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Opinion

  • One of the most thankless jobs may be an appointment to an agency, such as a fire board or a civil service commission.

    Probably few people understand the responsibility of these agencies, especially when questions are posed by those outside.

    In Shepherdsville, the civil service commission is a three-member body that listens to appeals of disciplinary action taken against employees.

    It is also the body that certifies test scores for merit openings.

  • To many people, it must have been a remarkable picture.

    After months of bitter campaigning, President-elect Barack Obama sat next to Sen. John McCain for a meeting a few days ago. They talked at length about how they could reach across party lines to discuss – and move forward on – some of the nation’s most challenging issues.

    If they can do this on a national level, why can’t we do it in Kentucky?

    The truth is: we can and we must. At a defining hour in our state’s history we need the same kind of bipartisan spirit.

  • Dear Santa,

    I'm at work on Christmas Eve. Everyone has left except me and Mr. Barr. Get him something nice this year.

    I've tried to be good. I've even put in extra effort on The Pioneer News Web site. I'll try to keep my list small:

    It's my Grandma's 90th Christmas. Give her something nice to enjoy it, even if it's just family visits and a free subscription to The Pioneer News.

    Get something really cool for all my nieces and nephews, unless they were bad. My siblings might endorse coal and switches if you feel they are necessary.

  • Thousands of people die or are injured in alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes each year in the United States. In Bullitt County there were 98 collisions involving drinking drivers and 14 collisions involving drivers under influence of drugs in 2007 (KSP Traffic Report, 2007).

    The Bullitt County Partners In Prevention Coalition members urges Bullitt County residents to avoid driving while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs during this holiday season. Don’t turn what should be a happy season into a lifelong bad memory for your family.

  • Michael Neal is "paying it forward" in a most positive way.

    The concept of helping others as a way of paying back for the help received began with Benjamin Franklin, circa 1784. Michael has just completed his first Cooper/Clayton Smoking Cessation Clinic as a volunteer facilitator.

  • The lights hadn’t dimmed before the question was whether the Shepherdsville City Council should be expecting a lawsuit?

    The question came after the city council approved Sunday liquor sales for Precinct 18A for USGA certified golf courses.

    In Shepherdsville, that means that only the Heritage Hill golf community would be allowed to have Sunday liquor sales.

    For the owners of the golf course, it really isn’t about liquor sales. That is a small percentage of its bottom line.

  • Traditional holiday meals are closely tied with that family ‘feel good’ when everyone is together and enjoying each other’s company and sharing food.

    While there may be a slight hesitation to convert Grandma’s perfect pumpkin pie into low fat, it may be well worth it to slide some healthier options to the table for taste tests that may surprise you.

    Low fat and recipe makeovers do not always sound good, however these two have become staples in our household and no one has ever noticed nor complained!

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - Citizens and local officials are on high red alert due to a loose turkey now considered to be a vigilante outlaw.

    Godwyn T. Byrd, originally from Browningtown, had been selected as this year’s official Bullitt County turkey. Now he is public enemy number one according to Bullitt County Sheriffs.

    The alert was issued following a recent Bullitt Fiscal Court meeting. County Judge/Executive Melanie Roberts was scheduled to pardon Byrd as part of a special Thanksgiving holiday ceremony.

  • We can talk about the changes in the White House and the number of new faces who will adorn local governmental offices at the start of the new year.

    But now is the season that communities like Bullitt County shine. It is the holiday season.

    We shine not because of the bright lights that hang from our homes or the displays in Shepherdsville City Park.

    The illumination comes from the kindness and generosity shown by so many in this community.

  • You don’t often have a second bite at the apple.

    But that apple could be sweet or it could be bitter.

    Members of the Shepherdsville City Council will have a second opportunity to determine whether liquor sales should be allowed by the drink on Sundays.

    This is the second vote on the measure in the past six months.

    In July, the council deadlocked at 3-3 and Mayor Sherman Tinnell broke the die to defeat the proposal to allow Sunday sales.

    The second vote on the same evening to allow Sunday sales at licensed golf courses met the same fate.

  • Recently, the issue of lowering the drinking age has received significant media attention.

    A group called Choose Responsibility has enlisted over 100 university and college presidents to sign on in support of a debate on the merits of the 21-year-old drinking age.

    For thousands of public health professionals, researchers and community and youth advocates, this announcement, dubbed the Amethyst Initiative, is troubling.

    Many of the arguments seem quite rational.

    If one can fight for his country, why not be able to drink a beer?

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE – Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency has begun the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP),  through December 12, 2008 in an effort to assist low-income residents with high utility bills. LIHEAP is a statewide initiative sponsored by Community Action Kentucky, in partnership with the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS).

  • FRANKFORT – In less than seven weeks, the General Assembly will meet for what will be the fifth odd-year regular session since voters made them possible in 2000.

    During those 30 legislative days, the first five of which are dedicated to administrative matters like electing House and Senate leaders, legislators will consider dozens of issues.  Earlier this month, the General Assembly’s administrative arm, known as the Legislative Research Commission, issued its annual report on what some of those might include.