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Opinion

  • Spring is here and again our Governor, County Judge Executives and Mayors across Kentucky have proclaimed May as Motorcycle Awareness Month.

    The majority of motorcycle fatalities and injuries are caused by a motorist violating the right of way of a motorcycle.

    That means that you cross the center line in front of them, you pull out in front of them or you make a lethal left hand turn in front of them.

  • Asthma is a chronic breathing disorder and is the most common chronic health problem among children.

    Children with asthma have attacks of coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath, which may be very serious.

    These symptoms are caused by spasms of the air passages in the lungs.

    The air passages swell, become inflamed, and fill with mucus, making breathing difficult. Many asthma attacks occur when children get respiratory infections, including infections caused by common cold viruses. Attacks can also be caused by:

    * Exposure to cigarette smoke,

  • You learn to relish the good days and try to overlook the bad ones.

    For leaders in Bullitt County, last Thursday ranks as a pretty good day.

    Gov. Steve Beshear was in town last week to first cut the ribbon on Sabert Corp. in Hillview and bring confirmation that Shepherdsville would receive $3 million for its sewer expansion and line extension program.

    The opening last June of the Sabert plant off East Blue Lick Road was not a smooth one. Litigation remains over the rezoning, annexation and sale of the property.

  • At 24 years old, people still tell me that I have my whole life ahead of me. But is that really true, or is it just a clich that people use to help one another feel like they’ve always got more time when, in fact, the next breath is not promised to us?

    A bit depressing, I know. But it is true. Thousands of people in the United States die each week much younger than I. If you don’t believe me, check out our local obituary pages for a few consecutive weeks and see those connected with Bullitt County communities that die at what most would consider a young age.

  • We’re approaching that time of year where our finest students dress in goofy clothes and parade across a stage to receive a piece of paper that changes their lives.

    Bullitt County high schools will soon graduate, not to mention local college students, eighth graders and pre-schoolers.

    High school graduation is the big one; it’s the most common passage of life many will experience.

    For some it might be the most important moment of their younger lives.

  • Believe it or not, I can feel the pain about to be felt by members of Bullitt Fiscal Court.

    Government should be run like a business. So, when the economy takes a tumble, so do government agencies.

    As a publisher, I get to tackle my budget each fall. Like government leaders, you look at trends for the past 9-10 months. You look at revenue and expenditures.

    You make your best guess. And neither budget can run in the red.

    For me, running in the red could lead to a new job.

  • JUNE 2009

    MONTH:

    Accordion Awareness

    Adopt-A-Shelter-Cat

    American Rivers

    Aphasia Awareness

    Bathroom Reading

    Cancer from the Sun

    Candy

    Celibacy Awareness

    Child Vision Awareness

    Childhood Cancer Campaign

    Children’s Awareness

    Dairy

    Dairy Alternatives

    Effective Communications

    Entreprenuers “Do It Yourself” Marketing

    Fireworks Safety (June and July)

    Gay and Lesbian Pride

    GLBT Book

    Go Barefoot

  • It won’t be a total disaster. Attendance will probably not be as bad as local officials fear.

    But the state Department of Education’s decision to change an initial decision reached last May is a slap in the face to local board members.

    By virtue of an April 24 decision, Bullitt County public school students will be in the classrooms on June 3. This is one more day than the amended calendar called for after wind and ice storms.

    Faced with possibly losing $400,000 in state funding, school officials had to agree.

  • As health experts across the world seek to get more information and a better understanding of the scope and severity of the swine flu outbreak, this is a good time for families, businesses, and organizations to review and update their preparedness plans.

    One of the key components of any plan is the use of techniques to avoid becoming infected.

  • The problem is much more serious than we ever imagined.

    When one thinks of drowning incidents, seldom do we think about deaths being caused by people literally being trapped under water by infiltration pumps.

    However, it has happened on numerous occasions.

    Now, sit appears that some, if not all, of the four county swimming pools may not open this summer.

  • Inclement weather has made for sloppy conditions this year at Mike Farner Downs in the annual Bullitt County Derby.

    A strong field this season is led by the favorite, Road Pavey, an entry sponsored by Bullitt Fiscal Court and County Judge/Executive Melanie Roberts.

    “He has a strong track record, plus he’s hard to catch,” Roberts said.

  • This week staff artist Paul Coyle takes a look at rising gas prices.

  • Sometimes things are said at local governmental meetings that are so profound that they need a mention -- somewhere in the paper.

    Often, those thoughts get lost in our memory banks or in the pages of our notebooks.

    I’ll spit a couple of recent items that make you want to ponder...

    Recently, Bullitt County was given state approval to do what many private citizens have been doing -- burning storm debris.

    The county has accumulated a massive pile of debris at the Bullitt County Stockyards.

  • Congratulations to the city of Shepherdsville. And congratulations to the people of Bullitt County.

    For the past couple of years, many meetings have been held between officials with the city and Jim Beam Brands.

    The city was looking for a partner to help expand its sewer treatment plant and the international distiller wanted to take its package treatment plant off-line.

    After some ticklish moments when the multi-million project appeared dead, the partnership appears to be back together and moving forward.