year, Shepherdsville officials have been talking with various entities.

    Jim Beam Distillery in Clermont has its own package sewer treatment plant. Under the proposal, the company would give up its plant and hook up to the city’s expanded system.