• Traditional holiday meals are closely tied with that family ‘feel good’ when everyone is together and enjoying each other’s company and sharing food.

    While there may be a slight hesitation to convert Grandma’s perfect pumpkin pie into low fat, it may be well worth it to slide some healthier options to the table for taste tests that may surprise you.

    Low fat and recipe makeovers do not always sound good, however these two have become staples in our household and no one has ever noticed nor complained!

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE - Citizens and local officials are on high red alert due to a loose turkey now considered to be a vigilante outlaw.

    Godwyn T. Byrd, originally from Browningtown, had been selected as this year’s official Bullitt County turkey. Now he is public enemy number one according to Bullitt County Sheriffs.

    The alert was issued following a recent Bullitt Fiscal Court meeting. County Judge/Executive Melanie Roberts was scheduled to pardon Byrd as part of a special Thanksgiving holiday ceremony.

  • We can talk about the changes in the White House and the number of new faces who will adorn local governmental offices at the start of the new year.

    But now is the season that communities like Bullitt County shine. It is the holiday season.

    We shine not because of the bright lights that hang from our homes or the displays in Shepherdsville City Park.

    The illumination comes from the kindness and generosity shown by so many in this community.

  • You don’t often have a second bite at the apple.

    But that apple could be sweet or it could be bitter.

    Members of the Shepherdsville City Council will have a second opportunity to determine whether liquor sales should be allowed by the drink on Sundays.

    This is the second vote on the measure in the past six months.

    In July, the council deadlocked at 3-3 and Mayor Sherman Tinnell broke the die to defeat the proposal to allow Sunday sales.

    The second vote on the same evening to allow Sunday sales at licensed golf courses met the same fate.

  • Recently, the issue of lowering the drinking age has received significant media attention.

    A group called Choose Responsibility has enlisted over 100 university and college presidents to sign on in support of a debate on the merits of the 21-year-old drinking age.

    For thousands of public health professionals, researchers and community and youth advocates, this announcement, dubbed the Amethyst Initiative, is troubling.

    Many of the arguments seem quite rational.

    If one can fight for his country, why not be able to drink a beer?

  • SHEPHERDSVILLE – Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency has begun the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP),  through December 12, 2008 in an effort to assist low-income residents with high utility bills. LIHEAP is a statewide initiative sponsored by Community Action Kentucky, in partnership with the Cabinet for Health and Family Services (CHFS).

  • FRANKFORT – In less than seven weeks, the General Assembly will meet for what will be the fifth odd-year regular session since voters made them possible in 2000.

    During those 30 legislative days, the first five of which are dedicated to administrative matters like electing House and Senate leaders, legislators will consider dozens of issues.  Earlier this month, the General Assembly’s administrative arm, known as the Legislative Research Commission, issued its annual report on what some of those might include.

  • 4-H is a community of young people across America that learns leadership, citizenship and life skills.

    For the past two decades, Kentucky 4-H has given youths an opportunity to attend a four-day “Issues Conference” to develop such skills.

    This year’s 4-H Issues Conference will be Nov. 20-23 at the Lake Cumberland 4-H Educational Center in Jabez.

  • It’s okay to be a little scared at Halloween. It’s actually kind of fun. Old traditions of days past used to literally frighten people. Today they are a constant source of Halloween entertainment.

    Trick-or-treaters are the most common take on this change. Kids used to dress as hobos and tramps, begging for candy and treats. Now they dress up from the best-known celebrities to the creepiest of souls.

  • The elections are over and we know the playing field in January.

    Whether it is in the White House or in the city hall chambers, there are tough times that must be addressed by all.

    The country has taken an historic step in the election of Barack Obama. We must rally behind the new president and we must demand that steps are taken to return the country to its economic standing.

    We must look at our local leaders -- many of whom will be taking office for the first time. There will a mix of the old and new. It will take leadership to bring the sides together.

  • Let me first say that it has been heartening to see communities across Kentucky pull together to help those in need following the devastating windstorm that swept across our state on September 14. 

    Families were put to the test with damaged homes, loss of power and in some cases, the loss of life.

    As Kentuckians so often do when faced with adversity, we responded with kindness, compassion and concern for our neighbors.

  • Total fractures were over 2 million, costing nearly $17 billion in 2005, according to a study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

    Osteoporosis is more than a disease that affects the elderly.


    The population is aging, this means more and more people are reaching the high-risk age for osteoporosis-age 50.

    It also means the burden of the cost is falling on fewer and fewer workers.

    It is not just hip fractures either.

  • No matter your political persuasion, the visit on Monday by First Lady Laura Bush was wonderful.

    Seldom does Shepherdsville and Bullitt County have an opportunity to shine on something that is positive.

    Yes, Monday’s appearance was a political stump for the Republican Party. There is no doubt of that.

    But it was also a historic opportunity for Bullitt County.

    Many in the crowd of 1,000 weren’t members of the Republican Party. Some were there to support the party; others were there to see the First Lady.