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Man indicted for kidnapping, wanton endangerment

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 SHEPHERDSVILLE — A man has been charged with kidnapping.

The Bullitt County Grand Jury recently indicted Kenneth L. Hodge.

He was indicted for kidnapping and wanton endangerment.

According to the indictment, on April 1, 2018, Hodge unlawfully restrained an individual.

He also engaged in conduct which placed the individual in substantial danger of death or serious injury.

The most serious offense is a Class B felony, which is punishable by 10-20 years in prison.

Bullitt County Sheriff’s Det. Bruce Rucker investigated.

In other felony indictments:

*David G. Lester — charged with trafficking in a controlled substance with a firearm, trafficking in marijuana while in possession of a firearm, possession of a handgun by a convicted felon, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon and possession of drug paraphernalia while in possession of a firearm.

The indictment alleges that on May 21, 2018, Lester had methamphetamine and marijuana while in possession of a firearm.

He was also a convicted felon with possession of a firearm and a hand gun on that date.

The most serious offense is a Class B felony, which is punishable by 10-20 years in prison.

The Bullitt County Sheriff’s Drug Task Force investigated.

*Chilrisa M. Kininmonth — charged with theft by unlawful taking over $10,000 but less than $1 million, knowing exploitation of an adult over $300 and receiving stolen property over $500 but less than $10,000.

The indictment alleges that between Jan. 18, 2017, and Feb. 4, 2017, Kininmonth took control over property that belonged to another individual or an estate.

During that same time, Kininmonth allegedly exploited an adult with a loss of over $300.

And during this time, she was in possession of property stolen from another individual.

The most serious offense is a Class C felony, which is punishable by 5-10 years in prison.

This is a re-indictment of a prior case. Det. Scotty McGaha of the Bullitt County Sheriff’s Office investigated.

*Kristina Edwards — charged with trafficking in a controlled substance (three counts) and possession of a controlled substance.

The indictment alleges that on May 15, 2018, Edwards had methamphetamine and heroin in her possession with the intent to sell.

She also has possession of opiates on that same date.

The most serious offense is a Class C felony, which is punishable by 5-10 years in prison.

Shepherdsville officer Scott Creason investigated.

*Anthony W. Hill — charged  with complicity to trafficking in a controlled substance.

According to the indictment, Hill had methamphetamine in his possession on April 16, 2018, with the intent to sell.

This is a Class C felony, which is punishable by 5-10 years in prison.

McAllister was the investigating officer.

*Ronald Lee Seay — charged with complicity to trafficking in a controlled substance.

According to the indictment, Seay had possession of methamphetamine on April 16, 2018.

This is a Class C felony, which is punishable by 5-10 years in prison.

McAllister investigated.

*Mikiya B. McDaniel — charged with five counts of wanton endangerment, fleeing police, criminal mischief and criminal possession of a forged instrument.

The indictment alleges that on May 15, 2018, McDaniel drove her vehicle at a high rate of speed through heavy traffic while fleeing police.

During that time, she placed the lives of five individuals at substantial danger of death or serious physical injury.

The chase that included McDaniel hit a liquor store, which caused over $1,000 of damage.

The most serious offense was the alleged possession of a forged instrument. This is a Class C felony, which is punishable by 5-10 years in prison.

Shepherdsville officer Matt Johnson investigated.

*Douglas E. Lanham — charged with complicity to possession of a controlled substance.

The indictment  alleges that on May 1, 2018, Lanham had methamphetamine in his possession.

This is a Class D felony, which is punishable by 1-3 years in prison.

Creason was the investigating officer.

*Joseph D. Pike — charged with complicity to possession of a controlled substance.

On May 1, 2018, he allegedly had methamphetamine in his possession.

This is a Class D felony that is punishable by 1-3 years in prison.

Creason investigated.

*Zachariah Christopher Edmonson — charged with possession of a controlled substance.

The indictment alleges that on April 13, 2018, Edmonson had methamphetamine in his possession.

This is a Class D felony, which is punishable by 1-3 years in prison.

Shepherdsville officer Billy Allen investigated.

*Jerry Wayne Summitt — charged with possession of a controlled substance and tampering with physical evidence, as well as being a persistent felony offender.

The indictment alleges that on April 9, 2018, Summitt had methamphetamine in his possession.

Also, he tampered with evidence.

The most serious offense is a Class D felony, which is punishable by 1-5 years in prison.

However, due to a past felony in Nelson County, any new sentence can be enhanced.

Mount Washington officer Johnathan Brown investigated.

*Kayla Embry — charged with possession of a controlled substance.

According to the indictment, on April 10, 2018, she had methamphetamine in her possession.

The Class D felony is punishable by 1-3 years in prison.

Mount Washington police officer Derek Nalley investigated.

*James T. Merideth — charged with possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, possession of a controlled substance while in possession of a firearm by a convicted felon and possession of drug paraphernalia by a convicted felon.

The indictment alleges that on March 29, 2018, Merideth had methamphetamine in his possession, as well as drug paraphernalia.

This was when he also had a firearm while being a convicted felon.

The most serious offense is a Class D felony, which is punishable by 1-5 years in prison.

Hillview officer Elliot Clark investigated.

*Sierra Elizabeth Edds — charged with wanton endangerment.

According to the indictment, on April 23, 2018, Edds was smoking marijuana and not properly caring for her minor children. She was charged with two counts of wanton endangerment.

The most serious offense is a Class D felony, which is punishable by 1-5 years in prison.

Shepherdsville officer Casey Clark investigated.

*Tyler Ray England — charged with receiving stolen property over $500 but under $10,000

The indictment alleges that on Oct. 26, 2018, England had property that he should have known was stolen from MTM Management.

This is a Class D felony, which is punishable by 1-5 years in prison.

*Gregory Allen George — charged with obscuring the identity of a machine over $500 but less than $10,000, fleeing police and three counts of wanton endangerment.

According to the indictment, George altered the identification markings of a car on March 25, 2018 and fled police when they attempted to stop him.

During the escape, he placed three individuals in danger.

The most serious offense is a Class D felony, which is punishable by 1-5 years in prison.

Hillview officer Kyle McAllister investigated the case.

*Christopher J. McKenzie Jr. — charged with theft by unlawful taking over $500 and being a persistent felony offender.

The indictment alleges that on April 1, 2018, McKenzie had control of a trailer and materials of another individual.

This is a Class D felony, which is punishable by 1-5 years. However, due to a trio of past felony convictions, any new sentence could be enhanced.

Mount Washington Det. Jeremy Schmidt investigated.

*Roger Hovious and Robert P. Trepanier — both were charged with flagrant non-support.

The indictments allege that the individuals fell more than $1,000 behind in child support and/or failed to make a payment over the past six months.

The charge is a Class D felony, which is punishable by 1-5 years in prison.

An indictment does not mean guilt or innocence. Instead, it means that at least nine of the 12 grand jurors felt enough information was presented to move forward with a criminal trial.