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Opinion

  • The elections are over and we know the playing field in January.

    Whether it is in the White House or in the city hall chambers, there are tough times that must be addressed by all.

    The country has taken an historic step in the election of Barack Obama. We must rally behind the new president and we must demand that steps are taken to return the country to its economic standing.

    We must look at our local leaders -- many of whom will be taking office for the first time. There will a mix of the old and new. It will take leadership to bring the sides together.

  • Let me first say that it has been heartening to see communities across Kentucky pull together to help those in need following the devastating windstorm that swept across our state on September 14. 

    Families were put to the test with damaged homes, loss of power and in some cases, the loss of life.

    As Kentuckians so often do when faced with adversity, we responded with kindness, compassion and concern for our neighbors.

  • Total fractures were over 2 million, costing nearly $17 billion in 2005, according to a study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

    Osteoporosis is more than a disease that affects the elderly.

    Why?

    The population is aging, this means more and more people are reaching the high-risk age for osteoporosis-age 50.

    It also means the burden of the cost is falling on fewer and fewer workers.

    It is not just hip fractures either.

  • No matter your political persuasion, the visit on Monday by First Lady Laura Bush was wonderful.

    Seldom does Shepherdsville and Bullitt County have an opportunity to shine on something that is positive.

    Yes, Monday’s appearance was a political stump for the Republican Party. There is no doubt of that.

    But it was also a historic opportunity for Bullitt County.

    Many in the crowd of 1,000 weren’t members of the Republican Party. Some were there to support the party; others were there to see the First Lady.

  • Smile Kentucky! addresses what the U.S. Surgeon General calls the most common chronic childhood disease in this country, tooth decay.

    The program, created in 2002, is a community partnership to improve the oral health of children. Since its beginning, Smile Kentucky! has provided dental education programs to 75,000 children, dental screening to over 21,000, and free treatment to over 1,300 children. The program works with elementary schools in Louisville Metro, Bullitt County, Spencer, Henry, Nelson, and Oldham.

  • By the time this hits the presses, the elections of 2008 will be concluded.

    At least, that is the hope.

    Sitting here nursing a bad back and trying to watch a few TV programs between the commercials, it gives reason for some non-partisan pause and reflection.

    Can it be true that there will be no elections in Kentucky in 2009? What will we do?

    Isn’t it great to see all the negative advertising you see in the media? And the candidates have to make some silly comment that they endorse the message.

  • On Tuesday, it will be that time of the year when your right to have a say in how government operates occurs.

    Voters across the nation will have an opportunity that may in the world do not have -- a chance to select your leaders without any undue pressures or threats.

    During a presidential election, many more people will make a trip to the voting booth not only to select the country’s leader for the next four years but also to pick our local leaders.

  • Election Day is coming!  With a record number of voters expected to arrive at the polls on Election Day, voter preparation is the key to a smooth voting experience. 

    Please have your candidate selection decisions made before you get to the machine.

    Sample ballots will be available at the polls and a copy will be printed in the local paper.

  • OCTOBER

    MONTH:

    Adopt-A-Shelter-Dog

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - Bullitt County became the host of a newly founded radical holiday group eager to alter the status of all major holidays.

    A gathering of officials and figureheads at Paroquet Springs Conference Centre determined that the annual holiday calendar should change.

    The main figurehead for the event was Jack O’Lantern, Irish representative of the Scary Creatures and Really Evil Ancient Monsters (SCREAM) organization.

  • Artist Paul Coyle take's a look at the current economic crisis and its effect on banks.

  •    To many people, the word politician is a nasty name.

       

    Maybe a four-letter word for some.

    Over the past week, there was the unfortunate need to talk to people to get their reactions to Larry Belcher.

    Belcher died in an auto accident Monday evening doing what he does best -- helping people.

    Most of you will recognize Larry as the state representative for the people of the 49th District.

    With only a few exceptions, it would be hard to find anyone who would say a bad word about the man.

  • In my last column we talked about how our community and Fort Knox partners had just returned from the Road Show trips to the incoming units and organizations. We continue to receive positive feedback from those units who want their civilian workforce to make the transfer to Fort Knox.

  • One of the toughest professions in the world continues to be education.Each year, millions of individuals are dedicated to helping young and old improve their lives.Bullitt County has been blessed over the years to have excellent educators. Yes, there are some who probably don’t belong in the profession. But they are far, far outweighed by the great ones.Each year, dozens of educators will retire.

  • As gas prices soar over $4 per gallon, motorists are making tough decisions with regard to their summer travel plans.In fact, many are opting to stay close to home this vacation season. However, there are some who have other plans.Plans that, in the long run, could cost them even more.“As the price of gas increases, we tend to see more drive-offs at the gas pumps - when people simply drive away without paying for the fuel taken,” said Bullitt County Attorney Walter Sholar.

  • FRANKFORT – Last week’s special legislative session on reforming our public retirement systems may have only taken five days – the shortest time needed for a bill to become law – but it culminated more than a year of ongoing study.The end result was well worth the wait, however, based on the unanimous vote by the House and near-unanimous vote in the Senate and the support from the many groups affected by these changes.Legislators have known for some time that Kentucky eventually would need to update the retirement syst